Editing translations: Part I: Different types of editing

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Correcting a text or manuscript according to preset rules, i.e. the rules on spelling, grammar and punctuation of a specific language. Copyeditors often have to use style guides, e.g. if they are working for a publisher, and also have to check things like consistency of terminology.  
Correcting a text or manuscript according to preset rules, i.e. the rules on spelling, grammar and punctuation of a specific language. Copyeditors often have to use style guides, e.g. if they are working for a publisher, and also have to check things like consistency of terminology.  
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'''''''''''''Stylistic editing'''''''''''''
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''''''Stylistic editing''''''
Making texts more readable and tailoring them according to the readership.  
Making texts more readable and tailoring them according to the readership.  

Revision as of 12:44, 7 December 2010


Copyediting

Correcting a text or manuscript according to preset rules, i.e. the rules on spelling, grammar and punctuation of a specific language. Copyeditors often have to use style guides, e.g. if they are working for a publisher, and also have to check things like consistency of terminology.

'Stylistic editing'

Making texts more readable and tailoring them according to the readership.

Structural editing

Improving the general presentation of a text.

Content editing

Working on the actual content and suggesting what could be added or omitted.


Copyediting and stylistic editing apply the most to translations.

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