Opinion & features

Successfully Write An Eye-Catching Translation CV

By: Andrea Capuselli

As companies increasingly turn towards international operations and expand into global markets, there is also a greater need for translators.

A carefully curated translation CV is essential if you want to stand out from the crowd and secure new projects and clients. In order to successfully compete against other translators, here are five top tips to improve your translation CV.

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national operations and expand into global markets, there is also a greater need for translators.

A carefully curated translation CV is essential if you want to stand out from the crowd and secure new projects and clients. In order to successfully compete against other translators, here are five top tips to improve your translation CV.

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Freelance Finance: Setting Rates

By: Andrea Capuselli

Here at The Savvy Newcomer we understand that it can be intimidating to talk about money. It’s often a sticky subject, but we feel it couldn’t be more important to address as small business owners. One major component of succeeding as a freelance translator or interpreter is managing your finances well. If you don’t master your money, your translation career won’t be profitable or sustainable. This series on money matters is intended to get right to the heart of some of our biggest questions about freelance finances; we won’t shy away from the tough questions and we invite you to dive into these topics along with us.

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How the translation of a Bengali play led to a British priest being convicted for libel in 1861

By: Andrea Capuselli

Nil Darpan or The Indigo Planting Mirror was a Bengali play written by Dinabandhu Mitra in 1858-’59. The drama was written in the context of social agitation in Bengal, known as the Indigo Revolt. The play examines the treatment of the Indian peasantry or ryots by the indigo planters. It was first published in 1860.

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How to translate Perumal Murugan: Nandini Krishnan on her experience with ‘Estuary’

By: Andrea Capuselli

Award-winning Tamil writer Perumal Murugan’s latest novel Estuary has been translated by Nandini Krishnan. Estuary is a curious book. It may appear flat in its tone, but the preoccupation of the government clerk Kumarasurar with his son Meghas’s welfare is universal. Many parents will identify with it. Much of the story revolves around Meghas’s request for a fancy smartphone that Kumarasurar may or not be able to afford. Estuary is a commentary on society and a gentle dig at people who are immune to external influences and refuse to evolve.

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Against the “Good” Translation: The Power of Disobedience

By: Andrea Capuselli

Today on WWB Daily, Gitanjali Patel and Jessie Spivey of Shadow Heroes, an organization that runs creative translation workshops for students, take on the myth of the “good” translation. Deconstructing the harmful and exclusionary assumptions behind the phrase, they propose an alternative approach to translation.

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A language access timeline for interpreting on the West Coast

By: Andrea Capuselli

Interpreting is a professional field. What was once done by whoever was bilingual now has an established certification process. There are less and less reasons to work with unvetted providers. This timeline tells the story on the West Coast, where I live. I am from Oregon, where I am certified as a healthcare interpreter and a court interpreter. The story is told from an Oregon perspective. However, nothing happens in isolation. Oregon often works in partnership with the other West Coast states, or observes their work closely. What happens in the court interpreting field affects the work in the healthcare interpreting field. The story would not be complete without the federal context. Therefore, there are elements from all West Coast states and the history of court and healthcare certification is intermingled.

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The Past, Present and Future of Machine Translation with Alex Zekakis of XTM

By: Andrea Capuselli

With many organizations expanding their reach and going global, the role of translation is becoming increasingly important. Businesses need effective multilingual communication with their partners, employees and customers across cultural borders if they are to succeed in international markets.

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The language of lockdown in South Africa

By: Catharine Cellier-Smart

When the Covid-19 pandemic hit, a whole new set of terms entered our lexicon.

Broadcasters, translators and language practitioners had to scramble to find ways to translate them into South Africa’s indigenous languages.

https://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/2020-09-16-the-language-of-lockdown-excuse-me-do-you-speak-covid/

Website localization basics and a Jooble case study

By: Loie Favre

How do you reach the new potential markets and enhance your digital presence in order to please international customers? The answer is website localization.

Translation is simply translating the copy from one language to another. You have “a red apple” in English and “une pomme rouge” in French. Simple as that.

Localization is far more tricky. It is a process of adapting your product (i.e. a website) to a specific market or audience in accordance with the audience’s culture. Think of design elements as an example. If we compare the Canadian and Japanese Coca-Cola websites, we will see that the design differs drastically. While the Canadian website seems to have a clearer layout and displays the messages about the brand’s value and mission, the Japanese version of the site seems over packed with information and images. But is it wrong? Not at all! The trick is, Asian audience loves to learn as much information as possible about the product before buying it, so Coca-Cola clearly did some quality research before launching the Japanese website.

In the article, you can read up on:

  • Website localization: A step-by-step checklist
  • Main pitfalls of localization
  • How to use automation
  • Jooble case study: the job search portal that expanded globally

https://multilingual.com/website-localization-basics-and-a-jooble-case-study/

A Reading List for National Translation Month

By: Andrea Capuselli

We’re proud to have as CLMP Members many presses and literary journals that champion work in translation from around the world. Here are some books and magazine issues we recommend reading in September and year-round—and check out our reading list for August’s Women in Translation Month for more!

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Fil-Am’s poetry in the time of Covid gets Thai translation

By: Andrea Capuselli

Eileen R Tabios’s Inculpatory Evidence is a collection of 10 poems translated into Thai language by Natthaya Thamdee, a professional translator and lecturer at Vongchavalitkul University in Nakhon Ratchasima Thailand. It was published by Laughing/Ouch/Cube/Productions and i.e. press, California-New York. It is also Tabios’s third bilingual edition.

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The Dutch government is underestimating the value of good interpreters and translators

By: Catharine Cellier-Smart
The justice minister of the Netherlands has decided to downgrade the professional requirements for interpreters & translators to ‘secondary school levels’

A debate on name order highlights an old translation issue

By: Catharine Cellier-Smart

Minister of Defense Taro Kono is back on Twitter asking for the English media to use his desired name order, Kono Taro. In the process, he stirred up an 150-year-long public debate on how Japanese names should be rendered in Western languages.

Last fall, Japan embraced a policy to swap the order and write the surname first on all official documents, recommending capitalization to emphasize which name is the family name. Accordingly, Shinzo Abe would become ABE Shinzo and, it follows, Hayao Miyazaki would be MIYAZAKI Hayao, and Naomi Osaka, OSAKA Naomi.

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/life/2020/09/15/language/japanese-name-order/

Kuwaiti publisher Takween releases Arabic translation of Persian novel “Prison for the Criminals”

By: Andrea Capuselli

The book was originally published by the Persian publishing company Cheshmeh in 2018 and soon became a bestseller.

It has been rendered into Arabic by prominent Arab translator Ahmad Heidari who has translated several other books by Iranian writers including Sadeq Hedayat’s “Isfahan, Half of the World” and Bozorg Alavi’s “Her Eyes”.

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US author’s manuscript on Japan’s invasion

By: Andrea Capuselli

This year marks the 75th anniversary of the victory in the War of Resistance Against Japanese Aggression (1931-45), which falls on Thursday. A manuscript, collected by a translator from Shandong province, uncovers facts buried in the fierce war.

Now being carefully restored by the translator and writer Wang Jinling, the manuscript by US novelist Irving Wallace, reveals the Japanese army’s atrocities and Chinese people’s struggle in the most desperate condition.

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You May Not Know Ann Goldstein. But Without Her, You Might Not Know Elena Ferrante Either

By: Andrea Capuselli

Behind every world-renowned author is a largely unknown translator. Yet in the case of Elena Ferrante, Italy’s reclusive literary phenomenon, the translator has emerged from behind the curtain of quiet stewardship to become a quasi-celebrity in her own right. Ann Goldstein, a celebrated translator of Italian and the longtime chief of the copy department at The New Yorker, began translating Ferrante in 2004, when she won a contest to take on the translation of The Days of Abandonment. In the years to follow, Ferrante’s Neapolitan Quartet became a global sensation, selling over ten million copies in forty countries. All the while, the pseudonymous Ferrante has fiercely guarded her anonymity, saying, “I can say with a certain pride that in my country, the titles of my novels are better known than my name. I think this is a good outcome.”

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FinTech translations advantages and best practices

By: Loie Favre

If you are looking to do FinTech translations, whether it be for a broker, trading company, bank or other, it has its own particularities that make it different to other types of translation. Here we explore what to pay attention to, best courses of action, and some data that will help companies know in which demographics they should be localizing their services:

https://www.smartcat.ai/blog/fintech-localization-for-trading-companies/

A tribute to Manabendra Bandyopadhyay

By: Andrea Capuselli

He was a recognized poet and a novelist too, but his prominence as a translator overshadows his other identities. He always stayed in touch with the latest publications in Spanish and English. It is safe to say that through his masterly translations, he almost single-handedly brought the gems of Latin American and Indian literature to our doorstep.

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Court interpreters’ priorities: Their health and to interpret

By: Andrea Capuselli

Although we are still in the middle of a world-wide pandemic, I have heard from several colleagues that some courts in the United States, and elsewhere, are back in session and they are asking court interpreters to attend in-person hearings. Courts may have their reasons to reopen, but I think is a bad idea for interpreters to answer the call at this time. Covid-19 is very contagious and continues to spread all over the United States and many other countries. This is not the time to risk our health, and perhaps our future, to make the not-so-good court interpreter fees. Technology is such that courthouses can hold virtual hearings, or distance interpreting if they want to have in-person sessions. There are solutions for all judicial district budgets, from fancy distance interpreting platforms, to Zoom, to a simple over-the-phone interpretation with 3-way calling and a speaker phone. Federal courts have provided over the phone interpretation in certain court appearances for many years.  Most hearings are short appearances that do not justify risking the interpreter. As for more complex evidentiary hearings and trials, just as conferences have temporarily migrated to this modality, distance interpreting can happen with a few adjustments. If in-person court interpreting is a bad idea right now, in-person interpreting at a detention center, jail or prison, is out of the question. At least in the United States, detention facilities are at the top of places where more Covid-19 cases have been detected.

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Is It Worth It for You To Do an MA in Translation Studies?

By: Andrea Capuselli

This article by Gwenydd Jones looks at the pros and cons of doing an MA in Translation Studies. It’ll help you think ahead and figure out whether doing an MA is the right choice for you.

With the cost of university study continually rising, you’re probably asking yourself whether doing an MA in translation studies is worth the investment. The answer will depend on your own circumstances and goals, as this article will explain. By the end, you should have a better idea of whether or not doing an MA in translation studies is worth it for you.

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