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Third ProZ.com Translation Contest » English to Czech

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Source text in English

The problem of being awkward with introductions is not, for many, an “unusual situation.” You may find that you are often uncertain about whether to introduce someone using their first name, last name, or both; about whether to use a qualifier (“this is my friend, ______”); even about whether or not it is in fact your responsibility to introduce two people in a given situation. But all of this is small potatoes compared with the seemingly inevitable mingling nightmare of having to introduce someone whose name you have forgotten.

It’s one thing to forget someone’s name if you’ve met them only once or twice, or if you haven’t seen them in a while. But all too often it’s someone whose name you really should know, and who is going to be insulted to find out you don’t. In other words, a faux pas in the making.

This is absolute agony when it happens, and I’ve watched hundreds of minglers try to deal with different ways, ranging from exuberant apology (“Oh GOD, I’m so sorry, JEEZ, wow, I can’t believe I’ve forgotten your name!”) to throwing up their hands and walking away. But there are better ways to deal with this kind of mental slip. Next time you draw a blank while making introductions, try the following ploy:

Force them to introduce themselves. This is the smoothest and most effective way to handle your memory lapse. When it’s done well, no one will ever suspect you. If you have forgotten one person’s name in the group, turn to that person first and smile. Then turn invitingly to a person whose name you do remember and say, “This is Linden Bond,” turning back casually toward the forgotten person. The person whose name you haven’t mentioned yet will automatically (it’s a reflex) say “Nice to meet you, Linden, I’m Sylvia Cooper,” and usually offer a hand to shake.

The winning entry has been announced in this pair.

There were 3 entries submitted in this pair during the submission phase. The winning entry was determined based on finals round voting by peers.

Competition in this pair is now closed.


Entries (3 total) Expand all entries

Entry #1040
Daniel Šebesta
Daniel Šebesta
Czech Republic
Winner
Voting points1st2nd3rd
61 x41 x20
Entry #1214
Voting points1st2nd3rd
41 x400