styrkor

English translation: riffles

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Swedish term or phrase:strykor
English translation:riffles
Entered by: Clare Barnes

05:57 Mar 27, 2006
Swedish to English translations [PRO]
Sports / Fitness / Recreation / fishing
Swedish term or phrase: styrkor
I think these are areas of calmer/slower water in a river. The Swedish makes a differentiation between this and a "sel", but it is possible that they are just listing synonyms/using regional terminology.
Clare Barnes
Sweden
Local time: 02:42
riffle
Explanation:

hey, just happened to notice this question.
i grew up fly-fishing, and the terms we always used the most were:
riffles, eddies, swirls, and pools to describe the different kinds of water in a stream.
also, back-eddy, side-eddy, sort of a large riffle, a slow pool, etc... depending on the water...
but a strong run of water that is not an actual waterfall, we always called a riffle...
cascade is too strong... too waterfally... and rapids makes me think of whitewater rafting...
Selected response from:

lo nathamundi
United States
Local time: 17:42
Grading comment
Perfect, thank you. The other terms you've given are also really useful...
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5rapids
Lars Jelking
3riffle
lo nathamundi
4 -1cascade
Diarmuid Kennan


Discussion entries: 5





  

Answers


2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
rapids


Explanation:
A "stryka" is fast-flowing water, not necessarily breaking or with falls.

Lars Jelking
Israel
Local time: 03:42
Native speaker of: Native in SwedishSwedish
PRO pts in category: 8
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
cascade


Explanation:
How about this?

Diarmuid Kennan
Ireland
Local time: 01:42
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Lars Jelking: A 'stryka' is normally without braking water or falls. Simply a fast flowing piece of the stream.
28 mins
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2 days 23 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
riffle


Explanation:

hey, just happened to notice this question.
i grew up fly-fishing, and the terms we always used the most were:
riffles, eddies, swirls, and pools to describe the different kinds of water in a stream.
also, back-eddy, side-eddy, sort of a large riffle, a slow pool, etc... depending on the water...
but a strong run of water that is not an actual waterfall, we always called a riffle...
cascade is too strong... too waterfally... and rapids makes me think of whitewater rafting...


    Reference: http://www.theriffleflyshop.com/reports.php
    Reference: http://www.riffleandrise.com
lo nathamundi
United States
Local time: 17:42
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Perfect, thank you. The other terms you've given are also really useful...
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



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