längst ut

English translation: furthest out

06:03 Apr 11, 2006
Swedish to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature / literature
Swedish term or phrase: längst ut
original context is a novel.

the characters are putting a dock in place.

I enlighet med Henrys ritning förtöjde vi bryggan med fyra rep i två stadiga björkar och förankrade med halvslaka trossar både längst ut och inne vid land. Lite spelrum var av nöden...

In accordance with Henry's drawing, we anchored down the dock with four lines of rope running to two thick birches and half-slack lines of thick rope attached both ???? and to the shore.

I'm having trouble seeing this.
How many lines total?
Are these different kinds of rope?
Does the 'längst ut' mean 'at the end of the dock', ie, the 'lake-end' of the dock, as opposed to the 'shore-end' of the dock, or does it mean way out in the lake itself? underwater? HELP.
lo nathamundi
United States
Local time: 17:13
English translation:furthest out
Explanation:
Hi jk! Yup, furthest out - at the lake end. It doesn't exactly say where or how, but they are "anchored" - think of them as anchor ropes, holding the end of the jetty more or less above a certain place on the lake bed.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 38 mins (2006-04-11 06:41:41 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Reply to Kathy's note - I now can't edit my comment for some reason! I have checked a bit more (I love things like this!) and my dictionary provides the following note:

"Farther, farthest, further and furthest can all be used to refer to literal [physical] distance, but further and furthest are preferred for figurative [intangible] senses denoting greater or additional amount, time, etc... "
Selected response from:

Clare Barnes
Sweden
Local time: 02:13
Grading comment
thank you, clare... i may use the lake end and the shore end... as always, not sure yet...
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +1the outer end
Lars Jelking
4 +1furthest out
Clare Barnes


  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
furthest out


Explanation:
Hi jk! Yup, furthest out - at the lake end. It doesn't exactly say where or how, but they are "anchored" - think of them as anchor ropes, holding the end of the jetty more or less above a certain place on the lake bed.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 38 mins (2006-04-11 06:41:41 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Reply to Kathy's note - I now can't edit my comment for some reason! I have checked a bit more (I love things like this!) and my dictionary provides the following note:

"Farther, farthest, further and furthest can all be used to refer to literal [physical] distance, but further and furthest are preferred for figurative [intangible] senses denoting greater or additional amount, time, etc... "

Clare Barnes
Sweden
Local time: 02:13
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 9
Grading comment
thank you, clare... i may use the lake end and the shore end... as always, not sure yet...

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Kathy Saranpa: but it should be "farthest," not "furthest" -- "farthest" is physical distance, "furthest" is intangible (i.e. it was the furthest thing from my mind)
15 mins
  -> Thank you - both farthest and furthest are acceptable according to my dictionary - could it be a UK/US thing?
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

59 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
the outer end


Explanation:
"As shown on Henry's drawing we secured the jetty to both the outer and inner ends using four half-slack ropes to a couple of sturdy birch-trees. Some play was required ....."

Four lines, type and size not defined. If the jetty was to be of any use it must have been floating.

Lars Jelking
Israel
Local time: 03:13
Native speaker of: Native in SwedishSwedish
PRO pts in category: 19

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Nina Engberg
10 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs (or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.

KudoZ™ translation help

The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.


See also:

Your current localization setting

English

Select a language

Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search