tjälskottiga

English translation: frost-damaged

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Swedish term or phrase:tjälskottiga
English translation:frost-damaged
Entered by: Lars Jelking

05:33 Mar 30, 2006
Swedish to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature / literature
Swedish term or phrase: tjälskottiga
original context is a novel.

Just nu, just på den här knaggliga, tjälskottiga grusvägen mellan Åsbro och Sjölycke, satt den mitt i hjärtat.

Just then, on those bumpy and TJÄLSKOTTIGA? gravel trails between Åsbro and Sjölycke, it was sitting right in my heart.

What does this mean?
In english?
Does it have other metaphorical connotations/ uses?
lo nathamundi
United States
Local time: 10:17
frostdamaged
Explanation:
'Tjälskott' translates to "pot-hole" or "frost heave" depending on the direction it takes. 'Frostdamage' covers it all.
When the trapped ice in the road bank thaws it's volume changes causing the road surface to buckle and brake.
Selected response from:

Lars Jelking
Israel
Local time: 20:17
Grading comment
frost-damaged is clearly the succinct, correct answer. i loved all the commentary by everyone, very helpful. wish there was more even. 'pot-hole' or 'mudhole' seems the most natural in english. i've never heard anyone say anything about a 'frost heave', maybe it's a british thing? heave makes me think of puking and 'heave ho'...
bumpy and frost-heaved roads?
bumpy and mudhole-riddled roads?
i still have to decide what sounds good, but now at least i know what i'm deciding. thanks.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +1damaged by frost heave
Clare Barnes
4frostdamaged
Lars Jelking


  

Answers


45 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
frostdamaged


Explanation:
'Tjälskott' translates to "pot-hole" or "frost heave" depending on the direction it takes. 'Frostdamage' covers it all.
When the trapped ice in the road bank thaws it's volume changes causing the road surface to buckle and brake.

Lars Jelking
Israel
Local time: 20:17
Native speaker of: Native in SwedishSwedish
PRO pts in category: 19
Grading comment
frost-damaged is clearly the succinct, correct answer. i loved all the commentary by everyone, very helpful. wish there was more even. 'pot-hole' or 'mudhole' seems the most natural in english. i've never heard anyone say anything about a 'frost heave', maybe it's a british thing? heave makes me think of puking and 'heave ho'...
bumpy and frost-heaved roads?
bumpy and mudhole-riddled roads?
i still have to decide what sounds good, but now at least i know what i'm deciding. thanks.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Clare Barnes: this should be two separate words in English...
31 mins
  -> OK, 'frost damaged'.
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41 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
damaged by frost heave


Explanation:
...is the literal meaning. Bumpy and frost broken gravel roads could be one suggestion.

I've never seen tjälskott used as anything other than a noun before!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 day56 mins (2006-03-31 06:29:38 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

http://www.pavement.com/PavTech/Tech/Fundamentals/fundfrost....

http://www.bartleby.com/61/12/F0341200.html

http://www.sandpointinsider.com/LPMArticle.asp?ID=77

Clare Barnes
Sweden
Local time: 19:17
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 9

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  EKM: No, this is non-standard usage, but fully comprehensible. Authors have artistic license... but if you wrote this in a high-school essay your teacher would definitely mark it red.
30 mins
  -> Thank you! (and what a terrible place the world would be if authors didn't have artistic licence...

neutral  arvendal: What you miss is the literary quality of "tjälskottiga". I think it's important to keep the artistic freedom of the text. Have you ever considered using "-ish" to mark the same non-standard approach? How would "bumby and frost heavish gravel road" sound?
1 hr
  -> "bumpy and frost broken" is the suggestion in the body of my answer. I agree that frost heavish sounds terrible, but I think that the first issue in the question is what tjällskott actually is, and then how to make it fit a literary context is secondary
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