diáspora

English translation: propagation/"cascading" of rules from different hierarchies

05:22 Sep 3, 2016
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Science - Science (general) / Hydrology
Spanish term or phrase: diáspora
It's a book on hydrogeology, but its author has a more literary style than your average scientist. He uses the following expression:

"una diáspora de normas de distinta jerarquía"

He is referring to different regulations that legislate on the hydrology of the study area. He probably means "a myriad of", but highlighting the fact that there isn't a unified code or law. I checked the Diccionario de la Real Academia Española, and "diáspora" does not seem to be used in that sense, but that's what sounds more logical to me... Here's the definition:

diáspora
1. f. Dispersión de los judíos exiliados de su país.
2. f. Dispersión de grupos humanos que abandonan su lugar de origen.

Now, I checked uses of "diaspora" in Google Scholar and I found this:

The decline and dispersion of marketing competence
FE Webster Jr, AJ Malter… - MIT Sloan Management …, 2005 - search.proquest.com
Abstract. In many companies, there has been a marked fall-off in the influence, stature and
significance of the corporate marketing department. Today, marketing is often less of a corporate
function and more a diaspora of skills and capabilities spread across the organization.

Of course, this one at least includes the idea of something (not people in this case) spreading across space. My example does not even entail any movement! Any thoughts on how to translate it? Maybe "scattered standards/regulations"? Thanks!!!
Cuiviewen
Local time: 11:11
English translation:propagation/"cascading" of rules from different hierarchies
Explanation:
One finds this sort of statement in computerised rule modeling studies. That's a very different are but it seems like the effect he is describing.

Cascading in brackets might work as it gives an image from hydrology.
Selected response from:

DLyons
Ireland
Local time: 14:11
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3 +2propagation/"cascading" of rules from different hierarchies
DLyons
3 +1acquis
Ana Vozone
3diaspore
Robert Carter
3chaotic jumble / farrago
Muriel Vasconcellos
3a parade of [rules/regulations/norms]
JohnMcDove


Discussion entries: 5





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
chaotic jumble / farrago


Explanation:
Personally, I don't think your author had checked out the meaning of the word. But the sense is clear. First I thought of words like:

mishmash
hodgepodge
patchwork

But then I decided that the situation calls for a sense of movement and drama (even though I never saw a piece of legislation running around).

Here's the definition of 'farrago' from my desktop version of Merriam Webster:

Main Entry:far£ra£go
Pronunciation:f**r*(*)g*, -r*(-, -ra(-
Function:noun
Inflected Form:-es
Etymology:Latin farragin-, farrago mixed fodder for cattle, mash, mixture, from far spelt * more at BARLEY

1 : MIXTURE, MEDLEY *a farrago of protein, fiber, and mineral salts— New Yorker*
2 a : a confused, disordered, or irrational assemblage (as of words or ideas) *his farrago of facts would need sifting— O.W.Holmes *1935* *arranged as *South is London of Brighton* they make a farrago which

Muriel Vasconcellos
United States
Local time: 06:11
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 56
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
a parade of [rules/regulations/norms]


Explanation:
Or perhaps "a miscellaneous parade of rules".

I understand the Spanish usage is very lax.

Some more context would be helpful, but your concept of "scattered regulations" seems to be the idea.

From my native Spanish viewpoint, such an usage does not sound too pedantic or particularly odd.

The other possible (less likely?) interpretation could be that these "regulations" start "going away" or "scattering away" and disappearing.

Now that I wrote the above, it'd very useful to have more context, as that second option would actually match better the basic meaning of "diáspora", even if taken figuratively.

Good luck!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2016-09-03 06:57:31 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The other possibilities could go in the direction of "a proliferation of regulations", or if you want "a mogollón" (colloquial register intended... ;-) "rules and regulations in droves" "aplenty" or your original "myriad of rules".

Such an usage (a bit stretched) may be sustained with a google search:

https://www.google.com/search?q="una diáspora de"&ie=utf-8&o...

https://actualidad.rt.com/actualidad/211297-farc-acuerdo-rec...

JohnMcDove
United States
Local time: 06:11
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
propagation/"cascading" of rules from different hierarchies


Explanation:
One finds this sort of statement in computerised rule modeling studies. That's a very different are but it seems like the effect he is describing.

Cascading in brackets might work as it gives an image from hydrology.

DLyons
Ireland
Local time: 14:11
Works in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 36
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  JohnMcDove: For want of some meaningful additional context, that's the "flow" I get from the original too... ;-)
9 hrs
  -> Thanks John.

agree  Isidora Ortiz: I like your proposal of "cascading" translates both the tone of the original, and the meaning of course. Thanks!
3 days 7 hrs
  -> Thanks Isidora.
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
acquis


Explanation:
Explanation:
A suggestion.

https://www.google.pt/?gws_rd=ssl#q="legal acquis"

http://www.linguee.com/english-spanish/search?query=acquis

http://www.linguee.com/english-spanish/search?source=auto&qu...



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 7 hrs (2016-09-03 13:00:29 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

@asker: I did not suggest "acquis communautaire", but merely "acquis" which means "acervo", in the sense of "repertorio", a group/variety/set of knowledge, legislation, etc.
http://www.significados.com/acervo/

Example sentence(s):
  • The Commission will also initiate and propose removal from the acquis of legislation which is clearly outdated and obsolete, either by formal ...
  • A large number of the Bilateral Agreements are based in different ways, but to a substantial degree on the EU legal acquis
Ana Vozone
Local time: 14:11
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese
Notes to answerer
Asker: Isn't this a very specific term? http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/acquis-communautaire


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  MPGS: This is probably what the author meant, not what she said :-)
38 mins
  -> Many thanks, it is my interpretation too...

neutral  Muriel Vasconcellos: The word isn't in the unabridged Merriam-Webster (US English). Also, I don't see that it fits the intent of the original.
2 hrs

neutral  philgoddard: This is an EU term.
4 hrs
  -> Being an EU term is not a crime... the term has been adopted and used for many years with a specific meaning which I think is equivalent to the term "diaspora" in this particular context.
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6 days   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
diaspore


Explanation:
The only thing I can think of is that the author is using the botanical meaning of "diáspora" (Wikipedia: "unidad estructural que permite a una planta propagarse") in a figurative sense, perhaps they are referring to a piece of legislation from which all kinds of rules and regulations have "sprung".

In botany, a diaspore is a plant dispersal unit consisting of a seed or spore plus any additional tissues that assist dispersal. In some seed plants, the diaspore is a seed and fruit together, or a seed and elaiosome.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diaspore_(botany)

In any case, it does have the benefit of being a legitimate translation of "diáspora".

Robert Carter
Mexico
Local time: 08:11
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
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