Te adoquín

English translation: I heart you.

17:18 Mar 26, 2010
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature
Spanish term or phrase: Te adoquín
Hola a todos. Sigo con la traducción de las obras de teatro. En este caso es una pareja de jóvenes de la ciudad de México que se mandan mensajes por celular y, en un momento él le escribe a ella "Te adoquín". Quiere decir "te adoro", de eso no hay duda, pero es una forma coloquial y juguetona. ¿Hay algo similar en inglés?

Les agradezco mucho de antemano cualquier ayuda y les deseo un buen fin de semana!
Aradai Pardo Martínez
Mexico
Local time: 12:25
English translation:I heart you.
Explanation:
That's a tough one. I can't think of a similar way to convey that particular play on words that would make sense in English.

We used to play variations of the "name game" as kids where you add extra syllables to names or words randomly or use popular culture references.
So something like:

I ava adore you.
I loveroo you.

Or there's the option of using homonyms.
Isle of ewe.

Currently there seems to be a trend where, when reading text messages aloud, kids say the symbol rather than the meaning.
Ie: "I am :)" becomes "I am smiley face".

So, "I heart you." instead of "I love you".

Just a couple of thoughts :)
Selected response from:

Michelle Temple
Canada
Local time: 11:25
Grading comment
Gracias Michelle,

Decidí usar "Isle of ewe"
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4I luv u!
Gilla Evans
3I door you
David Ronder
3I turtle dove u
Bubo Coroman (X)
3I heart you.
Michelle Temple
3I ore you
Sergio Campo


Discussion entries: 7





  

Answers


8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
I luv u!


Explanation:
if you want it in text-speak...

Gilla Evans
Local time: 18:25
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 72
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46 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
I ore you


Explanation:
I just thought the parallelism between this expression and the the ST could be amusing, having in mind the -maybe far-fetched- connection in meaning between "ore" and "adoquín" and the phonetic proximity between "ore" and "adore".

My 2 cents...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs (2010-03-26 20:27:20 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Following on Phil's comment, I am aware that this would not, without any other context, be understood by an English-speaking audience, just like the spanish expression wouldn't, either. I was just trying to come up with a phrase created by the same process as the spanish original. Let's remember that the only reason "adoquín" is in the ST is because of its vague phonetic similarity with "adoro". I think "ore" here could work because it is close, phonetically, to "adore", and maintains, loosely, the meaning of "adoquín" (adoquín->cobblestone = stone = mineral = ore).

I do not know if it would work, anyway, in English. It might in a context like this:

- Bye, honey. I'll call you tomorrow
- Hope so. I love you
- Me more. I ore you

if the reader is aware that this kind of play-on-words is normally used by the characters. What do you think?


Sergio Campo
Portugal
Local time: 18:25
Native speaker of: Spanish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  philgoddard: I don't understand this, so I'm not sure an English-speaking audience would.
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Phil. I understand your objection. See my note in the answer...
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
I heart you.


Explanation:
That's a tough one. I can't think of a similar way to convey that particular play on words that would make sense in English.

We used to play variations of the "name game" as kids where you add extra syllables to names or words randomly or use popular culture references.
So something like:

I ava adore you.
I loveroo you.

Or there's the option of using homonyms.
Isle of ewe.

Currently there seems to be a trend where, when reading text messages aloud, kids say the symbol rather than the meaning.
Ie: "I am :)" becomes "I am smiley face".

So, "I heart you." instead of "I love you".

Just a couple of thoughts :)

Michelle Temple
Canada
Local time: 11:25
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Gracias Michelle,

Decidí usar "Isle of ewe"
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

21 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
I turtle dove u


Explanation:
"turtle dove" is one of the ways of saying "love" in Cockney Rhyming Slang (East End of London), which seems similar to what they do in the DF!
http://www.cockneyrhymingslang.co.uk/english/alternatives/74...

Bubo Coroman (X)
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 151
Notes to answerer
Asker: Me encanta esta alternativa, Deborah, pero la traducción es para Canadá...

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1 day 23 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
I door you


Explanation:
...and why not?

Same principle: a heavy, banal object (paving stone, door) is made to carry the weight of passion simply because it sounds like the relevant love-verb. I think a native English speaker would get this pretty quickly.

The absurdity of lover-speak.

He could follow up with "You're a doorbell" (=adorable) if you got a chance to work that one in somewhere, though that's a bit less obvious.

David Ronder
United Kingdom
Local time: 18:25
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 16
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