\"test de la madre\"

English translation: novice test / mom test

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:test de la madre
English translation:novice test / mom test
Entered by: Charles Davis

01:41 Feb 14, 2017
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Marketing - Marketing / Market Research / Online content
Spanish term or phrase: \"test de la madre\"
I'm fairly sure I can't get away with a literal translation of this unreconstructed term, even if it did exist in English, which it doesn't appear to.

The context is talking about online payment methods and usability.

"Es lo que se conoce con el nombre del “test de la madre”: si mi madre es capaz de usarlo tendrá más posibilidades de convertirse en un medio de pago fácilmente adoptable por los usuarios, lo que facilitará su difusión."

I found some sites referring to the same idea as "the grandma test" (hey, both ageist and sexist!), but I wonder if anyone knows of a more PC version.
Or perhaps it's simply that marketing experts couldn't care less about being un-PC "within the trade" as it were.

Thanks in advance!
Robert Carter
Mexico
Local time: 16:10
novice test
Explanation:
For the rest of the sentence to work you've got to replace mother with another type of user, and it's got to be a type of person who would actually use the service, so not children. But making it women, old people or even stupid people is inevitably going to be denigrating to some class of person.

But "novice" might get round the difficulty. Being a novice in using a computer isn't taken as reflecting poorly on your intellectual acuity; in fact for some people it's a badge of honour. It is a bit "descafeinado", but that's the trouble with trying not to offend anybody. And now that you tell us it's for a university text book, I think it would be rather crass to lapse into disciminatory stereotypes, whatever one thinks about so-called "PC" language.

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Note added at 19 hrs (2017-02-14 21:40:08 GMT)
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Hi Robert. I see your point about "lo que se conoce con el nombre de", which clearly requires an established expression like "mom test". If the client agrees to make it "novice test", or indeed any other alternative, I think you'd just cut that bit and say "It's the 'X test'", rather than "It's what's known as the 'X test'". It would really matter, in my opinion.
Selected response from:

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 23:10
Grading comment
I think this is the most helpful translation for future reference, even though "mom test" is strictly the correct term. Thanks again, Charles, and to everyone else for all the useful info and input!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3 +3granny-proof
Wendy Streitparth
3 +2novice test
Charles Davis
4idiot test
Nedra Rivera
3usual useless/hopeless people test / the cybernetic illiterate test
JohnMcDove
3"... for dummies"
Francisco Herrerias


Discussion entries: 14





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
"... for dummies"


Explanation:
One fairly common option showing it is appropriate for even the most inexperienced...
I hope your context allows usage of this option.

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Note added at 1 hr (2017-02-14 03:23:26 GMT)
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One advantage is that it is not sexist nor ageist.

Francisco Herrerias
United States
Local time: 14:10
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
granny-proof


Explanation:
I know most of you will discard this as not PC, but I personally find the restrictions in that direction are verging on the ridiculous.

Wendy Streitparth
Germany
Local time: 23:10
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  neilmac: Yes. I can just imagine phil's Rip van Winkle suggestion being decried as offensive to narcolepsy sufferers....
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Neil.

neutral  philgoddard: They're not ridiculous, and nor are they restrictions. It's showing basic respect for other people.
8 hrs
  -> OK, but I for one probably fall into the "granny-proof" category and I don't see anything objectionable about it.

agree  Marie Wilson: Or granny-friendly
12 hrs
  -> Yes, that's definitely a more positive version!

agree  JohnMcDove: Grannies of yesteryear may be now babies or 5 year old kids (I am referring to my mom, who departed her old body 5 years ago...) knowing nothing cyber-wise. Now she may be showing great skill with an iPad... But I am getting too philosophic here. :-)
1 day 19 hrs
  -> Thanks, John. With a willing mind and a patient teacher.....
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
idiot test


Explanation:
Only offensive to idiots!

Hope this helps.

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Note added at 18 hrs (2017-02-14 20:40:54 GMT)
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or "mom test / mum test" as discussed above

Nedra Rivera
United States
Local time: 14:10
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 27
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18 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
novice test


Explanation:
For the rest of the sentence to work you've got to replace mother with another type of user, and it's got to be a type of person who would actually use the service, so not children. But making it women, old people or even stupid people is inevitably going to be denigrating to some class of person.

But "novice" might get round the difficulty. Being a novice in using a computer isn't taken as reflecting poorly on your intellectual acuity; in fact for some people it's a badge of honour. It is a bit "descafeinado", but that's the trouble with trying not to offend anybody. And now that you tell us it's for a university text book, I think it would be rather crass to lapse into disciminatory stereotypes, whatever one thinks about so-called "PC" language.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 19 hrs (2017-02-14 21:40:08 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Hi Robert. I see your point about "lo que se conoce con el nombre de", which clearly requires an established expression like "mom test". If the client agrees to make it "novice test", or indeed any other alternative, I think you'd just cut that bit and say "It's the 'X test'", rather than "It's what's known as the 'X test'". It would really matter, in my opinion.

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 23:10
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 64
Grading comment
I think this is the most helpful translation for future reference, even though "mom test" is strictly the correct term. Thanks again, Charles, and to everyone else for all the useful info and input!
Notes to answerer
Asker: Hi, Charles. Yes, this is a really good option, and the reasons you mention are why I originally favoured Phil's idea of "basic computer literacy". "Novice" is clearly more succinct, and I'm sure Phil wouldn't object to that! The only problem I have now is that "mom test" actually appears to be a "thing" in this field, so now I'm a little unsure what to do about it, particularly as the source text reads "Es lo que se conoce con el nombre del “test de la madre”".


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Nedra Rivera: Didn't notice this early. I like it!
22 mins
  -> Thanks a lot, Nedra :)

agree  JohnMcDove: When we get to remember our distant past, few centuries ago, or so, we'll realize how old some babies are... ;-) // No, no, no, no. Sorry, I beg to differ, that would be VERY offensive to all the people named "Charles" with an IQ above 200. ;-))
1 day 6 hrs
  -> They could call it the Charles test; that would work well :-)
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2 days 1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
usual useless/hopeless people test / the cybernetic illiterate test


Explanation:
If your average cybernetic illiterate Joe can do it, then you can do it...

If an illiterate Spaniard like me can figure it out, then anyone can.

My two bytes!

How was the saying?

You can not teach an old mouse new clicks? (Or words to that effect... ;-)

Aha! The "old mouse test"... Sorry, scratch that one, it will be very offensive to mice!

JohnMcDove
United States
Local time: 14:10
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
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