se me volaron los pájaros

English translation: I got carried away

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:se me volaron los pájaros
English translation:I got carried away
Entered by: Charles Davis

20:06 Mar 11, 2014
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Idioms / Maxims / Sayings
Spanish term or phrase: se me volaron los pájaros
Talking about conscious awareness of certain reactions as opposed to being unaware of what is producing these reactions.

–¿Cómo puede ser que se llegue a tener consciencia de algo que no es consciente?

–En cierto sentido es como usted sugiere, no se tiene consciencia, al menos no una consciencia vivencial que llegue manifiestamente a la corteza cerebral, que es la que registra una carga afectiva y emocional cuando se experimenta un hecho de la vida cotidiana por simple que sea como rascarse o tomar agua. En cambio, puede adquirirse una consciencia intelectual, especialmente si uno está atento a que ciertas reacciones nuestras nos llaman la atención porque exceden lo que nosotros mismos consideramos razonable.

Hay un dicho popular que grafica esto de una manera simbólica inmejorable, para significar que algo superó nuestra intención racional se suele decir que “se me volaron los pájaros”, o sea actué de una manera inesperada e incontrolable.

I understand the concept but can't come up with a suitable equivalent in English. Any ideas?
David Hollywood
Local time: 04:55
I got carried away
Explanation:
This is the nearest I can think of, and I think it's more or less what it means, though it's less picturesque than the Spanish (which I find as "se me volaron los patos" too).

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 26 mins (2014-03-11 20:33:12 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

In Argentina, at least, it often seems to be used to mean "I lost my temper" or "I lost my rag" or just "I lost it", though I don't think that's quite what it means in your context.

"Se me volaron los pajaritos...!!
... Estimados amigos de FN, no es que estè enojado ni mucho menos (lo digo por el tìtulo del post), es que literalmente se me volaron los pajaritos... les comento: "
He goes on to say that the birds literally flew away while he was trying to photograph them, but the first part shows what the expected metaphorical meaning would be here.
http://www.fotonat.org/showthread.php?bid=2&threadid=1585

But the more general "get carried away" idea is suggested by this, about an Argentine diputada:

"A mi no se me volaron los pajaritos por ser diputada nacional"
http://www.eldiariodelapampa.com.ar/index.php?option=com_con...

In other words, I've still got my feet on the ground, I haven't lost touch with what I believe in.
Selected response from:

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 09:55
Grading comment
twas hard to decide here and thanks for all the input ... I've gone with Charles as it best fits the overall context ... thanks again to all :)
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +8I got carried away
Charles Davis
3 +2I don't know what came over me/ I was acting on pure impulse
Carol Gullidge
4 +1I lost it!
Blanca Collazo
4I lost out in a jiffy
jude dabo
3the engine rules the man
DLyons


Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
I don't know what came over me/ I was acting on pure impulse


Explanation:
By the time I realised what I'd done/said, it was too late

---

by no means a direct translation, but could work in the context.

If the saying applies to something you said (by mistake) rather than an action, you could use something like "the words just flew out of my mouth", "it just came out", or "I just couldn't stop myself"

Carol Gullidge
United Kingdom
Local time: 08:55
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 138

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Pablo Julián Davis: Good one (your first proposal is the one that I think really works)
5 hrs
  -> many thanks Pablo - I agree :)

agree  Jenniferts
5 hrs
  -> many thanks Jenniferts!
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18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
the engine rules the man


Explanation:
Or "Above control. I'm in a raging storm,
Where seas and skies are blended"

Both from Isaac Watts, "Reliquiae Juveniles". I feel a rather flowery, poetic answer is appropriate.


    Reference: http://metaphors.lib.virginia.edu/metaphors/11918
DLyons
Ireland
Local time: 08:55
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 20
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19 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
I lost it!


Explanation:
...

Blanca Collazo
Puerto Rico
Local time: 03:55
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Carol Gullidge: I like this even better!
2 mins

neutral  Charles Davis: This is quite often what it means (that is, I lost my temper, I got uncontrollably angry), but not always, and I think not here.
8 mins
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9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +8
I got carried away


Explanation:
This is the nearest I can think of, and I think it's more or less what it means, though it's less picturesque than the Spanish (which I find as "se me volaron los patos" too).

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 26 mins (2014-03-11 20:33:12 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

In Argentina, at least, it often seems to be used to mean "I lost my temper" or "I lost my rag" or just "I lost it", though I don't think that's quite what it means in your context.

"Se me volaron los pajaritos...!!
... Estimados amigos de FN, no es que estè enojado ni mucho menos (lo digo por el tìtulo del post), es que literalmente se me volaron los pajaritos... les comento: "
He goes on to say that the birds literally flew away while he was trying to photograph them, but the first part shows what the expected metaphorical meaning would be here.
http://www.fotonat.org/showthread.php?bid=2&threadid=1585

But the more general "get carried away" idea is suggested by this, about an Argentine diputada:

"A mi no se me volaron los pajaritos por ser diputada nacional"
http://www.eldiariodelapampa.com.ar/index.php?option=com_con...

In other words, I've still got my feet on the ground, I haven't lost touch with what I believe in.

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 09:55
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 123
Grading comment
twas hard to decide here and thanks for all the input ... I've gone with Charles as it best fits the overall context ... thanks again to all :)

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Carol Gullidge: I think this works!
6 mins
  -> Thanks, Carol! It's what came to mind browsing through examples of the expression. I ought to add a bit of backup.

agree  Robert Forstag: Because the present case bears no relation to any concrete circumstance and only calls for a *generic equivalent*, this would seem to be a safe choice. (For example, "I lost it" often refers specifically to anger or sorrow (at least in US English).
21 mins
  -> In UK English too. Thank you, Robert!

agree  JH Trads
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Hugo!

agree  Rachel Fell
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Rachel!

agree  David Ronder
1 hr
  -> Thanks, David!

agree  Rachael West
12 hrs
  -> Thanks, Rachael!

agree  Gilla Evans
13 hrs
  -> Thanks, Gilla!

agree  MollyRose
20 hrs
  -> Thanks, Molly!
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16 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
I lost out in a jiffy


Explanation:
cheers

jude dabo
Local time: 08:55
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
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