Contaré agora de lo quen Cuzco habia cuando en él entramos.

English translation: now

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:agora (in this context)
English translation:now
Entered by: Rafael Molina Pulgar

03:55 Aug 30, 2010
    The asker opted for community grading. The question was closed on 2010-09-02 15:54:10 based on peer agreement (or, if there were too few peer comments, asker preference.)


Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - History / spanish conquest of inca's empire
Spanish term or phrase: Contaré agora de lo quen Cuzco habia cuando en él entramos.
The term "agora" is an old form of current "ahora" - how should it be translated to old english??
Cecilia Noriega
Local time: 22:11
now
Explanation:
Between "nu" and "now" there isnt' any form that a present day English speaker could understand today. I would say that in this particular translation you lose the old flavor, but you can compensate in another sentence or segment.

This is the etymology of the word "now":
now
O.E. nu, common Gmc. (cf. O.N. nu, Du. nu, O.Fris. nu, Ger. nun, Goth. nu "now"), from PIE *nu (cf. Skt., Avestan nu, O.Pers. nuram, Hittite nuwa, Gk. nu, nun, L. nunc, O.C.S. nyne, Lith. nu, O.Ir. nu-). Often merely emphatic; non-temporal usage (cf. Now, then) was in O.E. The adj. meaning "up to date" first recorded 1967.
Selected response from:

Rafael Molina Pulgar
Mexico
Local time: 22:11
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +7now
Rafael Molina Pulgar
3 +1Presently
Gad Kohenov
3
Bubo Coroman (X)


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5


Explanation:
nú (now)
http://babaev.tripod.com/archive/grammar42.html

instead of a tilde other dictionaries etc. have a straight horizontal line


Bubo Coroman (X)
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 82
Notes to answerer
Asker: Tanks Deborah

Asker: I meant thanks ... :)

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18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +7
now


Explanation:
Between "nu" and "now" there isnt' any form that a present day English speaker could understand today. I would say that in this particular translation you lose the old flavor, but you can compensate in another sentence or segment.

This is the etymology of the word "now":
now
O.E. nu, common Gmc. (cf. O.N. nu, Du. nu, O.Fris. nu, Ger. nun, Goth. nu "now"), from PIE *nu (cf. Skt., Avestan nu, O.Pers. nuram, Hittite nuwa, Gk. nu, nun, L. nunc, O.C.S. nyne, Lith. nu, O.Ir. nu-). Often merely emphatic; non-temporal usage (cf. Now, then) was in O.E. The adj. meaning "up to date" first recorded 1967.

Rafael Molina Pulgar
Mexico
Local time: 22:11
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks Rafael.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Constantinos Faridis (X): simple cuestión de vocabulario...
1 hr
  -> Gracias, Constantinos.

agree  Lydia De Jorge
2 hrs
  -> Gracias, Lydia. Viniendo de usted.

agree  Carol Gullidge: as you say, compensation elsewhere could be key here. Also, it would be risky to try to use "old English" without knowing just how "old" it should be. I would think "nu" probably dates back too far for the context
4 hrs
  -> Gracias; estoy de acuerdo contigo, Carol.

agree  delat
4 hrs
  -> Gracias, delat.

agree  Richard Boulter: Agree, but thanks to both you and Deborah for the etymology, which can always come in handy on some future project, too. In this case, the writer could have meant 'right now/next sentence' or 'presently/ somewhere below'. The translator know.
7 hrs
  -> Gracias por tu comentario, Richard.

agree  Mirtha Grotewold
8 hrs
  -> Gracias, Mirtha.

agree  Margarita Gonzalez: De acuerdo y saludos, Ragael.
9 hrs
  -> Gracias, Marga.
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23 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Presently


Explanation:
Maybe not that old but agora always meant now or presently. It's still the word for now in Portuguese.

Gad Kohenov
Israel
Local time: 06:11
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench, Native in HebrewHebrew
PRO pts in category: 36
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks desertfox.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Fiona Kirton
4 hrs
  -> Thanks a lot!!

disagree  ormiston: presently does not mean now (a common mistake even among English speakers). It means soon or in the near future.
5 hrs

agree  Richard Boulter: Especially since the writer bothered to say 'agora', he/she may have meant 'presently/ somewhere below'. Depends on whether the next sentence begins the account or not. The translator will know. :-)
7 hrs
  -> Muchas gracias!
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