Doctor de estado

English translation: Docteur d\'État (Ph.D.)

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:Doctor de estado
English translation:Docteur d\'État (Ph.D.)
Entered by: Laurent Slowack

21:44 Jan 16, 2016
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Science - Certificates, Diplomas, Licenses, CVs / Doctorados
Spanish term or phrase: Doctor de estado
Solamente un título entre tantos del cliente.
Alguna idea? Gracias por su aportación.
Laurent Slowack
Docteur d'État (Ph.D.)
Explanation:
I have never seen this expression referring to anything other than a French doctorate and I am sure this must be true in the case you are dealing with. It is common practice in Spanish to translate the names of foreign degrees in CVs, and you can find a number of cases on the Internet of people from Spanish-speaking countries who have taken a doctorate in France calling themselves "Doctor de estado", though they are actually "Docteur d'État".

In English, however, it is not customary to translate the names of foreign degrees like this; or rather, it is customary to put the original French (or other) degree title and then put an English equivalent in parentheses. To omit the original title or translate it literally ("State Doctor") would look very unprofessional.

So I think what you should do, assuming this is indeed a French degree (and that should be clear from the CV) is to translate it back into the original French as "Docteur d'État" and then add "Ph.D." in parentheses. Here is an example in a French scholar's CV in English:

"Education: Docteur d’état ès Sciences (Ph. D. in biological sciences)"
http://ec.europa.eu/health/archive/ph_risk/committees/sct/do...

(By the way, this person has put état with lower case, but it should be capitalised, as indeed should "biological sciences".)

The equivalent is simply Ph.D. In British English (my native variety) this abbreviation almost invariably appears nowadays without points (PhD), but in American English it is still more common to spell it with points (Ph.D.), so it depends whether the primary target is American or European.

I am old enough to remember the French "minor" doctorate, called Doctorat de Troisième Cycle, which was abolished in 1984. In the old days, a Doctorat d'État in the humanities was a formidable task which commonly took 8-10 years of hard work to complete. Since the system was simplified in 1984, there is only one kind of doctorate, and it's really comparable to a PhD (harder to get than PhDs in some places, but essentially the same). I don't think there's any need to specify further. One of the main reasons for giving the original degree title is that people in the academic world know what a Docteur d'État is.

It would be wrong just to put PhD. This person does not hold a PhD; he/she holds a degree equivalent to a PhD. There's an important difference. This point is applicable to degree titles generally.
Selected response from:

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 07:29
Grading comment
It is indeed a French holder.
Many thanks.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +1Docteur d'État (Ph.D.)
Charles Davis
4State Diploma of Doctor holder
Francois Boye
3(equivalent)PH.d
lugoben
Summary of reference entries provided
Taña Dalglish

  

Answers


30 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
State Diploma of Doctor holder


Explanation:
my take

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 33 mins (2016-01-16 22:17:58 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

In line with Ph.D. holder

Francois Boye
United States
Local time: 01:29
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 24
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
(equivalent)PH.d


Explanation:
Este título es comparable a los doctorados de universidad, pero nunca a los doctorados de especialidad (o de tercer ciclo) introducidos en Francia en 1897 y 1954, ya que según las propias autoridades de las universidades que los emitieron, no se corresponden con el nivel de exigencia de los Doctorados de Estado, y por el contrario esos doctorados denominados de Tercer Ciclo, vienen a ser equivalentes a un título de pregrado aun cuando en algunos países, se les ha dado el valor equivocado. Estas titulaciones fueron unificadas en 1984, por lo que **Ph.D es hoy día equivalente al Doctorado de Estado francés**, que son distintos a los denominados del Tercer Ciclo o de Especialidad, según lo expresan las mismas autoridades académicas de la Universidad de La Sorbona, cuyas declaraciones están publicadas en la internet.
https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philosophiæ_doctor

Before 1984 three research doctorates existed in France: the state doctorate **(doctorat d'État, the old doctorate introduced in 1808)**, the third cycle doctorate (doctorat de troisième cycle, created in 1954 and shorter than the state doctorate) and the diploma of doctor-engineer (diplôme de docteur-ingénieur created in 1923), for technical research. After 1984, only one type of doctoral degree remained, called "doctorate" (Doctorat). The latter is equivalent to the Ph.D.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doctor_of_Philosophy

lugoben
Local time: 01:29
Native speaker of: Spanish
PRO pts in category: 8
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Docteur d'État (Ph.D.)


Explanation:
I have never seen this expression referring to anything other than a French doctorate and I am sure this must be true in the case you are dealing with. It is common practice in Spanish to translate the names of foreign degrees in CVs, and you can find a number of cases on the Internet of people from Spanish-speaking countries who have taken a doctorate in France calling themselves "Doctor de estado", though they are actually "Docteur d'État".

In English, however, it is not customary to translate the names of foreign degrees like this; or rather, it is customary to put the original French (or other) degree title and then put an English equivalent in parentheses. To omit the original title or translate it literally ("State Doctor") would look very unprofessional.

So I think what you should do, assuming this is indeed a French degree (and that should be clear from the CV) is to translate it back into the original French as "Docteur d'État" and then add "Ph.D." in parentheses. Here is an example in a French scholar's CV in English:

"Education: Docteur d’état ès Sciences (Ph. D. in biological sciences)"
http://ec.europa.eu/health/archive/ph_risk/committees/sct/do...

(By the way, this person has put état with lower case, but it should be capitalised, as indeed should "biological sciences".)

The equivalent is simply Ph.D. In British English (my native variety) this abbreviation almost invariably appears nowadays without points (PhD), but in American English it is still more common to spell it with points (Ph.D.), so it depends whether the primary target is American or European.

I am old enough to remember the French "minor" doctorate, called Doctorat de Troisième Cycle, which was abolished in 1984. In the old days, a Doctorat d'État in the humanities was a formidable task which commonly took 8-10 years of hard work to complete. Since the system was simplified in 1984, there is only one kind of doctorate, and it's really comparable to a PhD (harder to get than PhDs in some places, but essentially the same). I don't think there's any need to specify further. One of the main reasons for giving the original degree title is that people in the academic world know what a Docteur d'État is.

It would be wrong just to put PhD. This person does not hold a PhD; he/she holds a degree equivalent to a PhD. There's an important difference. This point is applicable to degree titles generally.

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 07:29
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 483
Grading comment
It is indeed a French holder.
Many thanks.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  lorenab23: :-)
1 day 2 hrs
  -> Many thanks, Lorena. Abrazos :)

neutral  Francois Boye: How do you know that it's the case of a French degree?
1 day 11 hrs
  -> Read my answer. I have said that it will need to be confirmed by looking at the CV. But I do not believe that this term is used anywhere but France. I have looked for examples from other countries and found none. So I am very confident that it is French.
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Reference comments


42 mins
Reference

Reference information:
A previous glossary entry:
http://www.proz.com/kudoz/spanish_to_english/other/234953-do...
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase: doctor de estado
English translation: Doctor d'Etat (Ph.D.)
Officially or Government Approved Ph.D. (Doctorate)

Taña Dalglish
Jamaica
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 206
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