Мишка/Михаил Потапович

English translation: Mikhail (or Mishka) The Bear/Potapovich The Bear

20:13 Dec 5, 2008
Russian to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Folklore
Russian term or phrase: Мишка/Михаил Потапович
Тhis is for subtitles in a Russian nature documentary about bears. The challenge is hitting on a set of terms which convey Мишка, косолапый, Микайл Потапович.
Stephen C. Farrand
United States
Local time: 01:42
English translation:Mikhail (or Mishka) The Bear/Potapovich The Bear
Explanation:
Stephen,

Sometimes you stumble upon an absolutely untranslatable term. These words - Мишка/Михаил Потапович - bring memories to any Russian who was read or told folk tales as a child. In Russian tales, the Bear sometimes is not only clumsy, but also easily fooled; but sometimes he helps the hero out of great difficulty. He is hardly ever mean (unlike the Wolf) or crafty (unlike the Fox).

Try as you might, there is no there is no cultural equivalent for the American viewers of the documentary. I thought about Yogi Bear or Berenstain Bears, but it's simply not the same, and will just puzzle the audience: what Yogi Bear/Berenstain Bears are doing in a Russian documentary?

Therefore, I respectfully suggest that you simply transliterate the proper name and add "The Bear".

Good luck!
Selected response from:

Alexandra Goldburt
Local time: 22:42
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3 +3Teddy
Mark Berelekhis
3 +2Mikhail (or Mishka) The Bear/Potapovich The Bear
Alexandra Goldburt
5Bruin
Vlad Shamail (X)
4Grumbly-Rumbly
Andrew Vdovin
3сlumsy little bear
Ellen Kraus
3Boss Bear
koundelev


  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
Мишка/Михайл Потапович
Teddy


Explanation:
Collectively: clumsy clumsy Teddy, ala hungry hungry Hippos.

In this case, I feel it's best to localize.

Mark Berelekhis
United States
Local time: 01:42
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian, Native in EnglishEnglish
Notes to answerer
Asker: Спасибо большое, Марк!


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Mylord
16 mins
  -> Thank you, Mylord. ++ Hey, I just got that! :D

agree  Alexandra Taggart: Teddy, splayfootty, Michael the Tapper - becouse the name Potap sounds simular
1 hr
  -> Thank you, Alexondra.

agree  Samantha Payn: Teddy for Мишка and Edward Bear for Михайл Потапович might work.
16 hrs
  -> Thank you, Samantha.
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16 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Мишка/Михайл Потапович
Bruin


Explanation:
The actual folklore name for a bear
References below


    Reference: http://www.freedictionary.com/bruin
Vlad Shamail (X)
United States
Local time: 01:42
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in RussianRussian
Notes to answerer
Asker: Спасибо большое, Владимир! Historically, you are absolutely right. Americans however will think of sports teams.

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40 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Мишка/Михайл Потапович
сlumsy little bear


Explanation:
would correspond to < косолапый >

Ellen Kraus
Austria
Local time: 07:42
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
Notes to answerer
Asker: Спасибо большое, Эллен!

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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Мишка/Михайл Потапович
Boss Bear


Explanation:
для Михаила Потаповича - хозяина леса

koundelev
Local time: 08:42
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in category: 4
Notes to answerer
Asker: Вас благодарю, Жорж!

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8 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Grumbly-Rumbly


Explanation:
ИЛИ:
Grumbly-Rumbly the Bear

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 hrs (2008-12-06 04:51:55 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

... We are Crunch-Munch the Mouse, Hop-Stop the Frog, Fleet-Feet the Rabbit, Smily-Wily the Fox, Howly-Prowly the Wolf and Grumbly-Rumbly the Bear. ...
www.4to40.com/folktales/default.asp?keyword=&category=&coun...

Andrew Vdovin
Local time: 12:42
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in category: 8
Notes to answerer
Asker: Спасибо большое, Эндрю!

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9 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Mikhail (or Mishka) The Bear/Potapovich The Bear


Explanation:
Stephen,

Sometimes you stumble upon an absolutely untranslatable term. These words - Мишка/Михаил Потапович - bring memories to any Russian who was read or told folk tales as a child. In Russian tales, the Bear sometimes is not only clumsy, but also easily fooled; but sometimes he helps the hero out of great difficulty. He is hardly ever mean (unlike the Wolf) or crafty (unlike the Fox).

Try as you might, there is no there is no cultural equivalent for the American viewers of the documentary. I thought about Yogi Bear or Berenstain Bears, but it's simply not the same, and will just puzzle the audience: what Yogi Bear/Berenstain Bears are doing in a Russian documentary?

Therefore, I respectfully suggest that you simply transliterate the proper name and add "The Bear".

Good luck!

Alexandra Goldburt
Local time: 22:42
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in category: 4
Notes to answerer
Asker: Вас благодарю, Александра! I agree--note that, while "Bruin" comes from English versions of Reynard the Fox, here in the US B'rer Bear is a very negative character: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brer_Bear .


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tokyo_Moscow
19 mins
  -> Thank you, Tokyo_Moscow!

agree  Alexander Kondorsky: Mikhailo Potapov, the Bear
1 day 11 hrs
  -> "Mikhailo Potapov, the Bear" sounds good to me! Спасибо, Александр!
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