Ябеда-корябеда!

English translation: tattle-tale

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Russian term or phrase:ябеда-корябеда (детск.)
English translation:tattle-tale
Entered by: Andrew Vdovin

15:41 Dec 27, 2002
Russian to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary
Russian term or phrase: Ябеда-корябеда!
Это в добавление к "жадине-говядине". Есть ли что-либо подобное в английском? Естественно, выражение должно употребляться в детской речи.
Andrew Vdovin
Local time: 16:01
tattle-tale
Explanation:
used by kids
Selected response from:

Alexandra Tussing
Grading comment
Thanks for your answer!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +4cobber dobber
Igor Kreknin
4 +3tattle-tale
Alexandra Tussing
4 +3dirty tell-tale
Libero_Lang_Lab
5 +1the evil female magician named "Yabeda-koryabeda"
David Welch
4 +2sneaky-pants
David Knowles
5Not for grading - clarification
Alexandra Tussing
5tittle tat
Irene Chernenko
4 +1snitch-witch
Deborah Hoffman
4A rat-fink
Emil Tubinshlak


Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


36 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
sneaky-pants


Explanation:
kind of goes with greedy-guts!

David Knowles
Local time: 10:01
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 5081

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Libero_Lang_Lab: sounds good
6 mins

agree  Alexandra Tussing
1 hr
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44 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
the evil female magician named "Yabeda-koryabeda"


Explanation:
ябеда-корябеда = Slander-disaster (more or less)

see:

А. Семенов. "12 Агентов Ябеды- ...
... Злая волшебница Ябеда-Корябеда проснулась
ещё затемно. ... Желаю успеха. Ябеда-Корябеда. ...
kindergarden.ykt.ru/BOOKS/agents1178.htm


жадине-говядине = beef-glutton


the idea would be to have lines that rhyme, ie here would be an example that I have thought up:


Slander-disaster and piggy-wiggy

David Welch
United States
Local time: 05:01
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 59

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Alexandra Tussing: it doesn't seem to make sense
1 hr
  -> Di you read the reference?

agree  Elaine Freeland (X): THis SEmenov fellow simply used an already existing word/name to name his wiched witch. He was too lazy to come up with one of his own! :-)
5 hrs
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45 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
dirty tell-tale


Explanation:
someone who tells tales about others

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-12-27 16:27:59 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

or maybe: snake-in-the-grass

Libero_Lang_Lab
United Kingdom
Local time: 10:01
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 1214

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Montefiore
4 hrs

agree  Alexandra Tussing
13 hrs

agree  Teresa Pearce: "Tell-tale" was my first thought, too... but why "dirty"?
16 hrs
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49 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
cobber dobber


Explanation:
http://www.math.iastate.edu/burkardt/wordplay/itty_bitty.htm...
ITTY BITTY: Rhyming Nonsense
cobber dobber (an informer)

http://www.ozstatic.com/au_grm.htm
cobber dobber-a person who informs on a friend

Igor Kreknin
Local time: 12:01
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in pair: 328

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Libero_Lang_Lab: sounds lovely - but it is very obscure - possibly some old Victorian slang - I like it but I doubt it will mean very much to most modern-day English readers
2 mins

agree  Irene Chernenko: Actually, "dobber" is very Australian. We would say "You're a bloody dobber!"
20 mins

agree  Nikita Kobrin: Только детское ли это?
3 hrs

agree  Elaine Freeland (X): w/Nikita and Irene: see http://www.artistwd.com/joyzine/australia/strine/c.htm
5 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
tittle tat


Explanation:
This is the one we used to chant at a kid who snitched, either repeating it over and over, or getting creative:

Tittle tat
Dirty rat
Sitting on a lump of fat!

Irene Chernenko
Russian Federation
Local time: 12:01
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in pair: 259
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
tattle-tale


Explanation:
used by kids

Alexandra Tussing
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 58
Grading comment
Thanks for your answer!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Nikita Kobrin
1 hr
  -> Thanks!

agree  xeni (X)
2 hrs
  -> Thank you!

agree  Montefiore
2 hrs
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
snitch-witch


Explanation:
mozhno tak? (or snitch-bitch, if you grew up in my neighborhood :-)


Or possibly "tattle-tale" combined with something, perhaps "tattle-tale, ate a snail" "tattle-tale, went to jail" or "tattle-tale, fat as a whale."

Deborah Hoffman
Local time: 05:01
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 403

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Alexandra Tussing
11 hrs
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
A rat-fink


Explanation:
I know it doesn't rhyme, but I came across it someplace, and it sounds just like what kids would use..

Emil Tubinshlak
Canada
Local time: 05:01
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 153
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14 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Not for grading - clarification


Explanation:
Dear Mr. Welch,
Yes, I read your reference. Unfortunately, you are somewhat misled by it. The writer used this word ("tattle-tale") as a name for his witch character. So that phrase would read something like: Evil witch Tattle Tale woke up before dawn...

About "Slander-disaster": you are trying to translate the words literally, while it doesn't really work here. Yabeda means a snitch. Koryabeda does not have any literal meaning, it's just a made-up word so as to make it rhyme, so throwing away the first part and translating the second (beda - trouble, disaster) - does not work either. I hope this clarifies the reason I was not so enthusiastic about your answer.
Have a great weekend,
AT


Alexandra Tussing
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 58
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