fechando uma abóbada

English translation: capping a dome/laying the capstone of a work/capping a work

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Portuguese term or phrase:fechando uma abóbada
English translation:capping a dome/laying the capstone of a work/capping a work

12:09 Jul 3, 2014
    The asker opted for community grading. The question was closed on 2014-07-07 10:54:11 based on peer agreement (or, if there were too few peer comments, asker preference.)


Portuguese to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary - Art, Arts & Crafts, Painting
Portuguese term or phrase: fechando uma abóbada
The phrase is used in the sentence: O novo sítio Web que agora se disponibiliza ao público – com o apoio generoso da XYZ – complementa o investimento feito pelo ABC nas redes sociais, na inovação tecnológica e, em geral, na área da comunicação, fechando uma abóbada delineada em 2010 e implementada pela grande equipa que, dia a dia, faz o ABC museu.

The phrase 'fechando uma abóbada' is used in a formal announcement / PR piece written by a museum director. How should I translate it? The best I have come up with so far is "completing a vault" but that sounds so wrong. There must be a figurative meaning that I am unfamiliar with. I also considered "the final piece in a jigsaw" or "closing a gap" but essentially, I'm just guessing.

Does anyone know what it means and how best to translate it into English?
juliedawnfox
Portugal
Local time: 17:27
capping a dome/laying the capstone of a work/capping a work
Explanation:
Please see my discussion entry first.
The expression "fechar uma/a abóbada/cúpula" is usually translated as "to cap a/the dome", at least in Construction.
Using this expression the translation becomes: "..., capping a dome outlined in 2010...".
You can also translate to: "..., laying the capstone of a work outlined in 2010" (because "work" also has the sense of "building" and "job" and "effort" and "labour"); here, I think you can use "capping" instead of "laying the capstone", although this one really holds the metaphorical sense of the original phrase.
Selected response from:

Vitor Pinteus
Portugal
Local time: 17:27
Grading comment
Thanks, Vitor. I think your answer, combined with Mario Freitas' insights and suggestions, has enabled me to make a decision. I'm going with 'capping a dome'.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +1capping a dome/laying the capstone of a work/capping a work
Vitor Pinteus
4laying the keystone
Nick Taylor
3 +1completing a process
Richard Purdom
4enclosing/consolidating/completing the dome
Mario Freitas


Discussion entries: 9





  

Answers


14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
enclosing/consolidating/completing the dome


Explanation:
"Abóboda" (dome) is a metaphor here. IMO, the intent is to mention that the new site is the final touch to close or consolidate the structure of the entire enterprise or project.
You could use shelter, structure, cover or many other options, but I would keept the "dome" and the respective metaphor to keep the mood of the context.

Mario Freitas
Brazil
Local time: 13:27
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 104
Notes to answerer
Asker: I agree, Mario. Especially because I need to refer to the arc in the following sentence. With your help and Vitor's, I've decided to go with 'capping the dome'. Much appreciated.

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16 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
completing a process


Explanation:
...your jigsaw idea would be fine too imho.

Richard Purdom
Portugal
Local time: 17:27
Works in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Verginia Ophof: http://www.seadict.com/pt/en/abóbada
39 mins
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7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
laying the keystone


Explanation:
laying the keystone (quite literal but it fits IMO)

Nick Taylor
Local time: 17:27
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 91
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16 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
capping a dome/laying the capstone of a work/capping a work


Explanation:
Please see my discussion entry first.
The expression "fechar uma/a abóbada/cúpula" is usually translated as "to cap a/the dome", at least in Construction.
Using this expression the translation becomes: "..., capping a dome outlined in 2010...".
You can also translate to: "..., laying the capstone of a work outlined in 2010" (because "work" also has the sense of "building" and "job" and "effort" and "labour"); here, I think you can use "capping" instead of "laying the capstone", although this one really holds the metaphorical sense of the original phrase.



    Reference: http://quizlet.com/17173662/western-civ-ids-exam-3-flash-car...
    Reference: http://www.biblestudytools.com/dictionaries/bakers-evangelic...
Vitor Pinteus
Portugal
Local time: 17:27
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Thanks, Vitor. I think your answer, combined with Mario Freitas' insights and suggestions, has enabled me to make a decision. I'm going with 'capping a dome'.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Mario Freitas: Here goes Julie's BrownieZ for you.
8 hrs
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