Pasy zaporowe

English translation: wildlife food plots

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Polish term or phrase:Pasy zaporowe
English translation:wildlife food plots
Entered by: Frank Szmulowicz, Ph. D.

13:51 Dec 18, 2017
Polish to English translations [PRO]
Forestry / Wood / Timber
Polish term or phrase: Pasy zaporowe
Pasy zaporowe
Tropy zwierząt
Ptaki chronione
Grzyby leśne
Jerry Dean
United States
Local time: 06:43
wildlife food plots
Explanation:
pasy zaporowe
łowieckie poletka żerowe i zgryzowe lokalizowane w lesie na drodze do pól lub upraw leśnych, mające na celu zatrzymanie zwierzyny i uniknięcie wyrządzanych przez nią szkód.
http://slowniklowiecki.pl/definicja/1947,pasy-zaporowe

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Poletko łowieckie – obszary obsiane lub obsadzone roślinami stanowiącymi pokarm dla zwierzyny leśnej[1]. Do dokarmiania stosuje się zwykle rośliny pastewne. Poletka łowieckie mają na celu poprawę dostępności składników pokarmowych dla populacji zwierzyny łownej oraz ograniczenie szkód łowieckich w uprawach rolniczych

https://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poletko_łowieckie

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Po niemiecku Wildacker
Bei einem Wildacker handelt es sich um eine besondere, vom Jäger landwirtschaftlich bearbeitete Fläche, mit dem Zweck, dass auf ihr das Wild Nahrung und Deckung vor Feinden finden kann.

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Wildlife Food Plots or Supplemental Plantings
Planting food supplements or forages can benefit many species including turkey, mourning doves, bobwhite quail and white-tailed deer. Knowing which forage to plant and when to plant is essential when seeking to benefit wildlife in an area.
http://www.naturalresources.msstate.edu/wildlife/food-plots....

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Note added at 29 mins (2017-12-18 14:20:57 GMT)
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Food plot

A food plot is a planted area set aside to act as a supplementary food source for wildlife. The term was coined by the U.S. hunting and outdoor industries.

Food plot crops generally consist of but are not limited to legumes (clovers, alfalfa, beans, etc.), grains, or certain wildflowers. The plants may be annual or perennial. In agricultural areas, food plots may be planted in fields after the crop has been harvested, and left standing through the fall, winter, and early spring for the use of wildlife.[1]

In some cases farmers and landowners may be reimbursed by the government for providing foot plots that meet government specifications.[2] Among other considerations, a food plot should be located close to a source of cover for the animals, and it should be only one part of a comprehensive habitat management program.[3] Ideally a food plot should be small (2 to 4 acres), irregularly shaped, and located away from roads.[4]

Food plots differ from revegetation, which is intended to stabilize and rebuild the soil of disturbed land using naturally growing grasses, legumes, shrubs, and trees. Food plots are intended to feed wildlife rather than rebuild the soil, and generally use agricultural forages rather than native or naturally occurring plants. The oldest company to start developing products for food plots is the Whitetail Institute of North America in 1988. [5]

Food plots can greatly increase the wildlife carrying capacity of a particular ecosystem, enhancing opportunities for hunting or wildlife viewing. Target animals include Whitetail deer, Bear, Moose, Rabbit, Woodchuck, Deer, Wild turkey, Grouse, and songbirds.[1]

In 2001 the United States Fish and Wildlife Service announced that 8.7 million people across the country maintained some sort of planting for the sole benefit of wildlife. This group of people spent $699 million on these plantings.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Food_plot
Selected response from:

Frank Szmulowicz, Ph. D.
United States
Local time: 06:43
Grading comment
thank you
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4wildlife food plots
Frank Szmulowicz, Ph. D.
3buffer strip
Darius Saczuk


  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
buffer strip


Explanation:
P

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Note added at 5 mins (2017-12-18 13:57:01 GMT)
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Buffer strip - Wikipedia
Wikipedia › wiki › Buffer_strip
from en.m.wikipedia.org
A buffer strip is an area of land maintained in permanent vegetation that helps to control air, soil, and water quality, along with other environmental problems, dealing primarily on land ...
Types

Darius Saczuk
United States
Native speaker of: Native in PolishPolish, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 16
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

23 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
wildlife food plots


Explanation:
pasy zaporowe
łowieckie poletka żerowe i zgryzowe lokalizowane w lesie na drodze do pól lub upraw leśnych, mające na celu zatrzymanie zwierzyny i uniknięcie wyrządzanych przez nią szkód.
http://slowniklowiecki.pl/definicja/1947,pasy-zaporowe

ccccccc

Poletko łowieckie – obszary obsiane lub obsadzone roślinami stanowiącymi pokarm dla zwierzyny leśnej[1]. Do dokarmiania stosuje się zwykle rośliny pastewne. Poletka łowieckie mają na celu poprawę dostępności składników pokarmowych dla populacji zwierzyny łownej oraz ograniczenie szkód łowieckich w uprawach rolniczych

https://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poletko_łowieckie

cccc

Po niemiecku Wildacker
Bei einem Wildacker handelt es sich um eine besondere, vom Jäger landwirtschaftlich bearbeitete Fläche, mit dem Zweck, dass auf ihr das Wild Nahrung und Deckung vor Feinden finden kann.

ccccccc
Wildlife Food Plots or Supplemental Plantings
Planting food supplements or forages can benefit many species including turkey, mourning doves, bobwhite quail and white-tailed deer. Knowing which forage to plant and when to plant is essential when seeking to benefit wildlife in an area.
http://www.naturalresources.msstate.edu/wildlife/food-plots....

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 29 mins (2017-12-18 14:20:57 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

ccccccccccccccccccc
Food plot

A food plot is a planted area set aside to act as a supplementary food source for wildlife. The term was coined by the U.S. hunting and outdoor industries.

Food plot crops generally consist of but are not limited to legumes (clovers, alfalfa, beans, etc.), grains, or certain wildflowers. The plants may be annual or perennial. In agricultural areas, food plots may be planted in fields after the crop has been harvested, and left standing through the fall, winter, and early spring for the use of wildlife.[1]

In some cases farmers and landowners may be reimbursed by the government for providing foot plots that meet government specifications.[2] Among other considerations, a food plot should be located close to a source of cover for the animals, and it should be only one part of a comprehensive habitat management program.[3] Ideally a food plot should be small (2 to 4 acres), irregularly shaped, and located away from roads.[4]

Food plots differ from revegetation, which is intended to stabilize and rebuild the soil of disturbed land using naturally growing grasses, legumes, shrubs, and trees. Food plots are intended to feed wildlife rather than rebuild the soil, and generally use agricultural forages rather than native or naturally occurring plants. The oldest company to start developing products for food plots is the Whitetail Institute of North America in 1988. [5]

Food plots can greatly increase the wildlife carrying capacity of a particular ecosystem, enhancing opportunities for hunting or wildlife viewing. Target animals include Whitetail deer, Bear, Moose, Rabbit, Woodchuck, Deer, Wild turkey, Grouse, and songbirds.[1]

In 2001 the United States Fish and Wildlife Service announced that 8.7 million people across the country maintained some sort of planting for the sole benefit of wildlife. This group of people spent $699 million on these plantings.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Food_plot

Frank Szmulowicz, Ph. D.
United States
Local time: 06:43
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PolishPolish
PRO pts in category: 36
Grading comment
thank you
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



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