platetopp

English translation: hob/cooktop

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Norwegian term or phrase:platetopp
English translation:hob/cooktop
Entered by: Charles Ek

21:13 Jun 22, 2015
Norwegian to English translations [PRO]
Cooking / Culinary
Norwegian term or phrase: platetopp
I know what it is. I know what it's called in the UK. I know what it's called over here.

What I don't know if whether anyone has ever been smart enough to hit upon a SINGLE term that is comprehensible on both sides of the pond. There is no way an American will understand what a "hob" is, and my researches indicate the converse is probably usually true for our "cooktop".
Charles Ek
United States
Local time: 20:14
the heat
Explanation:
"On the heat" or a variation of this maybe. e.g.
Put a large saucepan on a medium heat.
Put the haddock in a pan over a medium heat, cover with boiling water, and leave to simmer for a few minutes, until barely cooked. Turn off the heat and let the fish cool in its bath.

Put a casserole on a medium heat and add three-quarters of the butter.
Stir in the peas, adjust the seasoning to taste, and leave on the heat.



Alternatively, couldn't you write cooktop (or hob in the UK) or vice versa and then continue to use one noun after that?

Selected response from:

eodd
Local time: 02:14
Grading comment
I chose the option of showing both. If nothinhg else, the various proposed answers and comments demonstrate the current lack of transatlantic consensus on this. :-)
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +1top of the stove
Charlesp
3 +1the heat
eodd
3burner
Donna Stevens
3cooktop
Per Bergvall
4 -2element
Simon Klys


Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
the heat


Explanation:
"On the heat" or a variation of this maybe. e.g.
Put a large saucepan on a medium heat.
Put the haddock in a pan over a medium heat, cover with boiling water, and leave to simmer for a few minutes, until barely cooked. Turn off the heat and let the fish cool in its bath.

Put a casserole on a medium heat and add three-quarters of the butter.
Stir in the peas, adjust the seasoning to taste, and leave on the heat.



Alternatively, couldn't you write cooktop (or hob in the UK) or vice versa and then continue to use one noun after that?




    Reference: http://food.ndtv.com/food-drinks/the-weekend-cook-thomasina-...
    Reference: http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/heat
eodd
Local time: 02:14
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 3
Grading comment
I chose the option of showing both. If nothinhg else, the various proposed answers and comments demonstrate the current lack of transatlantic consensus on this. :-)
Notes to answerer
Asker: Your suggestion to show both is actually the perfect solution in this instance. It turns out that the term only appears once. Thanks for the "dope slap", as we call it over here.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  tinaparelius: Charles Ek's suggestion of 'stovetop' is far better
3 hrs

agree  Chris S
9 hrs

neutral  Charlesp: yea, "turn up the heat!' But that isn't a noun.
15 hrs
  -> Yes, heat is a noun. http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/heat

agree  Donna Stevens: Most recipes just mention heat, not placement of the pan. Such as " Heat basil and olive oil in a large frying pan over medium-high heat." or Put the pot back on a low heat for an extra minute" However, cooktop is NOT a hob.
1 day 16 hrs
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8 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
cooktop


Explanation:
Our British friends in Spain routinely use cooktop when discussing culinary action - perhaps just because hob isn't likely to be understood.

Per Bergvall
Norway
Local time: 03:14
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in NorwegianNorwegian
PRO pts in category: 8
Notes to answerer
Asker: Donna, as a certain movie character might have said, "Lot and lots of them" at http://tinyurl.com/nmgaczp. ;-)


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Chris S: I've never heard it used.
2 hrs

agree  Charlesp: I'd go with that! "cooktop" sounds right. Everyone would understand that. //Donna says that it doesn't exist in recipe books - but however it does exist in dictionaries.
8 hrs

disagree  Donna Stevens: I've never seen this in a recipe book in the US or in the UK. Most recipes make no mention of where the pan is placed . They state something like "Melt half the butter in a non-stick pan. Cook the onion for 3-4 mins, then increase the heat."
11 hrs
  -> So maybe none of Charles' 25k hits came from recipe books. Makes me curious - what do the books say instead?
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17 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -2
element


Explanation:
'Element' is a more generic term used for both cookers and hobs.

eg. place the pan on the heating element

Simon Klys
Germany
Local time: 03:14
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Charlesp: I agree that element is a term used here, but it is technical term and a vague one. So as a consumer term, I wouldn't use that.
19 mins

disagree  Donna Stevens: heating element sounds like some kind of heater, not a stove (hob)
3 hrs
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13 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
burner


Explanation:
This term is used on both sides of the Atlantic.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 19 hrs (2015-06-23 17:08:01 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

On Amazon.co.uk, they sell something to cover this part of the hob. The item is called a "burner cover", which is used to cover both electric and gas burners in the kitchen. See http://www.amazon.co.uk/First4Spares-Burner-Cover-Large-Brit...


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 19 hrs (2015-06-23 17:12:58 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Also, many recipes refer to cooking on a burner, even though it is an electric stove: http://www.thekitchn.com/the-2burner-trick-how-to-cook-14251...



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 20 hrs (2015-06-23 17:21:00 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Many recipes refer to the use of a heated burner, such as " Cut the carrots in circles again. Place them on the grid for steam cooking on a heated burner for around 4 minutes." This term is used in the UK as well as in the US. http://blog.fantasticovencleaners.co.uk/how-to-best-cook-the...


Example sentence(s):
  • Place the pan onto a burner. Turn the burner to medium.
Donna Stevens
Norway
Local time: 03:14
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Notes to answerer
Asker: Sorry, but the matter involves flat cooking surfaces, either an induction or conventional electrical appliance.

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17 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
top of the stove


Explanation:
How about "the top of the stove" - as in:

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 21 hrs (2015-06-23 18:51:33 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I stand corrected: "top of the kitchen stove"

(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kitchen_stove)

Sort of.

See also:
the stoves sold at Currys: http://tinyurl.com/q2pwma9/

And what does the company called "Stoves: manufacture?
http://www.stoves.co.uk/


Example sentence(s):
  • Heat it up on the top of the stove.
Charlesp
Sweden
Local time: 03:14
Native speaker of: English

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Michele Fauble: 'stovetop'
3 hrs
  -> Hej thanks Michele!

agree  Per Bergvall: I like 'top of the stove', even though my stovetop has been disconnected from the actual stove (which I like to keep at working rather than ankle height) ever since that feature became an option.
3 hrs
  -> That's because you are special!

disagree  Donna Stevens: not if you want it to be good on both sides of the Atlantic. This is a stove in the UK http://www.ukstoves.co.uk/
3 hrs
  -> Huh? And which side wouldn't have a clue?
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