imperio imperio inferna fortuna crudelitas

English translation: incorrect Latin

03:59 Jan 19, 2006
Latin to English translations [Non-PRO]
Science (general)
Latin term or phrase: imperio imperio inferna fortuna crudelitas
It is a lyric from a gregorian chant featured in a song called 'Das Omen' by a band called 'E Nomine'
Mike
English translation:incorrect Latin
Explanation:
Sorry Mike, this is not correct Latin, just a bounch of words.

Imperio: "With the power" (ablative for imperium)
Inferna: Hell (accusative plural)
Fortuna: Luck
Crudelitas: Cruelty.

All of these are nouns, but there is no sense in the sentence.

Flavio
Selected response from:

Flavio Ferri-Benedetti
Switzerland
Local time: 00:37
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.



Summary of answers provided
5 +5incorrect Latin
Flavio Ferri-Benedetti
4 -1Infernal powers, favour cruelty
Robert Tucker (X)


  

Answers


6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
Infernal powers, favour cruelty


Explanation:
An evocation or incitement for hell to favour cruelty.

Possibly one is expected to make reference to "Fortune favours the brave" and form and consider “Hell favours the cruel.

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Note added at 2006-01-19 18:57:47 (GMT)
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From Glossator (http://www.geocities.com/mfp_99/glossator.html), based on Whitaker\'s Words, I have:

imperi.o:

noun (thing) dative neuter singular
noun (thing) ablative neuter singular

command; authority; rule, supreme power; the state, the empire


infern.a:

adjective positive nominative singular
adjective positive ablative singular
adjective positive vocative singular
adjective positive nominative plural
adjective positive accusative plural
adjective positive vocative plural

lower, under; underground, of the lower regions, infernal; of hell;

infern.a

noun (thing) nominative neuter plural
noun (thing) vocative neuter plural
noun (thing) accusative neuter plural

the lower regions (pl.), infernal regions, hell;

fortun.a

noun (thing) nominative feminine singular
noun (thing) vocative feminine singular
noun (thing) ablative feminine singular

chance, luck, fate; prosperity; condition, wealth, property;

fortun.a

verb (transitive) imperative active present 2nd person singular

to make happy, bless, prosper; (Cassell\'s Latin Dictionary 1968)

crudelitas

noun (thing) nominative feminine singular
noun (thing) vocative feminine singular

cruelty, barbarity, inhumanity

I therefore submit that “imperio inferna” (noun + adjective) is ablative, “fortuna” (verb) is imperative, and “crudelitas” (noun) vocative.

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Note added at 2006-01-19 19:21:06 (GMT)
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Unless cruelty is to make hell happy - might that make more sense grammatically?

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Note added at 2006-01-20 00:04:22 (GMT)
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Or hell is the place where or by which cruelty is to make happy?

Robert Tucker (X)
United Kingdom
Local time: 23:37
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Flavio Ferri-Benedetti: I am sorry, Robert, but I cannot find the reasons for your translation: "Inferna" is not an adjective here, and there is no verb either (favour?). The Latin sentence does not make sense, really.
5 hrs
  -> I've added information I got from "Glossator". Admittedly I'm not 100% sure of the grammar.
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11 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +5
incorrect Latin


Explanation:
Sorry Mike, this is not correct Latin, just a bounch of words.

Imperio: "With the power" (ablative for imperium)
Inferna: Hell (accusative plural)
Fortuna: Luck
Crudelitas: Cruelty.

All of these are nouns, but there is no sense in the sentence.

Flavio

Flavio Ferri-Benedetti
Switzerland
Local time: 00:37
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian, Native in SpanishSpanish
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Cristina Chaplin
6 hrs

agree  Leonardo Marcello Pignataro (X): Absolutely! They are just a bunch of words and having a look at the other Latin "sentences" in the rest of the song, it's just the same
7 hrs

agree  Alfa Trans (X)
1 day 3 hrs

agree  Cristina Moldovan do Amaral
3 days 15 hrs

agree  alcaeus
15 days
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