Quod me non destruit me confirmat

English translation: Vide infra

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Latin term or phrase:Quod me non destruit me confirmat
English translation:Vide infra
Entered by: alcaeus

07:26 May 2, 2008
Latin to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary - Philosophy
Latin term or phrase: Quod me non destruit me confirmat
I understand that the phrase 'Quod me non destruit me confirmat' roughly means 'that which does not destroy me makes me strong', however I want to ask whether or not the two 'me' in the phrase are completely necessary in the phrase and in their respective spots or if they can be changed, moved, or altered in any other way.
Andy
Vide infra
Explanation:
The second 'me' may be omitted, since the context makes readily clear who the direct object is, and this is in fact the commoner construction in classical prose.

But by changing the order of the negative 'non' or of the verbs, one would alter the sense radically. For instance, 'quod me non confirmat (me) destruit' would mean the opposite--'What does not make me strong destroys me'., while 'quod me destruit (me) non confirmat' would mean 'What destroys me does not make me stronger'.
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alcaeus
United States
Local time: 01:07
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Summary of answers provided
5 +1Vide infra
alcaeus


  

Answers


3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Vide infra


Explanation:
The second 'me' may be omitted, since the context makes readily clear who the direct object is, and this is in fact the commoner construction in classical prose.

But by changing the order of the negative 'non' or of the verbs, one would alter the sense radically. For instance, 'quod me non confirmat (me) destruit' would mean the opposite--'What does not make me strong destroys me'., while 'quod me destruit (me) non confirmat' would mean 'What destroys me does not make me stronger'.

alcaeus
United States
Local time: 01:07
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 3
Grading comment
Thanks

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jim Tucker (X): Going the extra milia passuum as usual, I see; greetings Joseph.
1 hr
  -> Benigne dicis, disertissime.
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