non plus ultra

English translation: nothing beyond it / no more beyond

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Latin term or phrase:non plus ultra
English translation:nothing beyond it / no more beyond
Entered by: Sheila Hardie

01:23 Dec 31, 2001
Latin to English translations [Non-PRO]
Philosophy / philosophy
Latin term or phrase: non plus ultra
it is a simple Latin phrase
Michael Sheller
nothing beyond it / no more beyond
Explanation:
I agree with the two answers above. I just wanted to give you a few references, which talk about the supposed origin of this phrase.

HTH

Sheila

NON PLUS ULTRA
Non Plus Ultra (not further on), according to the tradition, was the sentence written on the so-called Pillars of Hercules ( the Pillars placed by Hercules in the present Straits of Gibraltar) to show that was humanly impossible to cross them warning all the sailors to abandon the impius undertaking.
Later, Plus Ultra become one Carlo V's motto to proudly remember how large his kingdom was, even exceeding the traditional heart' s limits.
Nowadays Non Plus Ultra usually means the top level people can in a given field.
When we decided to realize this "Internet site", we felt Non Plus Ultra to be the best name showing our philosophy: TO OFFER THE BEST.

http://www.nonplusultra.com/infoe.htm


Some centuries later, Romans too, faithful to old traditions, called the Strait of Gibraltar <<Froetum Herculeum Gaditanum>>, and still considered the Pillars of Hercules to be the limit of the world, the <<Non Plus Ultra> or <<No Farther Away>> point.
 

THE SPANISH DOLLAR
Through the ages, Phoenicians and Greeks, Celts and Romans, Vikings and Portuguese, all had sailed beyond the Strait of Gibraltar up and down the Atlantic shores, but this was mostly coastline navigation.

It wasn't until Columbus' discovery of the Americas, in 1492, that seafaring technology proved to be ripe enough for sailors to venture "safely" into the open ocean.

The Italian navigator's feat shattered the ancient legend behind the Pillars of Hercules. From that time on, to leave mark of Columbus' heroic deed, and of the existence of Spanish territories beyond the Atlantic, Spain revised the old Latin motto <<Non Plus Ultra>>, and turned it into <<Plus Ultra>>, <<Farther Away>>. Thus, the two Pillars of Hercules with this revised inscription were embodied into the new Spanish coat of arms, of which they became a prominent and distinctive feature.

http://www2.alcala.es/asi/amcana/DOLLAR.HTM


"The story that it tells is of Spanish entrepreneurs venturing out into an unknown ocean because it was felt (due to Columbus’ early voyages) that there was “more beyond” (PLUS ULTRA). It brazenly displays the “two worlds”, the old and the new, capped by one Spanish Crown and riding on waves emanating from between the Pillars of Hercules (Straits of Gibraltar). This is a declaration that Spain claimed dominion over both worlds..."
In mythology, Hercules reached the limits of the Mediterranean and raised two great columns upon which he inscribed Non Plus Ultra - as this was the supposed border of the known world. The Pillars of Hercules now refers to the twin mountains of Gibraltar and Mt. Acho. Below is an illustration of the old Spanish "Pillar Dollar" bearing the Twin Columns of Hercules & Twin Globes of the Old & New World. [back to the 7-11 Gibraltar Connection]

http://www.mt.net/~watcher/dollarsign.html



Non plus ultra! Nothing above that!

http://www.geocities.com/latingreeksite/phrases/proverbs.htm
Selected response from:

Sheila Hardie
Spain
Local time: 20:01
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +2nothing beyond it / no more beyond
Sheila Hardie
5 +1Unsurpassable
Monica Colangelo
4no more beyond
Parrot


  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
no more beyond


Explanation:
This is the literal meaning. The motto is political, however, and would depend on the contect in which you need it translated (coat of arms, etc.)

Parrot
Spain
Local time: 20:01
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Eva Blanar: I am not sure this is political (in Hungary, we have a cake, for instance, under this name). It shall come from Pindaros, but was used all over the centuries with different "contents".
2 days 17 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Unsurpassable


Explanation:
that´s it!

Monica Colangelo
Argentina
Local time: 15:01
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Eva Blanar: This is the correct translation, or you might leave it in Latin.
2 days 16 hrs
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7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
nothing beyond it / no more beyond


Explanation:
I agree with the two answers above. I just wanted to give you a few references, which talk about the supposed origin of this phrase.

HTH

Sheila

NON PLUS ULTRA
Non Plus Ultra (not further on), according to the tradition, was the sentence written on the so-called Pillars of Hercules ( the Pillars placed by Hercules in the present Straits of Gibraltar) to show that was humanly impossible to cross them warning all the sailors to abandon the impius undertaking.
Later, Plus Ultra become one Carlo V's motto to proudly remember how large his kingdom was, even exceeding the traditional heart' s limits.
Nowadays Non Plus Ultra usually means the top level people can in a given field.
When we decided to realize this "Internet site", we felt Non Plus Ultra to be the best name showing our philosophy: TO OFFER THE BEST.

http://www.nonplusultra.com/infoe.htm


Some centuries later, Romans too, faithful to old traditions, called the Strait of Gibraltar <<Froetum Herculeum Gaditanum>>, and still considered the Pillars of Hercules to be the limit of the world, the <<Non Plus Ultra> or <<No Farther Away>> point.
 

THE SPANISH DOLLAR
Through the ages, Phoenicians and Greeks, Celts and Romans, Vikings and Portuguese, all had sailed beyond the Strait of Gibraltar up and down the Atlantic shores, but this was mostly coastline navigation.

It wasn't until Columbus' discovery of the Americas, in 1492, that seafaring technology proved to be ripe enough for sailors to venture "safely" into the open ocean.

The Italian navigator's feat shattered the ancient legend behind the Pillars of Hercules. From that time on, to leave mark of Columbus' heroic deed, and of the existence of Spanish territories beyond the Atlantic, Spain revised the old Latin motto <<Non Plus Ultra>>, and turned it into <<Plus Ultra>>, <<Farther Away>>. Thus, the two Pillars of Hercules with this revised inscription were embodied into the new Spanish coat of arms, of which they became a prominent and distinctive feature.

http://www2.alcala.es/asi/amcana/DOLLAR.HTM


"The story that it tells is of Spanish entrepreneurs venturing out into an unknown ocean because it was felt (due to Columbus’ early voyages) that there was “more beyond” (PLUS ULTRA). It brazenly displays the “two worlds”, the old and the new, capped by one Spanish Crown and riding on waves emanating from between the Pillars of Hercules (Straits of Gibraltar). This is a declaration that Spain claimed dominion over both worlds..."
In mythology, Hercules reached the limits of the Mediterranean and raised two great columns upon which he inscribed Non Plus Ultra - as this was the supposed border of the known world. The Pillars of Hercules now refers to the twin mountains of Gibraltar and Mt. Acho. Below is an illustration of the old Spanish "Pillar Dollar" bearing the Twin Columns of Hercules & Twin Globes of the Old & New World. [back to the 7-11 Gibraltar Connection]

http://www.mt.net/~watcher/dollarsign.html



Non plus ultra! Nothing above that!

http://www.geocities.com/latingreeksite/phrases/proverbs.htm

Sheila Hardie
Spain
Local time: 20:01
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Henri (X)
3 hrs
  -> thanks, Henri:)

agree  Eva Blanar: This is really very informative, thanks. By the way, strangely enough, this expression might be translated also as "top performance", but as an adjective as well.
2 days 10 hrs
  -> thanks, Eva:)
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