https://wiki.proz.com/kudoz/italian-to-english/medical-general/5385212-promotore.html

promotore

English translation: sponsor

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Italian term or phrase:promotore
English translation:sponsor
Entered by: Daniel Gold

21:44 Nov 11, 2013
Italian to English translations [PRO]
Science - Medical (general) / research
Italian term or phrase: promotore
This is from a research project in the health care field.

In the title, a number of individuals are listed after the word "PROMOTORI:"

Could you assume that the term is equivalent to "AUTORI:"? If such is not the case, is there another term that fills the bill?

Thanks.
Daniel Gold
Israel
Local time: 17:03
sponsor
Explanation:
usually in this context

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Note added at 15 hrs (2013-11-12 13:02:21 GMT)
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Lifespan and Rhode Island Hospital sponsor many clinical trials that
http://www.rhodeislandhospital.org/about-us/research-spotlig...

A sponsor is an organisation which takes responsibility for the quality and conduct of a research project. All research conducted within the NHS is required to have a research sponsor.

The sponsor can be defined in two ways:

The Research Governance Framework describes a sponsor as an 'individual, organisation or group taking on responsibility for securing the arrangements to initiate, manage and finance a study'.
The Clinical Trials Regulations describes a sponsor, in relation to a clinical trial, as the person who takes responsibility for the initiation, management and financing (or arranging the financing) of that trial.

http://www.uhbristol.nhs.uk/research-innovation/information-...

Hospital-Initiated Clinical Trials

http://www.willis.com/Documents/Publications/Life_Sciences/L...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 15 hrs (2013-11-12 13:04:38 GMT)
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Sponsor of a clinical trial

Regulation 3: This defines Sponsor of a clinical trial as the person/organisation who takes responsibility for the initiation, management and financing (or arranging financing) of that trial. If two or more persons take responsibility for carrying out functions, they will have joint responsibility or they may allocate different responsibilities amongst themselves. E.g. roles include obtaining authorisation, conduct of clinical trials and pharmacovigilance.
http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/racdv/resgov/clintrials/clinicalreg...
Selected response from:

Rachel Fell
United Kingdom
Local time: 15:03
Grading comment
Grazie
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +3sponsor
Rachel Fell
5 +1promoter
Tom in London
Summary of reference entries provided
promotori
Federica Borgini

  

Answers


37 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
promoter


Explanation:
obvious - no?

Tom in London
United Kingdom
Local time: 15:03
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 120

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  texjax DDS PhD: It's not that obvious, Tom.
2 hrs

agree  Federica Borgini: I must agree with this solution. The two terms do not coincide although they are often used interchangeably. Many clinical trials are not financed by pharmaceutical companies but by hospitals, univ., the Min. of Health. These are "promoters"
9 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
sponsor


Explanation:
usually in this context

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 15 hrs (2013-11-12 13:02:21 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Lifespan and Rhode Island Hospital sponsor many clinical trials that
http://www.rhodeislandhospital.org/about-us/research-spotlig...

A sponsor is an organisation which takes responsibility for the quality and conduct of a research project. All research conducted within the NHS is required to have a research sponsor.

The sponsor can be defined in two ways:

The Research Governance Framework describes a sponsor as an 'individual, organisation or group taking on responsibility for securing the arrangements to initiate, manage and finance a study'.
The Clinical Trials Regulations describes a sponsor, in relation to a clinical trial, as the person who takes responsibility for the initiation, management and financing (or arranging the financing) of that trial.

http://www.uhbristol.nhs.uk/research-innovation/information-...

Hospital-Initiated Clinical Trials

http://www.willis.com/Documents/Publications/Life_Sciences/L...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 15 hrs (2013-11-12 13:04:38 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Sponsor of a clinical trial

Regulation 3: This defines Sponsor of a clinical trial as the person/organisation who takes responsibility for the initiation, management and financing (or arranging financing) of that trial. If two or more persons take responsibility for carrying out functions, they will have joint responsibility or they may allocate different responsibilities amongst themselves. E.g. roles include obtaining authorisation, conduct of clinical trials and pharmacovigilance.
http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/racdv/resgov/clintrials/clinicalreg...

Rachel Fell
United Kingdom
Local time: 15:03
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 337
Grading comment
Grazie
Notes to answerer
Asker: I also considered "sponsor", which came up on IATE, but didn't give it much weight because the promotori are individuals and not companies, as Phil pointed out. I'm leaning toward "authors" in this context and am considering promotori to be jargon that has been loosely applied here.

Asker: And here's yet another rub: the "sponsor" referred to here does not seem to be a company or financial backer at all, but the "mentor" of trainees doing the research ("sponsored" by an AUSL and a Universita' degli studi). That makes more sense. See http://my.americanheart.org/professional/Research/FundingOpportunities/SupportingInformation/SponsorMentor-Information-Page_UCM_320667_Article.jsp


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  philgoddard: Although I would expect it to be companies, not individuals.
1 hr
  -> Yes, so would I - thank you Phil :-)

agree  texjax DDS PhD: Dovrebbe essere così (anche se ho un minimo dubbio qui). Sponsor: promotore della ricerca (dà inizio, gestisce e/o finanzia) http://xfiles.farmacia.uniba.it/farmol/didattica_web/32/argo...
1 hr
  -> Thank you - ciao! :-)

neutral  James (Jim) Davis: I too would expect it to be companies and have too much down to agree. A promotore can also often be an organiser of an event. "incontro promosso da"
11 hrs

agree  Lydia Cleary: yes, in clinical trials they are always called sponsors.
11 hrs
  -> Thank you lydders:-)
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Reference comments


10 hrs
Reference: promotori

Reference information:
qualche anno fa sono stata a un Corso ECM "Tra scienza ed etica: il ruolo dei comitati etici nell'Unione Europea" e parlavano proprio di "promotori"/promoter relativamente a quegli studi clinici (ad esempio sulle malattie rare) che, non avendo una casistica molto importante non interessano granché all'industria farmaceutica e quindi vengono promossi da altre realtà (ospedali, università, ecc.). In questo caso sarebbe improprio parlare di sponsor.


    Reference: http://xoomer.virgilio.it/pgiuff/osservatorio.htm
Federica Borgini
Italy
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Italian
PRO pts in category: 36
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