antipasti misti di mare e terra

English translation: surf and turf appetisers (or appetizers)

11:30 Jul 23, 2012
Italian to English translations [PRO]
Cooking / Culinary / Menu ristorante
Italian term or phrase: antipasti misti di mare e terra
Si tratta del menu di un ristorante
Global Logos di Crucitti Daniele
Italy
Local time: 11:55
English translation:surf and turf appetisers (or appetizers)
Explanation:
The fashionable term nowadays. May not be to everyone's taste from a language point of view, but it's just a suggestion. If it's specifically an Italian menu I'd keep antipasti in Italian
Selected response from:

Judith McLean
United Kingdom
Local time: 10:55
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +6surf and turf appetisers (or appetizers)
Judith McLean
5 +4antipasti misti di mare e terra
Tom in London
4 +1surf-and-turf antipasti
Simon Lewis
4<*: mixed sea-food – earth-food starter/appetiser; *>: sea & earth hors d'oeuvre melange
Michael Korovkin


Discussion entries: 5





  

Answers


11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +6
surf and turf appetisers (or appetizers)


Explanation:
The fashionable term nowadays. May not be to everyone's taste from a language point of view, but it's just a suggestion. If it's specifically an Italian menu I'd keep antipasti in Italian


    Reference: http://www.lhj.com/recipes/easy/appetizers/surf-and-turf-app...
Judith McLean
United Kingdom
Local time: 10:55
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 44
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Simon Lewis: BEat me! Suggest antipasti left as-is
3 mins

neutral  Tom in London: "surf and turf" sounds horrible but good enough, if the translation is for am American market. It totally fails to capture the finesse I would expect to see and taste, if eating this dish
23 mins
  -> I agree it completely depends on the context. No idea what type of establishment it is, but a lot of top UK chefs use this term so I wouldn't say it's just American.

agree  Pernigotti Translations: agree
2 hrs

neutral  philgoddard: I agree with Tom.
2 hrs

agree  Colin Rowe: While I prefer the idea of leaving the Italian unmolested, depending on the "level of the joint" as Michael Korovkin puts it, this is certainly a valid option for a less "posh" eatery (see Discussion).
3 hrs

agree  Yvonne Gallagher: surf and turf antipasti very common in all levels of eatery. TV programme here at moment with that title and 2 top chefs!http://www.rte.ie/tv/surfnturf/
9 hrs

agree  Shera Lyn Parpia
22 hrs

agree  Susy Sinigag (X)
3 days 2 hrs
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13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
surf-and-turf antipasti


Explanation:
Surf-and-turf is quite common when talking about mixed seafood/meat dishes, antipasti is commonly used in English as-is for an Italian hors d'oeuvre (appetizer)

Simon Lewis
United Kingdom
Local time: 10:55
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Yvonne Gallagher: yes, absolutely agree
9 hrs
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37 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +4
antipasti misti di mare e terra


Explanation:
That's right: exactly as it is in the Italian. Most gastronomes would prefer it, and the average, moderately sophisticated diner with even a superficial understanding of Italian would appreciate it a great deal more than the truly horrible "surf and turf" which would make be absolutely NOT want to eat it, or even to see it !

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Note added at 37 mins (2012-07-23 12:07:41 GMT)
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typo :

make be = make me

Tom in London
United Kingdom
Local time: 10:55
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 52

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  philgoddard: Hope your cold gets better soon.
2 hrs
  -> I haven't got a cold, Phil. ???

agree  Colin Rowe: Depending on the nature of the restaurant, this certainly sounds a little more "up-market"
2 hrs

agree  Yvonne Gallagher: yes, if it's up-market
9 hrs

agree  Juliet Halewood
19 hrs
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11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
<*: mixed sea-food – earth-food starter/appetiser; *>: sea & earth hors d'oeuvre melange


Explanation:
... depends on the level of the joint :)

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Note added at 3 hrs (2012-07-23 15:19:28 GMT)
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In somma, all depends on whether or not you want to translate it at all.
Today's pseudo-sophistication in all Anglo-Saxon areas of the world, transliterates lots of Italian. Recently, I heard "I've just returned from Roma"... not to speak about "zabaglione" and "bologna sausage" – with both g's pronounced.

Michael Korovkin
Italy
Local time: 11:55
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in category: 22
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