auf die Schnauze gekocht

English translation: cooked to a tee

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:auf die Schnauze gekocht
English translation:cooked to a tee
Entered by: David Hollywood

00:48 Dec 8, 2017
German to English translations [PRO]
Marketing - Cooking / Culinary / Gastronomy
German term or phrase: auf die Schnauze gekocht
This is part of a sentence referring to the cooking of Spätzle. The full sentence is "klarer Geschmack und auf die Schnauze gekocht."
Michelle Mallasch
cooked to a tee
Explanation:
I would say

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 47 mins (2017-12-08 01:36:07 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

to a tee or to a T

People use to a tee or to a T to mean that something is perfectly or exactly right.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 48 mins (2017-12-08 01:37:30 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

as in the English expression "on the nose" to mean dead right

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 49 mins (2017-12-08 01:37:52 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

perfect

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 50 mins (2017-12-08 01:38:52 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

and in culinary terms "to a tee/T" is just that

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2017-12-08 01:55:22 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

if you don't like "cooked", you could go with "prepared"
Selected response from:

David Hollywood
Local time: 18:48
Grading comment
Thank you! Based on your answer, I used the wording "cooked to perfection."
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +1cooked to a tee
David Hollywood
2Cooking and winging it
Michael Martin, MA


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


41 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
Cooking and winging it


Explanation:
This solution only works if this really means "frei Schnauze kochen." Hence, the low confidence level. I've never heard of "auf die Schnauze kochen." Perhaps another way of saying "mundgerecht zubereiten?"

So we need more context and German native speakers to weigh in on this one...

Michael Martin, MA
United States
Local time: 16:48
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thank you for your response. The expression doesn't seem to be typical. The known expression is "frei Schnauze kochen," however, it isn't being used in the sense of winging it in this case. I went with "cooked to perfection."

Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

45 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
cooked to a tee


Explanation:
I would say

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 47 mins (2017-12-08 01:36:07 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

to a tee or to a T

People use to a tee or to a T to mean that something is perfectly or exactly right.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 48 mins (2017-12-08 01:37:30 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

as in the English expression "on the nose" to mean dead right

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 49 mins (2017-12-08 01:37:52 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

perfect

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 50 mins (2017-12-08 01:38:52 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

and in culinary terms "to a tee/T" is just that

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2017-12-08 01:55:22 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

if you don't like "cooked", you could go with "prepared"

David Hollywood
Local time: 18:48
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 44
Grading comment
Thank you! Based on your answer, I used the wording "cooked to perfection."

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Irene3: 'cooked to perfection'. I agree with Brigitte. This wasn't written by a German native speaker.
11 hrs
  -> thanks Irene
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs (or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.

KudoZ™ translation help

The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.


See also:

Your current localization setting

English

Select a language

Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search