taquet de garde

English translation: midships cleat / spring line cleat

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:taquet de garde
English translation:midships cleat / spring line cleat
Entered by: Tony M

11:02 Sep 28, 2012
French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Ships, Sailing, Maritime / Yacht deck fitting
French term or phrase: taquet de garde
I asked this question once before, way back in 2004, but no suitable answer was forthcoming at that time, so I hope I'll be forgiven for re-posting the same question again, this time with a little more context to work from.

This is a kind of cleat, and seems to be the same size/shape/style as the fore and aft mooring cleats — only it is located amidships, as far as I can see, at the widest point of the vessel's beam.

It is mentioned in connection with mooring alongside other craft, and I wondered if perhaps it is also intended for use with a 'spring'? These yachts, BTW, are all sizes from about 30' to 60' (or possibly above).

One translator (for the Jeanneau range of yachts) has translated it as a 'covering cleat'; however, I'm not entirely convinced by this — could there be confusion with someone who is 'de garde' being on 'cover duty'?? It also has to be said that there are very many other mistakes in this translator's work :-(

This photo shows one clearly — just aft of the end of the bow pulpit, with a fender and also a mooring line running aft made fast to it:

http://www.mottemarine.fr/images/pic_bateaux/b764_07.JPG

(This isn't the boat I'm dealing with, BTW!)
Tony M
France
Local time: 06:02
midship mooring cleat
Explanation:
lots of hits for this, e.g.

http://www.eym.fr/cariboost_files/inventaire_20gamme_20_20ca...

Selected response from:

Mark Nathan
France
Local time: 06:02
Grading comment
Thanks a lot, Mark (and agreers)!

I went with 'midships cleat', since it was paired with 'mooring cleat', and hence the purpose was obvious enough.
I think 'midship' is probably better as the adjective, I tend to see 'amidships' more as a preposition; but it's 35 years since I lived on a boat, so I'm a bit rusty ;-)
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3 +3midship mooring cleat
Mark Nathan
5spring line cleat
Mary Holihan
5cleat for the breast line/rope
Graham macLachlan
4Amidships mooring cleat
Salih1946
3mooring cleat
kashew
Summary of reference entries provided
A good range:
kashew
distinguishing "garde" and "traversier"
Nikki Scott-Despaigne

Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


33 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
mooring cleat


Explanation:
Maybe "bitt"

kashew
France
Local time: 06:02
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 66
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks, J! Sadly, I also had 'mooring cleats', so as a specific distinction was being made here, I couldn't really use this solution.

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56 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
midship mooring cleat


Explanation:
lots of hits for this, e.g.

http://www.eym.fr/cariboost_files/inventaire_20gamme_20_20ca...



Mark Nathan
France
Local time: 06:02
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thanks a lot, Mark (and agreers)!

I went with 'midships cleat', since it was paired with 'mooring cleat', and hence the purpose was obvious enough.
I think 'midship' is probably better as the adjective, I tend to see 'amidships' more as a preposition; but it's 35 years since I lived on a boat, so I'm a bit rusty ;-)

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Alison Sparks (X): given the picture this seems the most sensible description to me, unless you want to call it a fender cleat?
2 hrs
  -> yes, I can see that could be another possibility

agree  Nikki Scott-Despaigne: http://www.kb-boatpark.co.uk/Safe_Mooring
7 hrs
  -> oh good, confirmation from someone with real nautical expertise.

agree  Dr Lofthouse
3 days 4 hrs
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20 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Amidships mooring cleat


Explanation:
Imho

http://www.firstsail.co.uk/parts_of_the_boat.html

Salih1946
United States
Local time: 00:02
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in TurkishTurkish
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thank you, Salih, for your kind contribution! I decided in the end to go for the version using 'midships', as being slightly more common, and certainly more in line with my childhood memories of nautical language while living on a boat!

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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
cleat for the breast line/rope


Explanation:
"de garde" for "pointe de garde" or "breast line/rope"

it's a mooring line which is perpendicular to the fore and aft line of the boat, as opposed to the bow/stern lines and springs which are at 45°

you could call it a "breast line "cleat"

this explains the idea:

How to Tie Down Boats to Secure Them in Heavy Weather | eHow.com
www.ehow.com › Recreational Activities
The breast line, amidships, keeps the boat near the pier to which it is... ... Cleat, with a line secured by a figure-eight wrap ... How to Tie a Rope to a Boat Cleat ...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 23 hrs (2012-09-29 10:53:06 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Yes, Nikki's quite right, I was talking out of my a**

in my defence, I can only plead temporary insanity due to being in a rather boring meeting when I answered :)

the line in the picture is quite definitely a "spring", which no one seems to have mentioned

that said, there is no reason why the cleat in question could not be used for a breast line

so "mooring cleat" covers both possible uses

and "(a)midship(s)" does indicate its positon on the boat

Graham macLachlan
Local time: 06:02
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 352
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks a lot, Graham! I really appreciate your expert opinion — as well as your honesty! As it turns out, this solution would probably have been unnecessarily detailed, and a bit long-winded, for my document.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Nikki Scott-Despaigne: For me, the lines perpendicular to the fore and aft line are as you say, but that in French "traversier" is the term I would expect. To me, the "gardes" are the gardes montante/descendante the bow and stern lines/springs: see my ref post and comment.
7 hrs
  -> you're quite right, I should have looked at the picture, which shows a spring, just goes to show one must always check before posting
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1 day 2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
spring line cleat


Explanation:
Spring line = garde descendante/montante

http://icdept.cgaux.org/pdf_files/English-French-Glossary-Na...

This is the cleat intended for the spring line. It is also a mid ship cleat, because that is where it is, but this is a more specific definition.

Mary Holihan
United States
Local time: 00:02
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Notes to answerer
Asker: Oh, thanks a lot, Mary! Sorry, I only just saw your answer, don't know why I didn't spot the notification come in before :-( Anyway, I appreciate your kind contribution, which I feel sure is techncially accurate. For my particular document, the significance was however more in the <i>position</i> of this cleat rather than its <i>function</i>, so I'm happy enough that the term chosen was the best translation solution in this particular instance.

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Reference comments


32 mins
Reference: A good range:

Reference information:
http://www.jamestowndistributors.com/userportal/search_subCa...

kashew
France
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 66
Note to reference poster
Asker: Thanks, J, very helpful... and now bookmarked!

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8 hrs
Reference: distinguishing "garde" and "traversier"

Reference information:
http://fr.wikibooks.org/wiki/Cours_de_voile/Glossaire

Appareiller : . On différencie les gardes et les pointes.

Gardes : des cordage mis en place pour empêcher que le bateau avance (garde montante) ou recule (garde descendante).


http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amarrage_(maritime)

Numéro Nom Rôle
Aussière 1 Pointe avant Empêche de culer
Aussière 2 Traversier avant Empêche de s'écarter
Aussière 3 Garde montante avant Empêche d'avancer
Aussière 4 Garde montante arrière Empêche de culer
Aussière 5 Traversier arrière Empêche de s'écarter
Aussière 6 Pointe arrière Empêche d'avancer

Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 190
Note to reference poster
Asker: Thanks, Nikki, really helpful explanations — so 'garde' is 'spring', my nautical terminology is rusty, what do we call the others in EN?

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