bandeau de défense

English translation: fender strip

15:17 Oct 5, 2011
French to English translations [PRO]
Ships, Sailing, Maritime / boat parts
French term or phrase: bandeau de défense
Les bandeaux de 4’’ en caoutchouc sont déchirés, le pavoie est légèrement endommagé, les bolts qui retiennent les bandeaux de défenses avec la coque sont cassées et/ou arrachées de leurs emprises.

Talking about the parts damaged on the boat:

- Les bandeaux de défenses bâbord & tribord
- Bolts qui retiennent les bandeaux de défenses à la coque sont cassées
- Bris au fibre de verre là où passe les bolts qui retiennent le bandeau de défense après la coque.

The French in the document is often wrong and intermingled with terms in English, as you can see. I understand what this part of the boat is, but don't know the correct term in English.
Laura Molinari
Canada
Local time: 09:55
English translation:fender strip
Explanation:
On boats most kinds of protection of the hull are call fenders of one kind another. This would be likely to be a fender strip.

http://www.smartmarine.co.nz/white-dinghy-fender-strip-piece...
Selected response from:

Gilla Evans
Local time: 14:55
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +4rubbing strake
Graham macLachlan
4 +2fender strip
Gilla Evans
3bumper
Alex Lane


  

Answers


19 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
bumper


Explanation:
Was not able to find the term per se, but a 4-inch rubber strip along the port and starboard sides of a hull sure sounds like a bumper. (If it were any larger, it might be called a "fender.")

Alex Lane
Local time: 07:55
Native speaker of: English
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

22 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
fender strip


Explanation:
On boats most kinds of protection of the hull are call fenders of one kind another. This would be likely to be a fender strip.

http://www.smartmarine.co.nz/white-dinghy-fender-strip-piece...

Gilla Evans
Local time: 14:55
Works in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 16

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Michel F. Morin: "Défense" definitely is "fender", and "fender strip" is found on Google !
54 mins
  -> Thanks Michel. It's certainly what we called them when I was a kid, too much time of which I spent on boats...

agree  Nikki Scott-Despaigne: "Fender strip" used slightly less than "rubbing strake" in my experience but I guess it's a family thing!
4 hrs
  -> It must be! I never ever heard anyone call it a rubbing strake, a new one on me! Thanks Nikki.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

26 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
rubbing strake


Explanation:
Today, generally, a strip of D-shaped rubber that runs the length of the boat.

On some small boats it's a thick rope.

The term comes from wooden boatbuilding : a plank thicker than the others or a sacrificial plank added to rub against the quay instead of all the planks doing so.

Plenty of images on the Web for "rubbing strake".

Some people talk about "fender" and "fendering".

Graham macLachlan
Local time: 15:55
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 352

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Nikki Scott-Despaigne: "rubbing strake" gets four times as many hits as "fender strip" but I have heard both used regularly.
4 hrs

agree  Bourth (X): I was going to suggest "rubbing strip", but it must be a family thing ;-)
5 hrs

agree  Clive Phillips: Rub-rail: Also rubbing strake or rub strake. An applied or thickened member at the rail, running the length of the boat; serves to protect the hull when alongside a pier or another boat. The rail may be protected with a rubber strip or rope.
7 hrs

agree  Jack Dunwell: I don't know about thickened members but rubbing strake is classic if less excitable
2 days 2 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs (or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.

KudoZ™ translation help

The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.


See also:

Your current localization setting

English

Select a language

Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search