s'en deprendre

English translation: to move further away from

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:s'en deprendre
English translation:to move further away from
Entered by: Julie Barber

01:08 May 27, 2006
French to English translations [PRO]
Social Sciences - Psychology / Gestalt Psychotherapy
French term or phrase: s'en deprendre
Context: "Le materiel apporte en psychotherappie fait l'objet de reprises. Pris et repris, parfois pour mieux **s'en deprendre.** Avoir prise, lacher prise..."

Does this refer to the giving up of the old, unproductive style of thinking about one's life in relation to circumstances and other people? This article has to do with the idea of psychological reparation.

Merci beaucoup.

femme
Barbara Cochran, MFA
United States
Local time: 11:36
to move further away from
Explanation:
I agree with Jennifer,although this is another suggestion...

or

for further detachment / a deeper sense of freedom
Selected response from:

Julie Barber
United Kingdom
Local time: 16:36
Grading comment
Thank you, juliebarba and everyone else who shared their ideas. I ended up translating this particular term as "distancing oneself from" which is really what you said, juliebarba, using more terms. In the same paragraph, I did use the phrase "to let go" for "laisser prise."
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3 +4to let go of / liberate oneself from
Jennifer Gal
3to move further away from
Julie Barber
3to divest oneself from it
Najib Aloui


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +4
to let go of / liberate oneself from


Explanation:
I think you are right. I have come across this terminology (s'en deprendre) in books about addiction. I just flipped through three books, and couldn't find a sentence with it. But I think I would translate it like this:

"Le materiel apporte en psychotherappie fait l'objet de reprises. Pris et repris, parfois pour mieux **s'en deprendre.** Avoir prise, lacher prise..."

"The topics brought up in therapy are often revisited. Visited, and revisited - sometimes to further let go of it [or "to further liberate oneself from it"]. "

As to the next sentence, I'm not sure I have a good translation. Maybe "Hold on, let go" or "Contract, release" or "Constrict, release". I realize that "lâcher prise" is a passive phrase, so it would be like "let yourself be taken". That's the sense it has in meditation, to let oneself be taken over by God/the universe/nothingness - whatever. You probably already knew this part anyway.

Hope this helps. If not, sorry. I'm open to clarification of my thinking (contextual pun). Best of luck with your work.

Jennifer Gal
Hungary
Local time: 17:36
Native speaker of: English

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  franglish: the better to let go
3 hrs
  -> thanks, Ench :)

agree  Julie Barber: let go is a real buzz word at the moment....
5 hrs
  -> Thanks Julie!

agree  gad
11 hrs
  -> Thanks again :)

agree  Diane de Cicco
15 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
to divest oneself from it


Explanation:
...

Najib Aloui
Local time: 16:36
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
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7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
to move further away from


Explanation:
I agree with Jennifer,although this is another suggestion...

or

for further detachment / a deeper sense of freedom

Julie Barber
United Kingdom
Local time: 16:36
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 3
Grading comment
Thank you, juliebarba and everyone else who shared their ideas. I ended up translating this particular term as "distancing oneself from" which is really what you said, juliebarba, using more terms. In the same paragraph, I did use the phrase "to let go" for "laisser prise."
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



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