le "tu" tue

English translation: don't use "you"s

14:47 Jun 26, 2012
French to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature
French term or phrase: le "tu" tue
This is from a text explaining that "I" statements are preferable to "you" statements because they don't make the listener defensive. There is a mnemonic pun in French - "le 'tu' tue." Is there an equivalent in English?
tatyana000
Local time: 12:43
English translation:don't use "you"s
Explanation:
My own invention, not an established phrase as far as I know
Selected response from:

Kate Collyer
United Kingdom
Local time: 11:43
Grading comment
Thanks so much! This is really clever!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3 +9don't use "you"s
Kate Collyer
3 +4I for life, You for strife
Wolf Draeger
4 +1Avoid the blame game
Diana Alsobrook
4 +1keep an "I" on the subject, use "you" and they'll object!
Kelly S
3 +1finger pointing
Verginia Ophof
4Remember: "you" yells
MatthewLaSon
3There's no "I" in "TEAM"
DLyons
3second person singular sends situations south
MatthewLaSon
2you is a downer
kashew


Discussion entries: 10





  

Answers


18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +9
don't use "you"s


Explanation:
My own invention, not an established phrase as far as I know

Kate Collyer
United Kingdom
Local time: 11:43
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Thanks so much! This is really clever!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Barbara Carrara: Brilliant, Kate!
6 mins
  -> Thanks Barbara! [blushes]

agree  Philippa Smith
17 mins
  -> Thanks Philippa!

agree  Rachel Fell
21 mins
  -> Thanks Rachel!

agree  Colin Rowe: Nice one!
27 mins
  -> Thanks Colin!

agree  Diana Alsobrook
44 mins
  -> Thanks Diana!

neutral  MatthewLaSon: Hello. The rhyme , or even alliteration, isn't nearly as important in the English translation as providing imagery of sudden offense. That's why I prefer something like: * 'you' yells * (more like "tue"). Rhyme or alliterat. is just icing on the cake.
1 hr
  -> Personally I feel that rhyme outweighs alliteration, though in this case the assonance does work. Each to their own, however.

agree  Rowena Fuller: must admit this is genius at work!
3 hrs
  -> Thanks Rowsie!

agree  Wolf Draeger: Excellent reproduction of the original effect.
3 hrs
  -> Thanks Wolf!

agree  Yvonne Gallagher
6 hrs
  -> Thanks gallagy2!

agree  Sandra & Kenneth Grossman: Nice!
18 hrs
  -> Thanks Sangro!

neutral  Kelly S: Although the word "yous " can have connotations of misrepresented plural "you" -often used in slang
1 day 6 hrs
  -> That would be why I placed my inverted commas carefully... It is after all going to be read, not spoken.
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21 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
le \"tu\" tue
Avoid the blame game


Explanation:
Avoid the blame game, use "I" statements.

This doesn't sum it up as nicely as the French version, it's just something I put together based on some search results (see below).


    Reference: http://www.pickthebrain.com/blog/youre-playing-the-blame-gam...
    Reference: http://www.jacobspilman.com/YouStatements.ppt
Diana Alsobrook
United Kingdom
Local time: 11:43
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in RomanianRomanian, Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Kate Collyer: This works perfectly for "prohiber l'accusation" rather than for "le 'tu' tue"
23 mins
  -> True, I was trying to find an option that rhymes in order to conserve the punny feel.

agree  Colin Rowe: I also like this a lot, but agree with Kate that it is better for the main part of the sentence rather than the bit in brackets.
30 mins
  -> Thanks, Colin! Maybe Tatyana can combine them.
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27 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
you is a downer


Explanation:
"You's a downer" wouldn't work, would it?

kashew
France
Local time: 12:43
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Vikki Pendleton: I think 'downer' is a bit colloquial for the context
33 mins

neutral  Rowena Fuller: You puts u down? Ugh Text language but follows your point....
3 hrs
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32 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
finger pointing


Explanation:
suggestion:

...over that defensive wall that is built as soon as the word YOU escape

Even if neither person is in the wrong for anything, eliminating “finger pointing words” opens the door to begin to see how the other person really feels.


    Reference: http://alwaysopeningdoors.com/blog/finger-pointing-words/
Verginia Ophof
Belize
Local time: 05:43
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 16

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  JH Trads
1 hr
  -> Thank you Hugo !!!
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58 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
second person singular sends situations south


Explanation:
Hello,

Perhaps this might work. This is a little longer than the French, but the alliteration is at least there.

I hopet his helps.

MatthewLaSon
Local time: 06:43
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 20

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Colin Rowe: If the target readership is British, I'm afraid this would need a translation of its own...
8 mins
  -> I like this translation for a North American audience. I don't care for any other of the translations thusfar proposed. But I'm sure the bandwagon mentality on ProZ will soon jump aboard. Most in the UK could easily figure out the meaning. Have a nice day

neutral  B D Finch: Like from foggy, rainy Manchester to the French or Italian Riviera? But, I do like the alliteration.
20 mins
  -> Well, is that what you would like to do? Usually the sunshine calls us south. On a more serious note, alliteration is the key here for a good translation.
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +4
I for life, You for strife


Explanation:
Lots of fun, this question :-) Couldn't resist adding another one:

I right, You fight (NOT a Chinese proverb, lol).

Must be dozens more, but so far none beats Kate's for the mnemonic effect.

Wolf Draeger
South Africa
Local time: 13:43
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 28

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Rowena Fuller: I like this one, (not the confuscious bit) but would have to be put in a strong context in order to make sense!
18 mins
  -> Xie xie, rowsie!

agree  Letredenoblesse
3 hrs
  -> Thanks Agnes.

agree  Yolanda Broad: Pretty cool phrasing.
10 hrs
  -> Thanks Yolanda.

agree  Yvonne Gallagher: I like this one also.
20 hrs
  -> Thanks gallagy.
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
keep an "I" on the subject, use "you" and they'll object!


Explanation:
Just a play on words as "keep an eye on" i.e be careful and I've thrown in a mnemonic rhyme.
Translation can be fun!! (sometimes:))

Kelly S
Ireland
Local time: 11:43
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Wolf Draeger: Kudos for the creativity, though it might be more suitable for children than managers/executives ;-)
2 hrs
  -> Thanks Wolf, sometimes there's not a big difference between some execs and kids
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23 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
There's no "I" in "TEAM"


Explanation:
Roughly similar.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 hrs (2012-06-26 19:06:55 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

@Colin/Rowsie. My slightly convoluted logic was that "team play" avoided the whole I/you issue by redirecting the focus. But I agree with you both - it doesn't some across that way!

DLyons
Ireland
Local time: 11:43
Works in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 5

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Colin Rowe: Isn't this rather the opposite? i.e. avoiding the word "I", not "you".
24 mins

neutral  Rowena Fuller: Colin has a point, the idea to avoid is the use of 'you' (finger pointing)
3 hrs
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9 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Remember: "you" yells


Explanation:
Hello,

I think the alliteration takes precedence in the French, but if you could do the rhyme, too, that would be great (but not so important). Plus you need a little imagination here for "tue". I think "yell" works well in English here for "kill", and that carries over the French alliteration. I would advise against "bland" words for "tue" here.


I hope this helps.

MatthewLaSon
Local time: 06:43
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 20
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