Collaboratrice

English translation: colleague

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:Collaboratrice
English translation:colleague
Entered by: Catherine CHAUVIN

18:40 Mar 3, 2008
French to English translations [Non-PRO]
Names (personal, company) / Vocabulaire/conversation
French term or phrase: Collaboratrice
Il s'agit de trouver le terme précis au féminin, sans qu'il soit fait mention du nom de la personne. Je ne vois pas comment je peux le formuler. Merci de votre aide ! :-)

Le Chef d'Agence doit écrire ou dire au téléphone à ses clients :

"J'ai entière confiance en ma -collaboratrice-, qui vous donnera toutes les explications nécessaires sur le produit qui vous intéresse.
Ma -collaboratrice- saura vous conseiller sur les différents accessoires proposés dans notre catalogue."
Catherine CHAUVIN
France
Local time: 02:11
my assistant/colleague
Explanation:
I prefer assistant

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Note added at 17 mins (2008-03-03 18:58:09 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I trust my assistant to give you...... , and she will also provide you with all the necessary advice relating to the various accessories...

Selected response from:

Ghyslaine LE NAGARD
New Caledonia
Local time: 12:11
Grading comment
Merci à tous pour les informations. Je vais choisir colleague, car il n'y a pas de notion de hiérarchie dans cette situation.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +9my assistant/colleague
Ghyslaine LE NAGARD
4personal assistant
Euqinimod (X)
3 -1associate
MatthewLaSon


Discussion entries: 7





  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +9
my assistant/colleague


Explanation:
I prefer assistant

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 17 mins (2008-03-03 18:58:09 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I trust my assistant to give you...... , and she will also provide you with all the necessary advice relating to the various accessories...



Ghyslaine LE NAGARD
New Caledonia
Local time: 12:11
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench, Native in EnglishEnglish
Grading comment
Merci à tous pour les informations. Je vais choisir colleague, car il n'y a pas de notion de hiérarchie dans cette situation.
Notes to answerer
Asker: Comment puis-je savoir qu'il s'agit d'une femme ? J'aimerais trouver le mot qui donnerait la nuance.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Rachel Vanarsdall: agree with "colleague". Perhaps replace the second "colleague" with "she"?
12 mins

agree  Tony M: I think 'colleague' is better, as it suggests less any kind of hierarchical element. There really isn't a way of showing the feminine, since we don't make the distinction in the same way in EN. And please, /not/ 'trust'!
14 mins

agree  rkillings: "I have utmost confidence that my assisant . . . "
20 mins

agree  Victoria Porter-Burns:
26 mins

agree  Michael GREEN: But I have to disagree with Tony - "assistant " is more appropriate : a "colleague" can be on the same level in the hierarchy, which is not the case with a "collaborateur-/trice", and certainly not the case here (the branch manager is talking to a client)
1 hr

agree  Irene McClure: agree to use the term 'assistant' but later in the phrase use the female pronoun to indicate that the assistant is female (if necessary!)
1 hr

agree  Jean-Claude Gouin: Agree with irenemcc ... and NewCal, of course ...
1 hr

disagree  Annabel Satin: Collaborateur/trice usually means that there are no hierarchical difference. To my understanding, the term would be closer to partner or associate. Although I am not sure considering the Branch Manager is talking ?
3 hrs

agree  Melissa McMahon: but only with 'colleague' - for reasons above - the term in French seems explicitly non-hierarchical and don't see the context calls for it
3 hrs

agree  sporran: with colleague
6 hrs

neutral  ormiston: I do think that the very fact the Chef d'Agence is reassuring customers about her expertise implies a level of heirarchy - would you say this of someone who is technically on a professional par ?
13 hrs

agree  ambonnardot: with colleague
2 days 22 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
personal assistant


Explanation:
Suggestion.

Euqinimod (X)
Local time: 02:11
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
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7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): -1
associate


Explanation:
Hello,

I think that ÿou could say "associate" for "collaboratrice."

7. a person who shares actively in anything as a business, enterprise, or undertaking; partner; colleague; fellow worker
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/associate




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Note added at 7 hrs (2008-03-04 02:36:56 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I'm not sure that this is an "assistant", but rather a partner or associate.

MatthewLaSon
Local time: 20:11
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Michael GREEN: This is a classic business context, and in France (where I worked in industry for 25 years) "collaboratrice" is always used for a subordinate (viz the fuss caused when Sarkozy described his prime minister as his "collaborateur").
5 hrs
  -> I guess you're right. In Québec, it may just mean "colleague" (no idea of subordinate).

neutral  ormiston: Michael's comment is in line with mine above, so the lady here must report to the Chef d'Agence
5 hrs
  -> Michael could be right the idea of not subordination in France. In Québec, it might not have any idea of subordination.

neutral  ambonnardot: I disagree with Michael, neither associate nor colleague assumes same level of authority with speaker. One can be an associate in a law firm which puts you under the authority of the partners for example. But in this context I prefer colleague.
2 days 14 hrs
  -> Thanks. I have to think more about this to be sure of anything.
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