déconfinement

English translation: lifting lockdown / easing/lifting of restrictions

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:déconfinement
English translation:lifting lockdown / easing/lifting of restrictions
Entered by: Tony M

15:12 May 11, 2020
French to English translations [Non-PRO]
Medical - Medical (general) / Covid-19 related restrictions
French term or phrase: déconfinement
I'm amazed this hasn't been asked already given what's happening today! I'm translating a set of guidelines from a company for employees returning to the office as lockdown measures are eased. "Déconfinement" is the title of the document, used on its own as the front page, so I'd like something that isn't too wordy. So far I've got "Lockdown Lifting" but I'm not entirely happy with it and wonder if anyone has a better equivalent.

Thanks in advance for your help!

(I wasn't quite sure how to label the 'field' as it's very much a general everyday reality right now and didn't seem to fit any of the specific categories!)
Sarah Day
Local time: 11:28
lifting lockdown
Explanation:
If you want to use your own suggestion, I'd certainly consider changing it from a noun 'lifting' qualified by 'lockdwon' (a typically FR construction!) and instead change it into a verb + noun construction (often more elegant in EN.

Otherwise, why not 'release from lockdown'? The use of 'lock' seems to invite 'release'.
Bear in mind that what we have been going through is not, strictly speaking, a 'lockdown', but more literally 'confinement' as used in FR; hence a few writers have been using 'deconfinement', which does have brevity in its favour, at least.


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Note added at 16 mins (2020-05-11 15:28:08 GMT)
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I think Jennifer's suggesting of 'easing' is best of all — since in truth, there are still certain restrictions, so it hasn't been 'lifted' entirely.
Likewise, I prefer Barbara"s use of 'restrictions', far less colourful and dramatic than the sensationalist (and now over-used) US term 'lockdown'.
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 12:28
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +6lifting lockdown
Tony M
5 +3Deconfinement
Libby Cohen
3 +4Returning to work after lockdown
Eloise Taylor
4 +2Lifting of lockdown
Pauline Teale
4 +2easing of lockdown restrictions
Keith Jackson
4 +1unlockdown
Drmanu49
4 +1Easing the lockdown
Lara Barnett
3 +2lifting of restrictions
Barbara Cochran, MFA
4Lifting lockdown
Rocsana Guignaudeau
4Lifting lockdown
Rocsana Guignaudeau
3easing of COVID-19 restrictions // easing of restrictions
Michael Grabczan-Grabowski
2recovery
Alison MacG


Discussion entries: 8





  

Answers


7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Lifting of lockdown


Explanation:
That's the phrase being used at the moment, or "relaxation of lockdown" is also possible

Pauline Teale
United Kingdom
Local time: 11:28
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Notes to answerer
Asker: Yes, my current working title is "Lockdown Lifting" based on what I'm used to hearing in the British press etc. but I still don't love it as a title! I think we just don't have a pithy one word way of saying it.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: I prefer 'relaxation', but I would try to avoid any construction using 'of', which almost always reeks of garlic ;-) I think Jennifer's 'easing' is also better still.
1 min

agree  Jennifer White: either suggestion - or "easing" maybe.https://www.businesswest.co.uk/blog/will-prime-minister-anno...
2 mins

agree  Paulina Sobelman: Lifting if it's complete or easing if it's in phases.
13 mins
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5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
lifting of restrictions


Explanation:
Not very literal, but that's what they're talking about.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 11 mins (2020-05-11 15:23:33 GMT)
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https://www.startribune.com/restrictions-could-be-lifted-on-...

Barbara Cochran, MFA
United States
Local time: 06:28
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 16
Notes to answerer
Asker: Yes indeed - I actually use this in the body of the translation, I just wondered if there was something better to use in the title, to make it less wordy.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M: I prefer 'restrictions' to any mention of 'lockdown', which seems a particularly sensationalist US term. Again, though, I prefer to try and get away from a too-French construction with 'of', by and large unnecessary. Jennifer's 'easing' is best of all.
5 mins

agree  Alexandre Tissot
6 mins
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7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +6
lifting lockdown


Explanation:
If you want to use your own suggestion, I'd certainly consider changing it from a noun 'lifting' qualified by 'lockdwon' (a typically FR construction!) and instead change it into a verb + noun construction (often more elegant in EN.

Otherwise, why not 'release from lockdown'? The use of 'lock' seems to invite 'release'.
Bear in mind that what we have been going through is not, strictly speaking, a 'lockdown', but more literally 'confinement' as used in FR; hence a few writers have been using 'deconfinement', which does have brevity in its favour, at least.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 16 mins (2020-05-11 15:28:08 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I think Jennifer's suggesting of 'easing' is best of all — since in truth, there are still certain restrictions, so it hasn't been 'lifted' entirely.
Likewise, I prefer Barbara"s use of 'restrictions', far less colourful and dramatic than the sensationalist (and now over-used) US term 'lockdown'.

Tony M
France
Local time: 12:28
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 168
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
Notes to answerer
Asker: Ooh yes I like "lifting lockdown"! I was wondering whether to use "deconfinement" to try to make it as close as possible to the French situation, but I wasn't sure if this sounded a bit too translated as people here in the UK are using "lockdown" rather than "confinement" to talk about the current situation.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  katsy
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Katsy!

agree  Reuben Wright: This is also an equally good option for "deconfinement". I agree, "unlockdown" sounds ugly and incorrect and, in print, looks even more like a grammatical mistranslation. https://www.bbc.com/news/explainers-52575313
4 hrs
  -> Thanks, Reuben!

agree  Daryo: yes, it's got to be gone completely, otherwise it would be wrong to use the prefix "dé"// from what I read the "lockdown" in UK was kid's play compared to how it was done in FR - for s.o. living in FR "lockdown" will resonate.
4 hrs
  -> Thanks, Daryo!

agree  Yvonne Gallagher: Lifting lockdown and/or easing restrictions are 2 most common ways of saying this
10 hrs
  -> Thanks, Yvonne!

agree  erwan-l
17 hrs
  -> Merci, Erwan !

agree  Lyle Mitzi: Yes, 'lifting lockdown' and/or 'easing lockdown' are the most natural-sounding.
2 days 6 mins
  -> Thanks, Lyle!
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25 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Lifting lockdown


Explanation:
Regardez les articles de la presse britannique concernant le déconfinement.
"Lifting lockdowns does not signal the end of COVID-19: WHO chief" source https://news.un.org/en/story/2020/04/1062172




    https://news.un.org/en/story/2020/04/1062172
Rocsana Guignaudeau
France
Local time: 12:28
Native speaker of: Native in RomanianRomanian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: I did already suggest this some time earlier.
22 mins

neutral  Yvonne Gallagher: Why duplicate?
10 hrs
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26 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Lifting lockdown


Explanation:
Regardez les articles de la presse britannique sur ce sujet.


    https://news.un.org/en/story/2020/04/1062172
Rocsana Guignaudeau
France
Local time: 12:28
Native speaker of: Native in RomanianRomanian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  writeaway: why post the same answer twice? And it was already posted earlier by someone else.
11 mins
  -> Sorry for answering twice, but when I have submitted the first time, my answer didn't appear next to the other answers, so I've tried again. I think I have the right to give the same answer as another person. In fact there are 3 identical answers.

neutral  Jennifer White: Roscsana - you should "agree" rather than post an identical answer. Proz etiquette!
46 mins

neutral  Daryo: you know that you can delete the repeated answer posted by mistake? (or possibly both ...)
4 hrs
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24 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
easing of lockdown restrictions


Explanation:
Not quite 'lifting', more like 'relaxing'...

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Note added at 33 mins (2020-05-11 15:45:04 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Sorry, didn't see Jennifer's suggestion in the comments...


    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-05-11/boris-johnson-announces-new-uk-coronavirus-lockdown-restrictions/12230824
Keith Jackson
France
Local time: 12:28
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M: Yes, I agree: 'easing ... restrictions' dilutes the use of 'lockdown'; still not too happy about including the often unnecessary 'of' though.
22 mins
  -> Thanks!

agree  writeaway
24 mins
  -> Thanks!

disagree  Drmanu49: No, there is no longer any lockdown which is different IMO. AS Tony said lockdown is an absolute: on or off
31 mins
  -> Yes, Johnson and Macron are struggling with that idea, too.

neutral  Rocsana Guignaudeau: For me there is a difference between "easing of lockdown restrictions" and "lifting the lockdown". "Lifting...." has a larger sense than "Easing the restrictions of..."
34 mins
  -> Yes, I agree. Not quite 'lifting', more like 'relaxing'...

disagree  Daryo: "easing of" is simply "a bit less of it" NOT "it's gone for good" - as confirmed by the recent "easing" in UK
4 hrs
  -> And yet, we talk here in France of déconfinement, and it is nowhere near completely gone.

agree  Michael Grabczan-Grabowski: Would be easily understood by all. Suits the purpose of the text. A lockdown can have various stages of intensity, and the text refers to the intensity of the lockdown is going down a notch (i.e. not entirely.) Daryo: https://cnn.it/3coQY9T - Прочитајте
4 hrs
  -> Thanks!

agree  Yvonne Gallagher: Yes, to ease lockdown restrictions (no "of). ///But no, a lockdown is a lockdown. As for (de/)confinement, not seen in UK English other than within quotation marks
10 hrs
  -> The entry is ‘easing lockdown restrictions´ for that reason. But in fact you can ease a lockdown.
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36 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Easing the lockdown


Explanation:
Perhaps one option...!

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Note added at 43 mins (2020-05-11 15:55:24 GMT)
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Alternatively: "Lockdown easing" (I prefer this way round).

"The First Minister earlier confirmed England's LOCKDOWN EASING does NOT apply in Scotland"
https://www.thescottishsun.co.uk/news/scottish-news/5545666/...

Example sentence(s):
  • "Boris Johnson speech: PM announces first EASING OF LOCKDOWN and sets out three-step plan"
  • "Boris Johnson's plan to EASE THE CORONAVIRUS LOCKDOWN"

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/global-health/science-and-disease/boris-johnson-speech-live-end-lockdown-watch-coronavirus-address/
    https://www.instituteforgovernment.org.uk/explainers/boris-johnson-plan-ease-coronavirus-lockdown
Lara Barnett
United Kingdom
Local time: 11:28
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: By its nature (and the reason it is the wrong term for what has been happening here) is that lockdown is an absolute: on or off; thus it cannot be 'eased' (whence the advantage of using 'restrictions')
13 mins

agree  Michael Grabczan-Grabowski: I like this one, because you've added some poetic flair to it. "Easing the lockdown," i.e. making it easier for employees, not just easing the restrictions. Corporate communication is normally bland as plain rice, so some might object to the tone...
3 hrs
  -> Thank you.

disagree  Daryo: maybe when you select a meaning for "easing" that suits your purpose. The way the "easing of the lockdown" just REALLY happened in UK it definitely wasn't the end ot it - far from that. It's only a different dose of the same "cure", NOT quitting the cure.
4 hrs

neutral  Yvonne Gallagher: You can't ease a lockdown
9 hrs
  -> So maybe you should tell that to the British government and the UK National press. I didn't make the term up.

agree  Lyle Mitzi: I've read quite a few news stories about this and 'easing' seems most common in the UK. The Financial Times uses it.
1 day 23 hrs
  -> Thank you.
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2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
unlockdown


Explanation:
• Chart: Unlockdown in Europe | Statista
www.statista.com › chart › dates-of-...
Traduire cette page
Unlockdown in Europe. by. Katharina Buchholz,. May 5, 2020. Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. Since mid-April, some Western European countries ...

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Note added at 2 minutes (2020-05-11 15:14:38 GMT)
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Coronavirus: 'Unlockdown' lessons from Ground Zero - world ...
www.hindustantimes.com › unlockd...
Traduire cette page
12 avr. 2020 - Coronavirus: 'Unlockdown' lessons from Ground Zero. Covid-19: Wuhan's reopening, starting April 8, is being watched by other countries for ...

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Note added at 15 minutes (2020-05-11 15:27:08 GMT)
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This is the term we were told to use for the Infectious Diseases Dpt

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 59 minutes (2020-05-11 16:11:00 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

ExplainSpeaking: The big decision on the unlockdown, its ...
indianexpress.com › Explained
Traduire cette page
28 avr. 2020 - ExplainSpeaking: The big decision on the unlockdown, its scope and reach. The PM-CMs meeting will give broad indications of the future course ...

Drmanu49
France
Local time: 12:28
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 4960

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: Notwithstanding the fact that some people appear to be using it, I hate this ugly expression and don't think we should encourage it!
10 mins
  -> I understand Tony but that is what we were told to use for the Infectious Diseases Dpt.

agree  philgoddard: Tony may not like this, but I think it's about to become a part of our everyday vocabulary. Boris Johnson is using it, and it's starting to appear in the media. You heard it here first!
33 mins
  -> Thank you Phil.

neutral  writeaway: Cutesy-poo word invented by Boris: https://www.stylist.co.uk/life/boris-johnson-end-lockdown-tw... anything it sounds like non-native EuroSpeak and the downward spiral of the English language
45 mins
  -> Definitely not invented by Boris and definitely the word we were instructed to use. You may not like it but it is the term you will have to bear with..

neutral  Jennifer White: Haven't heard it used here in the UK and doubt it will become widely used. Awful.//No thanks. His bumbling drives me up the wall......
4 hrs
  -> Listen to Boris Johnson.

neutral  Reuben Wright: I am also not a fan of this coined term; despite usage it looks incorrect, especially in print. Note the use of quotes for "unlockdown": https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/may/06/keir-starmer-c...
4 hrs

neutral  Keith Jackson: A new one to me. Reminds me of unbirthdays from AIWL.
5 hrs

neutral  Daryo: maybe technically correct, but really sounds awful.
5 hrs
  -> Yep but that's the term our editor told us to use.

neutral  SafeTex: Very unlikely to become the right expression so it's a bit like flogging a dead horse if we use it (and no one wants to use it either) Nothing personal, I'm talking about the word and in general
8 hrs

neutral  Yvonne Gallagher: No, no, no. That's awful. And we don't "have to bear with it at all". Haven't heard anyone use it, nor do I want to.
10 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +4
Returning to work after lockdown


Explanation:
Maybe I am going a bit far from the source but would it be possible to use something like this as the title of the document considering the context?
I would definitely translate this as lifting or easing of lockdown/restrictions/lockdown measures in other contexts but as I have understood it, the document is less about the lifting of measures as such and more about what measures the company is going to take now that the country is entering the process of 'déconfinement' and employees are coming back to work. I wonder if we might focus more on the return to work if naming this document in English?


Eloise Taylor
United Kingdom
Local time: 11:28
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Notes to answerer
Asker: I think this is actually a very good idea in the context of my document. Thanks Eloise.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Wolf Draeger: Spot on—or "Coming back to work" or even just "Back to work". Otherwise "easing/lifting" are the way to go, as you say.
5 hrs

agree  Michael Grabczan-Grabowski: This is a very good option, considering the context. A title like déconfinement certainly necessitates going away from the source a bit.
6 hrs

agree  Yvonne Gallagher: Yes, return to work as heading
9 hrs

agree  Verginia Ophof
10 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
recovery


Explanation:
A slightly different option.

The title of the document published by the UK government this afternoon is
OUR PLAN TO REBUILD:
The UK Government’s COVID-19 recovery strategy


Covid-19 : Des tests groupés pour un déconfinement plus rapide
https://www.polytechnique.edu/fr/content/covid-19-des-tests-...
Covid-19 : Group testing, key for a faster recovery
https://www.polytechnique.edu/en/content/covid-19-group-test...





Alison MacG
United Kingdom
Local time: 11:28
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks Alison for this hot off the press! Definitely useful to bear in mind for future translations although I don't think it fits the context of my document since it's specifically about the measures implemented for employees to return to work in their offices, so not about recovery as such. I'm actually thinking about simply using "Returning to Work" as my title.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Yvonne Gallagher: I thought recovery was about getting the economy going again?
9 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
Deconfinement


Explanation:
Perhaps this is region-specific, but here in Canada, this is the official term used by federal and provincial governments, as well as major media outlets.

Libby Cohen
Canada
Local time: 06:28
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Notes to answerer
Asker: Here in the UK we haven't been using "confinement" so I guess this would work for Canada but maybe not in the European context. My dilemma is that I'm writing in British English but for a French company, so I need the word to refer to the French context but sound right for speakers of British English. It's a tough one!

Asker: I'm now starting to ask myself whether English speakers living and working in France (my audience) are likely to be using "confinement"/"deconfinement" even though this is not what's being used here in the UK...


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M: And yes, I'd say it's very definitely being used by English-speakers around me here in France.
2 mins
  -> Thank you.

agree  SafeTex
18 mins
  -> Thank you.

agree  Reuben Wright
22 mins
  -> Thank you.

agree  John ANTHONY: It might not be as "academic" as required, but if under lockdown restrictions means £confined", then "deconfinement" gets my vote... We are just living through the experience today in France...!
49 mins
  -> Thanks. Same here in Montreal. Worst region in all of Canada for number of cases.

neutral  Michael Grabczan-Grabowski: It does appear to be region-specific. They opted to directly translate déconfinement in Québec. However, in English, it is a physics-related term. In Alberta, we say "easing of restrictions." // In reference to Québec only, yes. Not used in AB.
2 hrs
  -> Check CBC, National Post, Globe and Mail. All nation-wide outlets.

disagree  Yvonne Gallagher: It's a calque. Confinement has a different meaning in English than in its French use and hasn't been used to describe the Covid lockdown this side of the pond//I haven't seen it without quotation marks apart from French and Canadian news
17 hrs
  -> I guess The Guardian is no longer a "(European) English" news source, then! "Deconfinement" is used in major new stories there as recently as today (4 hours ago) as well as on April 28, April 20, and April 2, 2020.
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
easing of COVID-19 restrictions // easing of restrictions


Explanation:
I was hesitant to add yet another suggestion to this long list, but it's fascinating to see how many different terms have come out in different parts of the world. It really is hot off the press.

Due to the context of the document being aimed at a company's employees, I would be a bit more descriptive and say "Easing of COVID-19 restrictions." As others have commented, terms can be very regional (i.e. "deconfinement," "unlockdown," etc.), but stating the essence of the meaning plainly and descriptively is probably your best bet. You want people to immediately understand what the topic is about and not leave people scratching their heads on the latest neologism.

I particularly want to take issue with "deconfinement," because it's not a word used in English, except in the context of physics. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deconfinement. After all, "lockdown" or "COVID-19 restrictions" haven't normally been referred to as "confinement." Also, I'd be wary of relying on what the media has been circulating around, as authors of articles aren't necessarily translators, and they readily adopt false friends (like in Québec with déconfinement/deconfinement.) English news outlets now refer to the process of easing restrictions in Québec as "deconfinement," which is such an obvious adoption of the word using a direct translation. However, it's a false friend. A French-ism, if you will. The opposite of an anglicism.

If you walked down the street in a town in England and you asked someone randomly, "What do you think of deconfinement?" Do you think they'd know right away what you're referring to? How about "What do you think of the easing of COVID-19 restrictions?" ;-)

Michael Grabczan-Grabowski
Canada
Local time: 04:28
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Daryo: that would STILL be "confinement", just not at the same level / same intensity / same dose. // After yesterday's "easing" in UK there are still plenty of restrictions of all kind that haven't been lifted yet.
45 mins
  -> Да, Дарио. An "easing" entails lifting restrictions in stages, not all at once. I recommend carefully understanding the words in English. Also, nobody in the English-speaking world refers to the restrictions as "confinement." Хвала вам.

agree  Keith Jackson
59 mins
  -> Thanks, Keith! I like your suggestion too, actually, but I forgot to 'agree' on it. They refer to it as the easing of "lockdown" or "COVID-19 restrictions" here in Alberta, Canada.
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