chemin de fer

English translation: outline, overview

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:chemin de fer
English translation:outline, overview
Entered by: Stéphanie Soudais

18:19 Jun 20, 2006
French to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial - Management / Training
French term or phrase: chemin de fer
Pour cette raison, nous prenons l'hypothèse de réaliser un "{388}chemin de fer{389}" de chaque formation complété du {390}support de cours{391} correspondant.

That's the text that I've got. I asked the outsourcer for reference and all he could tell me was

that it is a didactic support :Une sorte de "track" avec deux rails et des traverses représentant des
étapes de la formation.

Now i'm really lost!
TIA
Nikeeta Kulkarni
India
Local time: 12:31
outline, overview
Explanation:
I've met this term in marketing and communication contexts where it has been used to describe a general overview of what is being required, a plan, a summary, a set of instructions. It is quite a general term and depending on the context a number of options are open.

"Outline" is one possibility among a whole range of others.
"Ch de fer" also used in computing to describe the thumbnails, which provide an outline/overview of the whole file...
Selected response from:

Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Local time: 09:01
Grading comment
Thanks Nikki!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5training ladder
B D Finch
4 +1A series of 'stations'/stages/levels
Jeffrey Lewis
4outline, overview
Nikki Scott-Despaigne
3track record
sarahl (X)


  

Answers


26 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Chemin de Fer (in this context)
track record


Explanation:
***

sarahl (X)
Local time: 00:01
Meets criteria
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 30
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13 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Chemin de Fer (in this context)
A series of 'stations'/stages/levels


Explanation:
It's a metaphor.

If you keep with the "railroad train", then you have a point of departure, and various 'stations' on the way to the 'destination', which is the completion of training.

The more usual way to represent this would be with a ladder - I don't know if this would be acceptable, but each rung or step of the ladder would be like the 'stations' on the track.

You could say it's a road or highway instead of a train track.

Or, it could just be a flight of stairsteps, each of which corresponds to a different part of the training.

The point is to provide a graphic representation of progress toward a goal.

The little engine that could!

Jeffrey Lewis
United States
Local time: 02:01
Does not meet criteria
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  LydieC: well explained, not an easy one, good luck Nikeeta
7 mins
  -> Thank you kindly!
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16 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Chemin de Fer (in this context)
training ladder


Explanation:
The client's explanation of the imagery of the two rails with sleepers is equivalent to the imagery of a ladder. This is a recognised term in education and training.
See for example iwanet website below:

"BENEFITS TO EMPLOYERS

"Helps identify employees with proven initiative, dedication and knowledge
Increases morale by giving employees a sense of direction and continued growth
"Creates a training ladder ..."
and ACUC training ladder on 2nd web reference.



    Reference: http://iwanet.org/profdevel/
    Reference: http://www.acuc.es/nivel.htm
B D Finch
France
Local time: 09:01
Does not meet criteria
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 52
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 day 12 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Chemin de Fer (in this context)
outline, overview


Explanation:
I've met this term in marketing and communication contexts where it has been used to describe a general overview of what is being required, a plan, a summary, a set of instructions. It is quite a general term and depending on the context a number of options are open.

"Outline" is one possibility among a whole range of others.
"Ch de fer" also used in computing to describe the thumbnails, which provide an outline/overview of the whole file...

Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Local time: 09:01
Does not meet criteria
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 28
Grading comment
Thanks Nikki!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



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