bordereaux de douane

English translation: custom duties

01:00 Mar 30, 2017
French to English translations [PRO]
Social Sciences - Government / Politics
French term or phrase: bordereaux de douane
I'm not sure what this means in the following context:

L’article 3 de la loi du 20 août 1996 indique que le Fonds est alimenté par des salaires de tous les fonctionnaires de l’État et de tous les employés du privé touchant plus que 5 000 gourdes ; une majoration des bordereaux de douane à l’exception des produits pétroliers, pharmaceutiques, alimentaires, les intrants agricoles et le papier, des plaques d’immatriculation et les vignettes, et des billet d’avion...

I put "customs documents" in my translation as a place holder, but I don't see how an increase in "customs documents" can supply a fund.

Article 3 of the Law of August 20, 1996 states that the Fund is supplied by the salaries of all civil servants and all private employees earning more than 5,000 gourdes; an increase in customs documents with the exception of petroleum products, pharmaceutical products, foodstuffs, agricultural inputs and paper, license plates and stickers, and airline tickets
Lauren-g
United States
Local time: 23:56
English translation:custom duties
Explanation:
only money can contribute to this "fund", so the only explanation that fits is that in their local jargon / local variant of French in Haiti they equate the form/document ("le borderau") with the tax that is being collected using that form (i.e. customs duties).

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Note added at 3 hrs (2017-03-30 04:44:30 GMT)
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as an analogue, think of "paying the invoice":

an "invoice" is no more than a piece of paper [or maybe not even that if it's an "electronic invoice"] so what you are in fact paying is the price for goods or services that is asked of you by the sender of the invoice.

Nevertheless, is anyone shocked and terminally baffled by the expression "paying the invoice"?

Strictly speaking it should be "paying the invoiced amount/price", no?
Selected response from:

Daryo
United Kingdom
Local time: 05:56
Grading comment
Thank you. This is the translation I used.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +5custom duties
Daryo
4 -1customs declaration forms
Francois Boye


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
customs declaration forms


Explanation:
my take

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Note added at 1 hr (2017-03-30 02:06:03 GMT)
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https://www.cbp.gov/sites/default/files/documents/CBP Form 6...

Francois Boye
United States
Local time: 00:56
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Daryo: so you paid your income tax for last year by sending a bundle of tax forms (instead of money) to the taxman?
2 hrs
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +5
custom duties


Explanation:
only money can contribute to this "fund", so the only explanation that fits is that in their local jargon / local variant of French in Haiti they equate the form/document ("le borderau") with the tax that is being collected using that form (i.e. customs duties).

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs (2017-03-30 04:44:30 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

as an analogue, think of "paying the invoice":

an "invoice" is no more than a piece of paper [or maybe not even that if it's an "electronic invoice"] so what you are in fact paying is the price for goods or services that is asked of you by the sender of the invoice.

Nevertheless, is anyone shocked and terminally baffled by the expression "paying the invoice"?

Strictly speaking it should be "paying the invoiced amount/price", no?

Daryo
United Kingdom
Local time: 05:56
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in SerbianSerbian, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 26
Grading comment
Thank you. This is the translation I used.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Nikki Scott-Despaigne: This is what is meant. However, it's nothing to do with its being a Haitian variant of French. This type of shortcut is used in metropolitain France too, all the time.
3 hrs
  -> Goes to prove once again than the context in which a term is used is more important that what a dictionary has to say, especially if you don't go past the first entry. Thanks!

agree  Ben Gaia: French can be baffling. Not all languages are as precise as Hungarian.
4 hrs
  -> Humans are not really very rational, so unsurprisingly all languages can be baffling from time to time - the logic of language is not as neat as the logic of exact sciences. Would be too easy / boring otherwise. Thanks!

agree  Terry Richards: See my discussion entry
6 hrs
  -> agree, a surcharge on every import operation is most likely the way they intend do it, in effect it's an increase in the tax rate i.e. the import duty rate. Thanks!

neutral  Francois Boye: Un bordereau n'est pas un droit de douane !
9 hrs
  -> the same way an invoice is not the consideration - have you read the explanation???

agree  AllegroTrans: baffling, but the only answer that makes sense
18 hrs
  -> at first it does sound baffling, but when I recall the weird/silly jargon of some professions I heard at close range, not so. Thanks! [just as a sample, try to make sense of this "if you don't do the swipe, you'll lose the door"]

agree  Gordon Matthews: custom duties (or customs duties?) is fine, although I think "import duties" might be better.
1 day 4 hrs
  -> for all practical purposes "import duties" should be fine but custom duties could also be levied on exported goods (theoretically at least, can't think of any real-life case). Thanks!
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