Passez! Adieu! Allez vous-en!

English translation: Leave! Farewell! Begone!

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:Passez! Adieu! Allez vous-en!
English translation:Leave! Farewell! Begone!
Entered by: B D Finch

09:54 Oct 20, 2019
French to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary - General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters / Louisiana French
French term or phrase: Passez! Adieu! Allez vous-en!
Hello everyone!
This is from Kate Chopin's the Awakening. Hence, I hope it is not wrong to consider it "Louisiana French" from the late 19th century.

The situation is about the way an alluring married woman (Mrs. Ratignolle) was treating a young man (Robert) who used adore her. Here is how their conversation goes:
[Robert is speaking to a third person, Mrs. Pontellier] "She knew that I adored her once, and she let me adore her. It was 'Robert, come; go; stand up; sit down; do this; do that;...'"
[Mrs. Ratignolle replying] "Par example! I never had to ask. You were always there under my feet, like a troublesome cat."
"You mean like an adoring dog. And just as soon as [Mr.] Ratignolle appeared on the scene, then it was like a dog. Passez! Adieu! Allez vous-en!"
"Perhaps I feared to make Alphonse jealous,"...

What does those French exclamations mean within this context? Thanks in advance :)
vitaminBcomplex
Local time: 06:41
Leave! Farewell! Begone!
Explanation:
I think this might be suitable for the period.
Selected response from:

B D Finch
France
Local time: 05:41
Grading comment
Thank you very much
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +4Go away! Goodbye for ever! Get out of here!
Tony M
4 +2Leave! Farewell! Begone!
B D Finch
2 +1Shoo! Beat it! And don't come back!
Wolf Draeger
3 -2Go on! Bye bye! Shove off/Get lost!
Anne Schulz


Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


38 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
Go away! Goodbye for ever! Get out of here!


Explanation:
fairl literally, but i'm sure you have the idea and can come up with some more culturally- and period-appropriate colloquial terms.

Tony M
France
Local time: 05:41
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 328

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Cyril Tollari
52 mins
  -> Merci, Cyril !

agree  Chakib Roula
2 hrs
  -> Shukran, Chakib!

agree  Michele Fauble
8 hrs
  -> Merci, Michele !

agree  Yvonne Gallagher
9 hrs
  -> Thanks, Yvonne!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): -2
Go on! Bye bye! Shove off/Get lost!


Explanation:
More options

Anne Schulz
Germany
Local time: 05:41
Works in field
Native speaker of: German

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  B D Finch: Not the way anyone spoke in the 19th century!// No, when translating literature the register is essential and must be appropriate for the period, class etc.
2 hrs
  -> That's right, however, as we learned, no 19th century translation is required, but a flavor of the words to be used as an explanation for 21st century readers.

disagree  AllegroTrans: Definitely not 19th century usage: I am sure the asker wants to retain the correct period flavour
1 day 49 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

9 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Leave! Farewell! Begone!


Explanation:
I think this might be suitable for the period.

B D Finch
France
Local time: 05:41
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 136
Grading comment
Thank you very much

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M
9 mins
  -> Thanks Tony

agree  AllegroTrans: Retains the period flavour
22 hrs
  -> Thanks AT
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Shoo! Beat it! And don't come back!


Explanation:
Perhaps I'm reading too much into the dialogue (hence low confidence), but my hunch is that the exclamations are meant to give the cuckolded husband the impression that his wife is being pestered and is trying to drive the unwanted flirt/suitor/traveling salesman (lol) away—with a "Thank goodness you're here, honey!" to top it off.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 7 hrs (2019-10-20 17:37:45 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Other options: Scat! Leave me alone!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 10 hrs (2019-10-20 19:56:20 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

As BD points outs, "beat it" was probably not in use at the time of the novel (see https://greensdictofslang.com/entry/22nqbqy), so I would replace it with "scat" (see https://greensdictofslang.com/entry/mnecqia).

'Shoo! Scat! And don't come back!'
'Shoo! Scat! Leave me alone!'

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 day 9 hrs (2019-10-21 19:21:10 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Although the question is closed, for future reference I do want to defend my answer in terms of its suitability for the period.

First recorded uses of "shoo" predate the setting of the novel by a long way. The ODE traces its origins in late Middle English and dates verb use from early C17. Collins traces it to C15 (related to Middle High German schū, French shou, Italian scio). Cassel's Dictionary of Word Histories defines it as 'begone, be off' and traces its orgins to C14-15.

The ODE, Collins & Cassel's date "scat" in C19, and as I noted above, Jonathon Green, the world's preeminent expert on English slang, also trace its use to C19.

Wolf Draeger
South Africa
Local time: 05:41
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 34
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thank you for the details, Wolf!


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  B D Finch: Not sure about "Beat it" in a 19th century novel.
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Barbara! Good point.

agree  Lucy Galbraith: I like that this keeps the dog comparison going!
15 hrs
  -> Yes, thanks, Lucy!

disagree  AllegroTrans: Definitely not 19th century usage: I am sure the asker wants to retain the correct period flavour
1 day 8 mins
  -> See my last note.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs (or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.

KudoZ™ translation help

The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.


See also:

Your current localization setting

English

Select a language

Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search