Débarquer

English translation: Arrive

08:05 Oct 1, 2019
French to English translations [PRO]
Marketing - General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters
French term or phrase: Débarquer
I recently translated a promotional video for an American burger chain and i used an almost literal translation (oops) , I said 'in 2018 xxx landed in France' (xxx a atterri en France), they were already operating in France when the translation and video were done. Now I need to do another translation for another restaurant from the same parent company - the French is 'xx debarque en France ' (they haven't yet arrived but will be in the coming weeks). I translated this as 'xxx is coming to France' but they want 'is landing in France' (they think it's more punchy, I disagree). Somehow it just doesn't work in the present continuous / future tense but it did work in the past tense. I would love your opinions on this please.
Laura Player
France
Local time: 11:32
English translation:Arrive
Explanation:
In the commercial context you describe, I would use something like "......... finally arrives in France" or just "........ arriving soon in France". "Debarquer" doesn't need to be translated literally, especially for an advertising context, you just need to keep the notion of anticipation and something big about to happen (like a ship/plane arriving). You'll need to use your imagination based on what you know about the company and the type of document this is. Debarquer can also denote a sudden arrival, this is the notion you need to retain. For example like something "hitting" the market.
Selected response from:

Sasha Barral
France
Local time: 11:32
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +2launch
philgoddard
4 +2Arrive
Sasha Barral
3(set to) touch down
Adrian MM.


Discussion entries: 14





  

Answers


36 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Debarquer
launch


Explanation:
Or "is coming to". But "land" is just plain wrong in my opinion, unless it's a play on words involving boats or aircraft.

philgoddard
United States
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 155

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Carol Gullidge: I see nothing wrong with “lands in France”, but really like “launch”! ... launching / about to launch in France. Even though launch and land are opposites ;)
8 mins

agree  B D Finch: As Carol notes, "launch and land are opposites"; a "launch" is a start of something, while "landing" can be either the start or the end of something.
57 mins

agree  AllegroTrans
2 hrs

disagree  Ian Davies: 'Launch' is very pedestrian IMHO, just part of the standard marketing vernacular. "About to hit' is much more dynamic. 'About to take France by storm' wouldbe another similar phrase.
3 hrs
  -> "Hit" and "take by storm" are overtranslation.

neutral  Julie Barber: Hi deleted my response by mistake. This is correct but I do agree with Ian (pedestrian did make me chuckle...). It is bland considering their request
6 hrs

disagree  Francois Boye: to land
6 hrs

agree  Nikki Scott-Despaigne: Launch works if they are completey new. (Funny how "launch" works well for "land", opposites really). "Is about to hit FR" is what first sprung to mind for me. "Is about to + xxx" makes it idomatic. "Land" sounds anti-dynamic as it marks the end of sthg.
1 day 5 hrs

neutral  SafeTex: For me, "launch" is a transitive verb so I hesitate on this
4 days
  -> Websters: Intransitive verb 1 a : to spring forward : TAKE OFF b : to enter energetically
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

12 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
(set to) touch down


Explanation:
xxx is set to touch (splash) down in France vs. touch base there or 'is hitting the ground (running').

Not too sure why the US/Can. clients' (Eagles have) landed turn of phrase is that incongruous. Query the literal: 'is disembarking'.

Example sentence(s):
  • The Westfield Matildas have touched down in France ahead of 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup.

    Reference: http://www.brisbaneroar.com.au/news/westfield-matildas-touch...
    Reference: http://eng.proz.com/personal-glossaries/entry/2184447-debarq...
Adrian MM.
United Kingdom
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 day 7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Arrive


Explanation:
In the commercial context you describe, I would use something like "......... finally arrives in France" or just "........ arriving soon in France". "Debarquer" doesn't need to be translated literally, especially for an advertising context, you just need to keep the notion of anticipation and something big about to happen (like a ship/plane arriving). You'll need to use your imagination based on what you know about the company and the type of document this is. Debarquer can also denote a sudden arrival, this is the notion you need to retain. For example like something "hitting" the market.

Sasha Barral
France
Local time: 11:32
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Cyril Tollari
1 day 7 hrs

agree  AllegroTrans
7 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs (or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.

KudoZ™ translation help

The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.


See also:

Your current localization setting

English

Select a language

Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search