cdt

English translation: rgds

16:55 Sep 7, 2019
French to English translations [Non-PRO]
General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters / abbreviation used as a closing in an email
French term or phrase: cdt
Hi there -

I am translating a series of emails that of course contain all the expected short hand kind of language most of use in them.

Most of the emails have as a closing, common words/phrases such as:
Amitiés, Cordialement, A plus tard, etc. followed by the sender's name

However in one I have:
cdt,
Jacques

I have no idea what cdt could stand for here.

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks!
Michael
opera1
United States
Local time: 16:23
English translation:rgds
Explanation:
Not a translation as such but an equivalent shot-form ending that is often used in e-mails
rgds = regards

RGDS means "Regards" So now you know - RGDS means "Regards" - don't thank us. YW! What does RGDS mean? RGDS is an acronym, abbreviation or slang word that is explained above where the RGDS definition is given.
RGDS - Internet Slang

https://www.internetslang.com › RGDS-meaning-definition
Selected response from:

AllegroTrans
United Kingdom
Local time: 21:23
Grading comment
I think this is the perfect equivalent of the abbreviation for cordialement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +4yours most cordially, etc.
Tony M
4 +4rgds
AllegroTrans
3 +1best
Beatriz Ramírez de Haro


Discussion entries: 5





  

Answers


4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
best


Explanation:
"Best" (short for "best wishes") is a good equivalent of "cdt" for common business emails. I get both closings from my French and English speaking clients, and both seem to be equally criticised by purists.

https://www.merriam-webster.com/words-at-play/best-as-a-lett...
Usage of best to close correspondence has since flourished. Certainly, there are critics of this 4-letter, elliptical valediction;

Quelle formule de politesse utiliser dans un mail professionnel ?
https://www.cadremploi.fr/editorial/conseils/conseils-carrie...
Conseil : évitez toute forme d'abréviation du type "CDT" ou "bien cdt".

«Cordialement,» : la formule de politesse la plus détestable ?
http://www.lefigaro.fr/vie-bureau/2015/03/19/09008-20150319A...
«Cordialement», et ses infâmes abréviations «Cdt», «Cdlmt»

Formule de politesse dans un e-mail : que choisir ? - JDN
https://www.journaldunet.fr/management/guide-du-management/1...
Si cordialement peut être utilisé dans certains cas de figure énumérés ci-dessus, il n'est pas recommandé d'opter pour une abréviation comme "Cdt" ou "bien Cdt".

Beatriz Ramírez de Haro
Spain
Local time: 22:23
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: There is a vestige of the underlying formality in 'cdt' that is not really conveyed by 'best wishes', which is somehow more personal / friendly.
8 hrs
  -> Thanks Tony, and I also agree with Allegro.

agree  Stephanie Benoist
21 hrs
  -> Merci Stephanie.
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +4
cdt > cordialement
yours most cordially, etc.


Explanation:
Of course, we simply don't use that sort of expression any more in EN, and the register would be completely wrong here.

Probably, all we might say in an equivalent context might be 'yours', which hardly needs abbreviating.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 13 hrs (2019-09-08 06:06:18 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Even though this abbreviation may be used rather more flippantly these days, I believe there is still a notion of 'respect between peers' — it's not the sort of thing you would say to an obvious inferior, nor to an obvious superior ('your humble servant', etc., complete with aspidistras!) But it is also not really a sort of friendly greeting between pals.
I think Allegro has hit the nail perfectly on the head with 'regards', which to me conveys exactly the same level of mutual respect, and is what I use most of the time in my own (informal) business correspondence.

Tony M
France
Local time: 22:23
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 320

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Yvonne Gallagher: Of course
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Yvonne!

agree  Julie Barber: I often see it written as Cdlt
1 hr
  -> Thnaks, Julie! Not personally encountered that one.

agree  AllegroTrans: Equivalent would be "rgds" ffor an email, I see it all the time
7 hrs
  -> Thanks, C! Oh yes, you should enter that as an answer!

agree  Ph_B (X)
10 hrs
  -> Merci, Ph_B !
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22 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
rgds


Explanation:
Not a translation as such but an equivalent shot-form ending that is often used in e-mails
rgds = regards

RGDS means "Regards" So now you know - RGDS means "Regards" - don't thank us. YW! What does RGDS mean? RGDS is an acronym, abbreviation or slang word that is explained above where the RGDS definition is given.
RGDS - Internet Slang

https://www.internetslang.com › RGDS-meaning-definition

AllegroTrans
United Kingdom
Local time: 21:23
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 83
Grading comment
I think this is the perfect equivalent of the abbreviation for cordialement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M: Yes, and I think this has the advantage of being closest in register, at least if 'cordialement' is being used with its traditional sense.
9 mins
  -> tks and mcbcp

agree  Cyril Tollari
3 hrs
  -> tks CT

agree  Victoria Britten
4 hrs
  -> tks

agree  Beatriz Ramírez de Haro
4 hrs
  -> ths
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