livret ordinaire de dépassement

English translation: surplus/spare/supplementary (linked) savings account

03:14 Dec 6, 2019
French to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial - Finance (general) / Type of savings account
French term or phrase: livret ordinaire de dépassement
"Le livret réglementé relève de la garantie de l'Etat et le(s) livret(s) ordinaire(s) de dépassement associé(s) de la garantie des Dépôts."

CCM bank.

This question has been asked before here to no avail.
Conor McAuley
France
Local time: 14:16
English translation:surplus/spare/supplementary (linked) savings account
Explanation:
Whenever I work on a text dealing with (or merely touching on) the French banking and taxation systems, a single term can turn into a bottomless rabbit hole, and this feels a bit like that.

So it seems the most popular savings account in France is the Livret A which is a type of compte d'épargne réglementé. Such accounts pay a fixed rate of interest (set by law) and are capped. But the interest is not taxed and all amounts are fully covered by deposit insurance.

Then you have types of savings accounts that are ordinaires meaning the interest earned on them is taxed and deposit insurance covers the amounts only up to a point.

I guess this partly explains why (untaxed) livrets réglementés are covered directly by the State and (taxed) livrets ordinaires are covered by the FGDR, even though it boils down to the same deposit insurance in both cases.

So much for cursory background. Where does dépassement come in? My best guess is that anyone wanting to put more of their money in a savings account (as opposed to insurance or riskier investments) will open one and link it to their Livret A or similar account so that all 'overflows' are automatically transferred to this additional savings account.

I've never heard of this kind of setup and have no idea if it exists outside France or in the Anglosphere. If you don't have the space to explain how French bank accounts work, perhaps "surplus", "spare" or even "supplementary" give enough of an idea (with "linked" as an optional add-on).

Bottom links relate to the Livret A; I'll add a bunch of other links in a minute.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 day 16 hrs (2019-12-07 19:49:48 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compte_d'épargne
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Types_de_dépôts_bancaires

https://mabanque.bnpparibas/fr/epargner/comptes-livrets-epar...
https://www.cbanque.com/placement/fiscalite.php

https://www.francetransactions.com/epargne/Livret-A.html
https://www.francetransactions.com/epargne/livret-a-plafond-...
https://www.francetransactions.com/epargne/Livrets-epargne-c...

https://www.boursedescredits.com/guide-depasser-plafond-livr...
https://www.capitaine-epargne.com/actualite-epargne/livret-r...

https://www.legifrance.gouv.fr/affichCode.do;jsessionid=EF1E...
Selected response from:

Wolf Draeger
South Africa
Local time: 15:16
Grading comment
Many thanks to everybody for your input.
I think ordinary is NOT in opposition to "réglementé" (as the whole of the financial products products and services market is regulated by the ACPR), it means "taxable".
That's my take on it.
To a great extent it's a culture-specific term, hence "overflow" in inverted commas.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 -1over-the-limit ordinary saving account
Daryo
4 -1excess/over contribution to a saving booklet
Francois Boye
2surplus/spare/supplementary (linked) savings account
Wolf Draeger


Discussion entries: 12





  

Answers


1 day 13 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
over-the-limit ordinary saving account


Explanation:
On its own "over-the-limit ordinary saving account" does sound puzzling, about as much as "livret ordinaire de dépassement" - if you don't know the system and wonder what on earth could "dépassement" be referring to.

If you fancy it, you could also write a short story:

"ordinary saving account used to transfer payments made into a special privileged saving account that are over the allowed limit "

Whoever is reading this text MUST at some point take the trouble the take a close look a the whole system of "Livret A" and the linked "livret ordinaire de dépassement", so this should be enough.

BTW, I can't see nothing wrong with "overflow" - just because there are no accounts in UK of the "overflow (from some other account)" variety is no reason to discard a term that is perfectly illustrating what the account is used for.

I don't see why an "overflow account" would be more shocking than having boots and cakes in your computer ... (boot sector / booting / cookies ...)


Daryo
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:16
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in SerbianSerbian, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 179

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Francois Boye: livret, said the text!
14 mins
  -> So what? For all practical purposes it's an account.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 day 11 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
excess/over contribution to a saving booklet


Explanation:
https://www.google.com/search?q=over contribution&ei=GLnrXZy...


https://www.boursedescredits.com/guide-depasser-plafond-livr...


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 day 11 hrs (2019-12-07 14:42:36 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Erratum: SAVINGS instead of saving

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 day 13 hrs (2019-12-07 17:05:07 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

https://www.boursedescredits.com/guide-depasser-plafond-livr...

Francois Boye
United States
Local time: 08:16
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 266

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Ph_B (X): "excess/over" should apply to the savings account (assuming this is the right expression in E), not to the payments. The savings account described as ordinaire is "in excess of" the underlying (réglementé) account, not the amounts themselves
22 mins
  -> THe attachment in French is crystal clear: savings booklet stands for the balance of the same.//Agreed: the excess results from a rule: see the attachment in French.

disagree  Daryo: what this says is: you put too much in some account, not quite the same as "this account is used to put into it excess payments into some other account" WHICH IS WHAT IT IS - if you take the trouble to explore the context (yes, that dirty word again ...)
1 hr
  -> WHO SAID THAT: "this account is used to put into it excess payments into some other account"? Not me!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 day 16 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
surplus/spare/supplementary (linked) savings account


Explanation:
Whenever I work on a text dealing with (or merely touching on) the French banking and taxation systems, a single term can turn into a bottomless rabbit hole, and this feels a bit like that.

So it seems the most popular savings account in France is the Livret A which is a type of compte d'épargne réglementé. Such accounts pay a fixed rate of interest (set by law) and are capped. But the interest is not taxed and all amounts are fully covered by deposit insurance.

Then you have types of savings accounts that are ordinaires meaning the interest earned on them is taxed and deposit insurance covers the amounts only up to a point.

I guess this partly explains why (untaxed) livrets réglementés are covered directly by the State and (taxed) livrets ordinaires are covered by the FGDR, even though it boils down to the same deposit insurance in both cases.

So much for cursory background. Where does dépassement come in? My best guess is that anyone wanting to put more of their money in a savings account (as opposed to insurance or riskier investments) will open one and link it to their Livret A or similar account so that all 'overflows' are automatically transferred to this additional savings account.

I've never heard of this kind of setup and have no idea if it exists outside France or in the Anglosphere. If you don't have the space to explain how French bank accounts work, perhaps "surplus", "spare" or even "supplementary" give enough of an idea (with "linked" as an optional add-on).

Bottom links relate to the Livret A; I'll add a bunch of other links in a minute.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 day 16 hrs (2019-12-07 19:49:48 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compte_d'épargne
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Types_de_dépôts_bancaires

https://mabanque.bnpparibas/fr/epargner/comptes-livrets-epar...
https://www.cbanque.com/placement/fiscalite.php

https://www.francetransactions.com/epargne/Livret-A.html
https://www.francetransactions.com/epargne/livret-a-plafond-...
https://www.francetransactions.com/epargne/Livrets-epargne-c...

https://www.boursedescredits.com/guide-depasser-plafond-livr...
https://www.capitaine-epargne.com/actualite-epargne/livret-r...

https://www.legifrance.gouv.fr/affichCode.do;jsessionid=EF1E...


    Reference: http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Livret_A
    Reference: http://www.economie.gouv.fr/particuliers/livret-a
Wolf Draeger
South Africa
Local time: 15:16
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 18
Grading comment
Many thanks to everybody for your input.
I think ordinary is NOT in opposition to "réglementé" (as the whole of the financial products products and services market is regulated by the ACPR), it means "taxable".
That's my take on it.
To a great extent it's a culture-specific term, hence "overflow" in inverted commas.
Notes to answerer
Asker: Wow, thanks Wolf!


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Ph_B (X): with 'supplementary'. Dépassement means nothing else than "being over the limit". It does not imply any automatic overflow.
5 mins
  -> Ta, and thanks for your correction & insider view.

disagree  Daryo: similar setup does exist at least in UK (TESSA) + ALL accounts are "regulated" i.e. banks must obey rules whatever is the type of account - the point is that "livret A" is tax-free! other accounts are ALSO "regulated" but subject to income tax.
4 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs (or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.

KudoZ™ translation help

The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.


See also:

Your current localization setting

English

Select a language

Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search