à la sonnette

English translation: using a buzzer (tester)

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase: « à la sonnette »
English translation:using a buzzer (tester)

06:25 Apr 27, 2015
    The asker opted for community grading. The question was closed on 2015-04-30 07:54:08 based on peer agreement (or, if there were too few peer comments, asker preference.)


French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Electronics / Elect Eng
French term or phrase: à la sonnette
This phrase refers to a "wire-to-wire" test of some electrical connections.

Ce test peut être réalisé « à la sonnette »
merlrennes
Local time: 21:24
using a buzzer (tester)
Explanation:
We do also use the rather dated expression of using a 'ringer', or 'ringing through' — however, that would probably sound odd in many contemporary contexts, so I'd recommend using 'buzzer' instead here.

Of course, it may not necessarily be an actual buzzer — these days, it is probably more likely to go 'beep'. But AFAIK the term still stays the same.

In other contexts, the actual device might be referred to as a 'sounder' — but I'm not at all sure it would be called that in this specific context.

Why not try researching some multimeteres and other similar test devices that have this sort of facility, and see just what terminology is currently most widespread?
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 21:24
Grading comment
Thanks Tony
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +3using a buzzer (tester)
Tony M


  

Answers


16 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
« à la sonnette »
using a buzzer (tester)


Explanation:
We do also use the rather dated expression of using a 'ringer', or 'ringing through' — however, that would probably sound odd in many contemporary contexts, so I'd recommend using 'buzzer' instead here.

Of course, it may not necessarily be an actual buzzer — these days, it is probably more likely to go 'beep'. But AFAIK the term still stays the same.

In other contexts, the actual device might be referred to as a 'sounder' — but I'm not at all sure it would be called that in this specific context.

Why not try researching some multimeteres and other similar test devices that have this sort of facility, and see just what terminology is currently most widespread?

Tony M
France
Local time: 21:24
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 2031
Grading comment
Thanks Tony
Notes to answerer
Asker: Many thanks Tony. I thought this was the sense of it


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  chris collister: Occasionally "beeper", "bleeper", but buzzer is the most common.
49 mins
  -> Thanks, Chris! I agree.

agree  B D Finch
1 hr
  -> Thanks, B! :-)

agree  claude-andrew: "Buzzer" appears to be the buzz-word
1 day 37 mins
  -> Thanks, Claude!
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