Douille Volante

English translation: flying / loose lampholder [specifically, for fluorescent tube]

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:douille volante
English translation:flying / loose lampholder [specifically, for fluorescent tube]
Entered by: Tony M

11:52 Oct 21, 2012
French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Electronics / Elect Eng / Lighting
French term or phrase: Douille Volante
This is another piece from a lighting catalogue. Douille as 'Lamp Holder' for fluorescent tubes is not a problem but I'm struggling to make a distinction between a standard "Douille" and a "douille volante". A typical sentence is:

Compatible avec douilles ¼ de tour ou douilles volantes

The first type is a ¼ turn fastener type lamp holder - but can anyone suggest a term for the "douille volante" to distinguish it from the former type?

Thanks
Steve Sutcliffe
United Kingdom
Local time: 02:59
loose lampholder
Explanation:
This it the kind that usually hangs on its wires, the tube is held in clips, and the 'ends' are plugged on manually; in other words, the functions of mechanically retaining the tube and making the electrical connections to it have been separated.

I'd be a litte wary of 'lampholder' (since it no longer is, really!), and wonder if 'tube connector' mightn't be better? But you ought to be able to research that part fairly easily yourself.

Do note that it could even be 'flying...' — there are many fields where we talk, for example, of 'flying leads'.

'lamp connector' appears to be quite widely used in connection with 'fluorescent tube'

http://www.covershield.co.uk/Lampholder.html

Despite its shamefully bad English, this page does illustrate various common types of connector for fluorescent tubes; among others, the model T8BH80 (you may need to scroll down to see it) illustrates the 'flying' type of holder referred to by asker with 'douille volante'.
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 03:59
Grading comment
Thanks Tony - I went with this even though we don't really seem to use it - I had to distinguish between the two types of douille somehow :-)
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4socket
Didier Fourcot
4loose lampholder
Tony M
3clip in tube
Alison Sparks (X)


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


27 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
clip in tube


Explanation:
There are new neon tubes which just clip in and are not turned.

I found the following comment:

Il existe des douilles "enbrochables" , "douilles volantes" où on ne fait pas tourner les tubes, on se contente de les clipser sur les broches.

picture at ref. below of new fitting


    Reference: http://www.prozic.com/www2/info_promo_G13SUPVOLST_non.html
Alison Sparks (X)
Local time: 03:59
Native speaker of: English

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: That's not a 'new' type, Alison — in fact, this is the traditional 'push-on' type, which pre-dates the modern 'clip-in (and turn)' types. So I think your suggestion could be confusing here. / Certain 'new' fittings still use 'old-style' connectors.
25 mins
  -> This was on a devis for a 'new' fitting from qualified electrician.
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
douille volante
loose lampholder


Explanation:
This it the kind that usually hangs on its wires, the tube is held in clips, and the 'ends' are plugged on manually; in other words, the functions of mechanically retaining the tube and making the electrical connections to it have been separated.

I'd be a litte wary of 'lampholder' (since it no longer is, really!), and wonder if 'tube connector' mightn't be better? But you ought to be able to research that part fairly easily yourself.

Do note that it could even be 'flying...' — there are many fields where we talk, for example, of 'flying leads'.

'lamp connector' appears to be quite widely used in connection with 'fluorescent tube'

http://www.covershield.co.uk/Lampholder.html

Despite its shamefully bad English, this page does illustrate various common types of connector for fluorescent tubes; among others, the model T8BH80 (you may need to scroll down to see it) illustrates the 'flying' type of holder referred to by asker with 'douille volante'.

Tony M
France
Local time: 03:59
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 2065
Grading comment
Thanks Tony - I went with this even though we don't really seem to use it - I had to distinguish between the two types of douille somehow :-)

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  chris collister: "Loose" is a bit ambiguous (rattly?). I'm OK with "flying"...
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, Chris! Well, we do have things like a 'loose plug' that is understandable in context, so I think it could work OK; but 'flying' may be safest, as you say.
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1 day 2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
socket


Explanation:
I suggest to use "lamp holder" for the "1/4 turn" type from the source, because it does actually hold the lamp by its ends, but the "loose" type at the end of a flexible cable may be simply called "socket":
http://www.aquaworld.ie/56,554,waterproof-tube-socket-t5-16m...

The difference between a lamp holder and a socket seems rather blurred per references below, but if we need to make a difference I see more "fixed" lamp holders and more "loose" sockets


    Reference: http://www.surplussales.com/electrical/Fluorescent/FluorLamp...
    Reference: http://www.bulbman.com/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=8945_...
Didier Fourcot
Local time: 03:59
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 43
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