lustre d'antan

English translation: former heights

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:lustre d'antan
English translation:former heights
Entered by: Travelin Ann

14:17 Mar 7, 2011
French to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial - Economics / Japanese economy
French term or phrase: lustre d'antan
Hi

I actually asked a similar question before, but the excellent answers don't quite fit this context which is Japan's economy:

"Le Japon ne pourra pas retrouver son lustre d'antan de sitôt, en déclin depuis le début des années 1990s"

I find English tends to be more straightforward when writing about the economy, hence "bygone splendours" and the like doesn't, to my mind, fit here. I'd also like something that will link to the following part, i.e. something which can be "in decline since the early 1990s."

Thanks very much!
Sandra Petch
Local time: 02:17
recent heights
Explanation:
something one hears/reads quite often in the US

Or "former heights" if the reference is not too recent
Selected response from:

Travelin Ann
Local time: 20:17
Grading comment
Perfect, thank you.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +6former glory
jmleger
5 +2former luster/lustre
philgoddard
5return to the XXX economy of yore
Sara Freitas
3 +2bygone splendor
silvester55
4 +1former zenith
Barbara Cochran, MFA
5former prestige
Monica Rightenour
4glory days
Karen Vincent-Jones
4glory days
kashew
3heady heights
polyglot45
3Recover the sparle/lustre/shine
Oliver Toogood
3recent heights
Travelin Ann


Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


22 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
recent heights


Explanation:
something one hears/reads quite often in the US

Or "former heights" if the reference is not too recent


    Reference: http://www.greenspun.com/bboard/q-and-a-fetch-msg.tcl?msg_id...
Travelin Ann
Local time: 20:17
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Perfect, thank you.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Sara Freitas: definitely not "recent" (antan/before the 1990s)
3 hrs
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2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +6
former glory


Explanation:
for instance

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 20 mins (2011-03-07 14:37:18 GMT)
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I am sure The Economist lets a cliché slip by on occasion. Would be fun to open the latest edition and look for some... Chiche!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 24 mins (2011-03-07 14:41:51 GMT)
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Although he was an unloved prime minister in 1995-97, he earned sympathy for carrying the can for Mr Chirac, who himself faces trial in a linked corruption case next week.

Carrying the can in the current online edition of The Economist. Does that qualify as a cliché expression?

jmleger
Local time: 19:17
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 4
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks! This did cross my mind, but is it something you would read in, say, The Economist? Just a question!


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Alistair Ian Spearing Ortiz
2 mins

agree  Wendy Streitparth: Same thing came to mind instantly.
6 mins

neutral  Richard Nice: there's a problem, even if already present in the original: a former glory in decline is a tautology... (reply to reply: true, if you read the syntax that way...)
22 mins
  -> In decline since the beginning of the 90's, Japan is unlikely to recover soon it's former glory blah, blah.. what tautology? No tautology. None at all.

agree  silvester55
40 mins

disagree  Oliver Toogood: I agree with Richard, that it is unlikely to fit in the context here.//No,CMW, read the asker's own comments as well as the context.
42 mins

agree  cmwilliams (X): yes, appropriate in the context.
48 mins

agree  Wendy Cummings: "...unlikely to return to its former glory any time soon"
1 hr

agree  Bourth (X): I was going to say "the following part" needs to be made "the preceding part", but I see Asker has worked on that.
1 hr

neutral  philgoddard: I think "glory" is too strong a word - if it says lustre in French, you should say lustre in English.
1 hr
  -> This is such a worn-out cliché that you can't take glory to its full strength. In fact it's even ever so slightly ironical

neutral  cc in nyc: Sounds idiomatic, but I think the Asker is looking for something else. :-(
3 hrs
  -> I don't want to press the point, but the original sounds pretty idiomatic to me as well.

agree  Maria Licursi
6 hrs
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42 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
former luster/lustre


Explanation:
I don't see the point of trying to find near-synonyms when there's a perfectly good English equivalent.

philgoddard
United States
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 28

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Oliver Toogood: Talking of tautologies, here's another: near synonym.A word has an exact synonym, or it doesn't.Period.
11 mins
  -> I don't see how tautologies have anything to do with this, but glory is a near-synonym of lustre. Lustre shines; glory dazzles. Very few words are exact synonyms.

agree  kashew: Luster of the yen sounds perfect. Or go off into prestige...
36 mins
  -> Thanks!

agree  Helen Shiner: Nice and shiny and reminiscent of coins
1 hr
  -> Exactly - thank you.
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42 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Recover the sparle/lustre/shine


Explanation:
Le Japon ne pourra pas retrouver son lustre d'antan de sitôt, en déclin depuis le début des années 1990s
"Japan, in decline since the early 90's, will not be able to recover its former sparkle straight away"
"Antan" is most usually translated as "Yesteryear",(or Days of Yore) as in the repeated line "Mais où sont les neiges d'antan", in the poem by Francois Villon entitled "Ballade des Dames du temps jadis".

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 47 mins (2011-03-07 15:04:44 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Typo, sorry 'SparKle'

Oliver Toogood
United Kingdom
Local time: 01:17
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  silvester55: it's not about shining or sparkle , but glory
27 mins
  -> No comment

neutral  philgoddard: Silvester55: it IS about shining or sparkle.
47 mins
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48 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
lustre d\'antan
bygone splendor


Explanation:
Although I agree with JMLeger , but this is also a possibility

silvester55
Local time: 03:17
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Oliver Toogood: Did you read the asker's context beneath the question? Anyway, this isn't about ruined former palaces, castles, and stuff.//Exactly Phil! You didn't read the question asker's own context or comments.That's why it merits a disagree.!
8 mins

agree  philgoddard: Don't see how this merits a disagree, or why ruined castles have anything to do with this.
13 mins
  -> thks phil

agree  kashew: TOKYO (MarketWatch) -- Investors betting the yen's ***glory days*** against the dollar are over might want to prepare for an encore by the Japanese currency in the coming weeks. "
35 mins
  -> thks kashew

agree  Helen Shiner: Perfectly fitting and certainly not meriting a disagree (particularly from someone who has himself posted an answer).
1 hr
  -> very strong "disagree" comment from oliver , haha , thks Helen

neutral  cc in nyc: I would agree, except that the Asker has already discounted it for this context. :-(
2 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
heady heights


Explanation:
We are unlikely in the near future to see the return of the Japanese economy, in decline since xxx, to its former heady heights

polyglot45
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 15
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
glory days


Explanation:
TOKYO (MarketWatch) -- Investors betting the yen's glory days against the dollar are over might want to prepare for an encore by the Japanese currency in the coming weeks.

kashew
France
Local time: 02:17
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 16
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
lustre d\'antan
former prestige


Explanation:
Japan will not be able to find again the former prestige, being in decline since 1990.

Monica Rightenour
Local time: 20:17
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in RomanianRomanian
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
former zenith


Explanation:
HTH

Barbara Cochran, MFA
United States
Local time: 20:17
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Sara Freitas: I kinda like this one!
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Sara!
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
return to the XXX economy of yore


Explanation:
replace XX with happier/more prosperous/more dynamic/growth...is there not a concept mentioned elsewhere, like just before or just after this sentence in your source text) that you could pull in here to qualify "economy"? If you want to replace the abstract "lustre d'antan" with something more concrete that works better in English, in my opinion you need to take a more holistic approach to the text and not translate sentence-by-sentence (i.e. pull in a concept *not* specifically included in this sentence but that is referenced elesewhere in the text).

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Note added at 4 hrs (2011-03-07 18:24:50 GMT)
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Actually having a hard time seeing how to fit "former" anything into this sentence...since it does reference the pre-1990s period. How about simply saying something like "return to its pre-1990s zenith" to steal part of Barbara's answer, which I kind of like (zenith-lustre = light).

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Note added at 4 hrs (2011-03-07 18:28:00 GMT)
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"Le Japon ne pourra pas retrouver son lustre d'antan de sitôt, en déclin depuis le début des années 1990s"

It will be some time before Japan's economy climbs out of its downward spiral and returns to its pre-1990s zenith

It will be some time before Japan fully recovers from the downward spiral it has seen since its pre-1990s heyday

Sara Freitas
France
Local time: 02:17
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
glory days


Explanation:
I think this would work, and is less cliched than 'former glory'

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 hrs (2011-03-07 19:08:50 GMT)
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Whoops- sorry Kashew, didn't notice you'd got there first!

Example sentence(s):
  • Manchester's glory days as the epicentre of Brisish popular music ended when the Hacienda closed down.

    Reference: http://www.guardian.co.uk/stage/theatreblog/2011/feb/01/roya...
Karen Vincent-Jones
United Kingdom
Local time: 01:17
Works in field
Native speaker of: English
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