La Grande Ours

English translation: The Plough

03:19 Jun 16, 2006
French to English translations [Non-PRO]
Science - Astronomy & Space
French term or phrase: La Grande Ours
I had someone challenge me to find out what this term meant in French and then to find out how the French translate it back in English. I am wondering if it has some alternative meaning or slang of some sort. Any help you could give would be much appreciated. I am fairly competitive so I would love to win this one.
Thanks!!! Also, I think I spelt it right. It is supposed to mean large bear I believe.
Rhonda Williams
English translation:The Plough
Explanation:
The constellation Ursa Major is called the 'Plough' in UK English and the 'Big Dipper' in US English

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Note added at 3 hrs (2006-06-16 06:41:57 GMT)
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Of course, Attila has pointed out that the pattern of stars making up the Plough are not the ENTIRE 'Ursa Major' constellation; however, in everday French as well as in English, 'La Grande Ourse' usually refers to just those 7 stars with which most people are familiar.

So for all practical purposes, except to expert astronomers, the terms are everyday equivalents!
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 04:12
Grading comment
Thank you!! I just needed the basics in laymans everyday terms and that is what you gave me. Thanks a bunch.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +5Great Bear, Ursa Major.
Juan Jacob
5 +5La Grande Ourse = The Big Dipper
Jean-Claude Gouin
4 +4The Plough
Tony M


  

Answers


10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +5
Le Grande Ours
Great Bear, Ursa Major.


Explanation:
If astronomy. Not slang. Lack of context, also.
No, wrong spelling.
It's La Grande Ourse.
Luck.

Juan Jacob
Mexico
Local time: 21:12
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in FrenchFrench

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Attila Piróth: That's it. The Big Dipper/The Plough is just a cluster of seven stars in the constellation Ursa Major, four forming the bowl and three the handle of a dipper-shaped configuration. Also called Charles's Wain, Plow. http://www.answers.com/topic/big-dipper
2 hrs
  -> Thanks.

agree  David Goward
2 hrs
  -> Thanks.

agree  Kate Hudson
4 hrs
  -> Thanks.

agree  Alison Jenner
4 hrs
  -> Thanks.

agree  Peter Shortall
13 hrs
  -> Thanks.
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11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +5
Le Grande Ours
La Grande Ourse = The Big Dipper


Explanation:
An arrangement of stars in the Northern Hemisphere.

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Note added at 13 mins (2006-06-16 03:33:00 GMT)
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http://www.astropix.com/HTML/C_SPRING/URSAS.HTM



Jean-Claude Gouin
Canada
Local time: 22:12
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  sporran
19 mins
  -> Merci sporran ...

agree  Brigitte Albert (X)
37 mins
  -> Merci, Brigitte ...

agree  Tony M: It's 'The Big Dipper' in US English, but 'The Plough' in UK English // :-))
1 hr
  -> If you say so, Tony ... Here, in Canada, we sometimes don't know which English we're speaking!

neutral  Attila Piróth: From your reference: "The Big Dipper is an asterism that makes up part of the constellation of Ursa Major, The Big Bear." So the two (the Great/Big Bear and the Big Dipper) are not equivalent.
2 hrs
  -> Merci, Attila, pour votre contribution ...

agree  Kate Hudson
4 hrs
  -> Merci, Kate ...

agree  Peter Shortall
13 hrs
  -> Merci, Peter ...
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
La Grande Ourse
The Plough


Explanation:
The constellation Ursa Major is called the 'Plough' in UK English and the 'Big Dipper' in US English

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs (2006-06-16 06:41:57 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Of course, Attila has pointed out that the pattern of stars making up the Plough are not the ENTIRE 'Ursa Major' constellation; however, in everday French as well as in English, 'La Grande Ourse' usually refers to just those 7 stars with which most people are familiar.

So for all practical purposes, except to expert astronomers, the terms are everyday equivalents!

Tony M
France
Local time: 04:12
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Grading comment
Thank you!! I just needed the basics in laymans everyday terms and that is what you gave me. Thanks a bunch.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Attila Piróth: The Plough/Big Dipper is only a part of the Great/Big Bear, see http://www.answers.com/topic/big-dipper
1 hr
  -> Well, if you want to be pedantic, yes of course... but I think for the purposes of Asker's question, and in everyday layman's terms, the equivalence is OK

agree  Rachel Davenport
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Rachel!

agree  Kate Hudson
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, Kate!

agree  John Peterson
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, John!

agree  Peter Shortall: "Great Bear" may be technically more accurate, but I suspect few people know the rest of the constellation, besides the seven familiar stars, even exists (far too faint to be seen in our neon-infested streets - or mine, at least!)
11 hrs
  -> Thanks, Peter! Exactly! That's the way the people here use it, at any rate; I don't think there IS a separate word for what we call 'The Plough'
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