Oenometer - Vinometer

English translation: see comment

14:57 Nov 8, 2004
English language (monolingual) [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Wine / Oenology / Viticulture / Measuring instruments
English term or phrase: Oenometer - Vinometer
Is there any difference between the two words? What they exactly refer to? Do the work in the same way?
Thank you
Angelica Perrini
Local time: 18:14
Selected answer:see comment
Explanation:
oenometer : instrument for measuring alcoholic strength of wine

vinometer : An instrument for determining the strength or purity of wine by measuring its density.

They look like same.
Selected response from:

gulser (X)
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.
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SUMMARY OF ALL EXPLANATIONS PROVIDED
3 +4see comment
gulser (X)
5-
Natalie
4The situation is confused.
Richard Benham
4 -1different things
Mónica Belén Colacilli


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


19 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +4
oenometer - vinometer
see comment


Explanation:
oenometer : instrument for measuring alcoholic strength of wine

vinometer : An instrument for determining the strength or purity of wine by measuring its density.

They look like same.


    Reference: http://phrontistery.50megs.com/o.html
gulser (X)
Native speaker of: Native in TurkishTurkish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Richard Benham
14 mins
  -> thx

agree  Kathy Olszanowski
34 mins
  -> thanks

agree  Vladimir Dubisskiy
2 hrs
  -> thanks

agree  sonja29 (X)
21 hrs
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11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
oenometer - vinometer
different things


Explanation:
http://www.webster-dictionary.net/definition/OEnometer

Definition of OEnometer
OE`nom´e`ter
n. 1. See Alcoholometer.

Definition of Alcoholometer
Al`co`hol`om´e`ter
n. 1. (Chem.) An instrument for determining the strength of spirits, with a scale graduated so as to indicate the percentage of pure alcohol, either by weight or volume. It is usually a form of hydrometer with a special scale.

Look in this chart what are alcoholmeter and winemeter used for:
http://www.widdernet.de/instruments.html

Hope it helps!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 25 mins (2004-11-08 15:22:47 GMT)
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Sorry, I wrote winemeter instead of vinometer. Anyway, alcoholmeter and vinometer are different things. You can see it at the chart... and also winemeter, just in case ;-).

Mónica Belén Colacilli
Argentina
Local time: 13:14
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Natalie: Monica, vinometer, NOT winemeter!
7 mins
  -> you're right, sorry!!

disagree  Richard Benham: Your Webster's ref. says that an oenometer is "usually a form of hydrometer with a special scale", which is exactly what your other reference shows for a "vinometer"! Incidentally, I can't find an oenometer on the second ref, which is a bad translation!
21 mins
  -> The purpose of my Webster's reference was to show that oenometer and alcoholmeter are synonyms. In the chart you can find alcoholmeter and vinometer.
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26 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
oenometer - vinometer
-


Explanation:
Slightly different, but both used for measuling the percent of alcohol (oenometer in various liquids, vinometer in wine by measuring the density).

Oenometer = alcoholometer (used to determine the amount of alcohol in a LIQUID)

Vinometer = an instrument for determining the strength or purity of WINE by measuring its density
All about vinometers:
http://www.monashscientific.com.au/Vinometer.htm

What about the winemeter mentioned by Monica, it's an instrument for measuring in sugar liquid for winemaking (see the page cited by Monica)



Natalie
Poland
Local time: 18:14
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Richard Benham: The vinometer in your ref. works by measuring surface tension, not density. The one in Mónica's ref is depicted and described as a special kind of hydrometer--i.e. it measures density. So there is some confusion here.
13 mins
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
oenometer - vinometer
The situation is confused.


Explanation:
Webster's (referred to by Monica: http://www.webster-dictionary.net/definition/OEnometer) gives "oenometer" as a synonym of "alcoholometer" which it says is "usually" a hydrometer with a special scale.

I am afraid Monica's second reference (http://www.widdernet.de/instruments.html) is more or less totally useless. For one thing, it does not contain either an "alcoholometer" (but only an "alcoholmeter", occasionally spelt "alkoholmeter") or an "oenometer"; so comparison with the "vinometer" is impossible. In any case, all the instruments displayed are hydrometers with special scales. Worst of all, it is obviously translated from the German, and is a comically bad translation.

If there is anything to be learned from this reference, it is that a vinometer is a hydrometer with a special scale, just like the majority of oenometers (according to Webster). However, Natalie's "Monash Scientific" reference (http://www.monashscientific.com.au/Vinometer.htm) shows a "vinometer" which measures surface tension, not density. But, of course, there is nothing to stop an oenometer or alcoholometer working like this, even in Webster's, which only says this is how it "usually" works.

Possibly the Webster's reference to spirits is important. The presence of sugar in wine confuses the picture. Density can be a guide to alcoholic strength, but is less reliable. So possibly, just possibly, a "vinometer" measures the alcoholic strength (more or less accurately) of wine, and an "oenometer" is for testing spirits, regardless of the method used.

Richard Benham
France
Local time: 18:14
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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