broad

English translation: soft

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:broad
Selected answer:soft
Entered by: Mark Nathan

07:35 Feb 27, 2014
English language (monolingual) [PRO]
Wine / Oenology / Viticulture
English term or phrase: broad
Mouth feel _ firm, juicy and not too broad. A long finish, closes with aromas of chocolate and toasted spices
Bin Tiede
Germany
Local time: 15:57
soft
Explanation:
If a wine was too broad it would probably be lacking acidity, making it "flat".

In this context of a generally positive tasting note, I would avoid "flat" and say soft or rounded.

See exert below from Wine and Spirit Education Trust

http://www.wsetglobal.com/documents/cag_part_2_tasting_2013....
For most people acids are detected most strongly
at the sides of the tongue, where they cause
a
sharp, tingling sensation, and cause your mouth to
water, as it tries to restore its natural acid balance.
The more your mouth waters, and the lon
ger it
waters, the higher the level of acid in the wine.
Note that if you are dehydrated when tasting, your
mouth will water less. Wine is an acidic drink, so
even a wine described as having

low acidity

will
be acidic compared to many other beverages,
th
ough as a wine it will feel broad, round and soft.
High acidity tends to be found in wines made from
grapes ripened in cool conditions, and causes
these wines to be especially mouthwatering
Selected response from:

Mark Nathan
France
Local time: 15:57
Grading comment
Thank you!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



SUMMARY OF ALL EXPLANATIONS PROVIDED
3 +3soft
Mark Nathan
4full-bodied but lacking in finesse
Charles Davis
3full
acetran
Summary of reference entries provided
glossary
Lucy Phillips

  

Answers


8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
full


Explanation:
broad also means full. [Eg. We awoke to broad daylight.]
So, Mouth feel _ firm, juicy and not too full.

(Not very native; but we translators have to translate all kinds of text--native and non-native).

acetran
Native speaker of: Native in HindiHindi, Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Carol Gullidge: what we need here is what the word "broad" means in terms of wine speak! Unfortunately, 'broad' doesn't even get a mention in my wine dictionary, but the wording ('not too…') would suggest negative connotations, whereas fullness is a positive property
1 hr
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43 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
soft


Explanation:
If a wine was too broad it would probably be lacking acidity, making it "flat".

In this context of a generally positive tasting note, I would avoid "flat" and say soft or rounded.

See exert below from Wine and Spirit Education Trust

http://www.wsetglobal.com/documents/cag_part_2_tasting_2013....
For most people acids are detected most strongly
at the sides of the tongue, where they cause
a
sharp, tingling sensation, and cause your mouth to
water, as it tries to restore its natural acid balance.
The more your mouth waters, and the lon
ger it
waters, the higher the level of acid in the wine.
Note that if you are dehydrated when tasting, your
mouth will water less. Wine is an acidic drink, so
even a wine described as having

low acidity

will
be acidic compared to many other beverages,
th
ough as a wine it will feel broad, round and soft.
High acidity tends to be found in wines made from
grapes ripened in cool conditions, and causes
these wines to be especially mouthwatering

Mark Nathan
France
Local time: 15:57
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Thank you!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  P.L.F.Persio: full-bodied answer, Mark;-)
16 mins

agree  Yvonne Gallagher
58 mins

neutral  Carol Gullidge: it's funny but 'broad' doesn't even get a mention in Lexivin/Lexiwine. But in any case, the phrasing here (but not too broad) would suggest that broadness is not a good thing, as opposed to softness (souplesse, moelleux, etc), which is!
1 hr
  -> Hi Carol, yes I know what you mean. Although if you think of acidity, a little is desirable, but too much isn't..

agree  Charles Davis: I'm coming round to your view, Mark. This is about mouth feel, after all. Broad and soft in this context regularly go together; they're almost synonyms. Sort of bland in a negative sense. And softness may be good but you can have too much of a good thing!
3 hrs
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
full-bodied but lacking in finesse


Explanation:
It doesn't have to be a negative term, but here it seems to be, so the second half of my answer is probably relevant: not too broad would mean not too "simple" in flavour.

"Broad
Full-bodied but lacking in acidity and therefore also lacking in finesse."
http://www.bcawa.ca/winemaking/words.htm

"Let me start with “broad.” Generally, it will mean a full-bodied wine, not sharp or angular, and not light and delicate. Think “broad shoulders.” “Broad” can also mean that the flavors themselves are ample, obvious and straightforward, extending throughout the wine. If a wine is described as having “broad plum flavors,” then I’d expect that the plum flavor was the dominant note. It’s neither a positive nor a negative term, simply a personality trait."
http://www.winespectator.com/drvinny/show/id/43908

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Note added at 2 hrs (2014-02-27 09:44:19 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I think the sense is probably not too obvious or straightforward in flavour. It could include the idea of not being too soft, since broadness implies lack of acidity (as Mark has already said), but I think the main sense is being "too broad" is lacking in character and distinctiveness, so this wine is not like that: it has sufficient subtlety and delicacy.

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 15:57
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
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Reference comments


3 hrs
Reference: glossary

Reference information:
broad gets a mention here - sounds like it means pretty much what the word broad means in everyday speech:

http://www.wineanorak.com/glossary/glossary.htm

Lucy Phillips
United Kingdom
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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