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delivery

English translation: they both mean the same

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:delivery
Selected answer:they both mean the same

13:11 Feb 15, 2016
    The asker opted for community grading. The question was closed on 2016-02-19 08:54:11 based on peer agreement (or, if there were too few peer comments, asker preference.)


English language (monolingual) [PRO]
Bus/Financial - Transport / Transportation / Shipping
English term or phrase: delivery
Delivery is within UK only.
International shipping is not available at this point.

I think above two mean the same thing.
Which is more common?

Thanks!
Sue-my
Local time: 08:22
they both mean the same
Explanation:
See the discussion box.
Selected response from:

philgoddard
United States
Grading comment
Thank you very much!!
Your answer is very helpful.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



SUMMARY OF ALL EXPLANATIONS PROVIDED
4 +8they both mean the same
philgoddard
4 -2Delivery is "to your door"
Lubosh Hanuska


Discussion entries: 5





  

Answers


12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -2
Delivery is "to your door"


Explanation:
The meaning of "Delivery" is "to your door". An item can be delivered by a postman or a courier. When the term "shipping" is used it often implies a "cheaper" service, which does not necessary include delivery to your door, it might be a parcel service where you need to go and pickup from a depot. This varies from country to country, in Australia a lot of Post services now routinely have 24-hour pickup locations where you only get a card with a code in your letterbox and use that to open a locker to get your parcel...


    Reference: http://auspost.com.au/parcels-mail/parcel-lockers.html
Lubosh Hanuska
Australia
Local time: 01:22
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SlovakSlovak

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  philgoddard: I don't agree with this. They are synonyms.
5 mins

neutral  Armorel Young: Phil is right - they are actually saying "We only deliver in the UK, not internationally".
33 mins

disagree  Steffen Walter: With Phil and Armorel: the two terms are used synonymously/interchangeably in this case. / That's an artificial distinction in my opinion.
37 mins
  -> In this case they are. However, my answer was more about what the difference might be, if any. People can use them as synonyms but one is more suited to specific type of service than other. I'd use "shipping" for business and "delivery" for domestic post.

disagree  B D Finch: "Delivery" does not mean "to your door".
1 day 3 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

48 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +8
they both mean the same


Explanation:
See the discussion box.

philgoddard
United States
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thank you very much!!
Your answer is very helpful.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Steffen Walter
1 min

agree  Armorel Young: They do, although that is not to say that one is superfluous - they simply complement each other, or rather the second spells out the implications of the first.
52 mins

agree  acetran
1 hr

agree  Tina Vonhof
1 hr

agree  Charlesp
2 hrs

agree  Mikhail Korolev
13 hrs

agree  Jessica Burlacu
13 hrs

agree  Yasutomo Kanazawa
21 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



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