(for at-power internal events)

English translation: an internal event, on load

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:for at-power internal events
Selected answer:an internal event, on load
Entered by: Tony M

20:39 Aug 17, 2016
English language (monolingual) [PRO]
Science - Nuclear Eng/Sci
English term or phrase: (for at-power internal events)
The periodic safety reassessment issued every ten years for each unit include the probabilistic safety assessment results for internal at-power and shutdown events. For Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1, the third periodic safety reassessment was issued in November 2010. It reported a core damage frequency of 3.9 × 10 −8* per year and a containment failure frequency of 1.3 × 10 −8* per year. The core damage frequency for station blackout was 2.5 × 10 −9* per year (for at-power internal events), which was only 6% of the total risk and was a small fraction of the overall calculated risk of a core damage event. The containment failure frequency from station blackout was 1.5 × 10 −9*, or 12% of the total.

If this likelihood is related to station blackout, so what this parenthesis tries to tell us? For me at-power means when something is turend on such as when you turn on your TV!

More info:
Core is one of the main components of a reactor containing fuel.
Containment is one of the main vessels of a reactor.
Station blackout means the plant's AC power is lost.
Internal event such as fire (in contrast with external event such as tsuanmi)
Those numbers with * are exponents. For e.g. 3.9 × 10 −8* means ten to the exponent of negative -8
Masoud Kakoli
Iran
Local time: 11:22
an internal event, on load, and in the event of station blackout
Explanation:
'at power' here doesn't quite mean 'turned on' (in the 'powered-up' kind of sense you seem to understand), but rather 'when generating power' — i.e. 'operating', as distinct from 'shut down' — didn't you ask a question about 'at-power' before, which I seem to remember was answered pretty fully?

So they are talking about the probability of internal events occurring (during operation) in the event of a station blackout; it seems that in this paragraph at least, they are ignoring the (presumably less dangerous!) possibility of an internal event during shutdown — but in either case, as a result of / associated with a station blackout.

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Note added at 11 minutes (2016-08-17 20:51:30 GMT)
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I think the brackets are just there to make the long list of qualifiers clearer.

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Note added at 26 minutes (2016-08-17 21:06:33 GMT)
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I think you'll find that in this specific context, 'at power' means when the reactor is generating (wanted) heat — i.e. the opposite of 'shut down'; however, under normal circumstances, this would of course ALSO mean when it is generating (electrical) power.

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Note added at 27 minutes (2016-08-17 21:07:04 GMT)
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There you go :-)
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 08:52
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



SUMMARY OF ALL EXPLANATIONS PROVIDED
3 +8an internal event, on load, and in the event of station blackout
Tony M


  

Answers


10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +8
an internal event, on load, and in the event of station blackout


Explanation:
'at power' here doesn't quite mean 'turned on' (in the 'powered-up' kind of sense you seem to understand), but rather 'when generating power' — i.e. 'operating', as distinct from 'shut down' — didn't you ask a question about 'at-power' before, which I seem to remember was answered pretty fully?

So they are talking about the probability of internal events occurring (during operation) in the event of a station blackout; it seems that in this paragraph at least, they are ignoring the (presumably less dangerous!) possibility of an internal event during shutdown — but in either case, as a result of / associated with a station blackout.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 11 minutes (2016-08-17 20:51:30 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I think the brackets are just there to make the long list of qualifiers clearer.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 26 minutes (2016-08-17 21:06:33 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I think you'll find that in this specific context, 'at power' means when the reactor is generating (wanted) heat — i.e. the opposite of 'shut down'; however, under normal circumstances, this would of course ALSO mean when it is generating (electrical) power.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 27 minutes (2016-08-17 21:07:04 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

There you go :-)

Tony M
France
Local time: 08:52
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 36
Notes to answerer
Asker: Yes, you are right! My question was "at power". I guessed that it can refer to operating when I had just posted this question!

Asker: "time at power"


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Yvonne Gallagher: same questions being asked. http://www.proz.com/kudoz/English/nuclear_eng_sci/6144836-ti...
1 hr
  -> Thanks, G!

agree  Jörgen Slet
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Jörgen!

agree  Pieter B: At Power is one of the operating modes of a nuclear power plant. It means 100% nominal power output. For more information, take a look at following link: http://www.nuclearelectricalengineer.com/nuclear-power-plant...
7 hrs
  -> Thanks, Pieter!

agree  Yasutomo Kanazawa
8 hrs
  -> Thanks, Yasutomo-san!

agree  Terry Richards
8 hrs
  -> Thanks, Terry!

agree  Didier Fourcot: At power: operating at nominal conditions; the funny thing is the probablity in the 10-8 - 10-9 range now that we know that 3 events did occur almost simultaneously in less than 30 years of operation
12 hrs
  -> Thanks, Didier! yes, that's the whole trouble with theoretical probabilities, isn't it?

agree  acetran
19 hrs
  -> Thanks, Ace!

agree  Phong Le
1 day 18 hrs
  -> Thanks, Phong Le!
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