10-18 steel

English translation: plain carbon steel containing 0.18 wt% carbon

07:28 Oct 9, 2007
English language (monolingual) [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Metallurgy / Casting / steel types
English term or phrase: 10-18 steel
what do the numbers signify?
(context: "The frame is built from 10-18 steel...")
Pike
Croatia
Local time: 02:50
Selected answer:plain carbon steel containing 0.18 wt% carbon
Explanation:
Assuming that the numbers are in the right order, this isn't stainless steel but tooling steel. There is more than one agency that grades steel. See the references below. You can find more information by following the links within the references :-)

Carbon Steel and Low Alloy Steel
Carbon steels and low alloy steels are designated by a four digit number, where the first two digits indicate the alloying elements and the last two digits indicate the amount of carbon, in hundreths of a percent by weight. For example, a 1060 steel is a plain carbon steel containing 0.60 wt% C.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AISI_steel_grades

The Unified Numbering System (UNS) is an alloy designation system widely accepted in North America. It consists of a prefix letter and five digits. A prefix of S indicates steel alloys, C for copper, brass, or bronze alloys, T for tool steels, etc. The first three digits often match older three-digit numbering systems, while the last two digits indicate more modern variations. For example, Copper Alloy No. 377 (forging brass) in the original three-digit system became C37700 in the UNS System. The UNS is managed jointly by the American Society for Testing and Materials and the Society of Automotive Engineers.
Steel Grades
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steel_grades
Some common materials and translations to other standards:
• UNS K11547 is T2 tool steel
• UNS S17400 is ASTM grade 630, Cr-Ni 17-4PH precipitation hardening stainless steel
• UNS S30400 is AISI 304, Cr/Ni 18/10, Euronorm 1.4301 stainless steel
• UNS S31600 is AISI 316
• UNS S31603 is 316L, a low carbon version of 316
• UNS C95400 is equivalent to Ampco 18 aluminum bronze[1]
The table below indicates the general categories
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unified_numbering_system

Stainless steels are also classified by their crystalline structure:
• Austenitic, or 300 series, stainless steels comprise over 70% of total stainless steel production. **They contain a maximum of 0.15% carbon,** a minimum of 16% chromium and sufficient nickel and/or manganese to retain an austenitic structure at all temperatures from the cryogenic region to the melting point of the alloy. **A typical composition of 18% chromium and 10% nickel, commonly known as 18/10 stainless is often used in flatware.** Similarly 18/0 and 18/8 is also available. “Superaustenitic” stainless steels, such as alloy AL-6XN and 254SMO, exhibit great resistance to chloride pitting and crevice corrosion due to high Molybdenum contents (>6%) and nitrogen additions and the higher nickel content ensures better resistance to stress-corrosion cracking over the 300 series. The higher alloy content of "Superaustenitic" steels makes them more expensive. Other steels can offer similar performance at lower cost and are preferred in certain applications
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/18/10

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Note added at 9 hrs (2007-10-09 16:57:36 GMT) Post-grading
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You're welcome, Pike, & thank you! :-)
Selected response from:

Claire Chapman
Local time: 20:50
Grading comment
Many thanks indeed, wish they allowed awarding 12 pts for "answers above and beyond the call of duty" ;D
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



SUMMARY OF ALL EXPLANATIONS PROVIDED
3 +5A certain form of alloy steel
Jack Doughty
4plain carbon steel containing 0.18 wt% carbon
Claire Chapman


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +5
A certain form of alloy steel


Explanation:
I wondered at first if it was steel bars of 10mm x 18 mm cross section, but no, apparently it is a grade of alloy steel. But I haven't been able to find out exactly what it consists of.

http://www.paintcenter.org/rj/jul03j.cfm

Jack Doughty
United Kingdom
Local time: 01:50
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 8
Notes to answerer
Asker: thanks a lot, it was helpful, but Ms Claire really solved it all for me this time.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  writeaway: I am familiar with 10/18 as a quality of stainless steel. had no idea it was used for construction-quality steel too./haha-see I got the numbers wrong (as usual)
19 mins
  -> Thank you.

agree  JohnGBell: 10-18 appers to be a structural steel, not to be confused with 18/10 which is a stainless steel
32 mins
  -> Thank you.

agree  Monika Silea: steel of 10/18 grade (just as 24 Karat gold...)
34 mins
  -> Thank you.

agree  Marina Lara Petersen
4 hrs
  -> Thank you.

agree  CHEN-Ling
7 hrs
  -> Thank you.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

8 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
plain carbon steel containing 0.18 wt% carbon


Explanation:
Assuming that the numbers are in the right order, this isn't stainless steel but tooling steel. There is more than one agency that grades steel. See the references below. You can find more information by following the links within the references :-)

Carbon Steel and Low Alloy Steel
Carbon steels and low alloy steels are designated by a four digit number, where the first two digits indicate the alloying elements and the last two digits indicate the amount of carbon, in hundreths of a percent by weight. For example, a 1060 steel is a plain carbon steel containing 0.60 wt% C.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AISI_steel_grades

The Unified Numbering System (UNS) is an alloy designation system widely accepted in North America. It consists of a prefix letter and five digits. A prefix of S indicates steel alloys, C for copper, brass, or bronze alloys, T for tool steels, etc. The first three digits often match older three-digit numbering systems, while the last two digits indicate more modern variations. For example, Copper Alloy No. 377 (forging brass) in the original three-digit system became C37700 in the UNS System. The UNS is managed jointly by the American Society for Testing and Materials and the Society of Automotive Engineers.
Steel Grades
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steel_grades
Some common materials and translations to other standards:
• UNS K11547 is T2 tool steel
• UNS S17400 is ASTM grade 630, Cr-Ni 17-4PH precipitation hardening stainless steel
• UNS S30400 is AISI 304, Cr/Ni 18/10, Euronorm 1.4301 stainless steel
• UNS S31600 is AISI 316
• UNS S31603 is 316L, a low carbon version of 316
• UNS C95400 is equivalent to Ampco 18 aluminum bronze[1]
The table below indicates the general categories
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unified_numbering_system

Stainless steels are also classified by their crystalline structure:
• Austenitic, or 300 series, stainless steels comprise over 70% of total stainless steel production. **They contain a maximum of 0.15% carbon,** a minimum of 16% chromium and sufficient nickel and/or manganese to retain an austenitic structure at all temperatures from the cryogenic region to the melting point of the alloy. **A typical composition of 18% chromium and 10% nickel, commonly known as 18/10 stainless is often used in flatware.** Similarly 18/0 and 18/8 is also available. “Superaustenitic” stainless steels, such as alloy AL-6XN and 254SMO, exhibit great resistance to chloride pitting and crevice corrosion due to high Molybdenum contents (>6%) and nitrogen additions and the higher nickel content ensures better resistance to stress-corrosion cracking over the 300 series. The higher alloy content of "Superaustenitic" steels makes them more expensive. Other steels can offer similar performance at lower cost and are preferred in certain applications
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/18/10

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 9 hrs (2007-10-09 16:57:36 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

You're welcome, Pike, & thank you! :-)

Claire Chapman
Local time: 20:50
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Many thanks indeed, wish they allowed awarding 12 pts for "answers above and beyond the call of duty" ;D
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



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