hereinafter \"CONTRACTOR\"

11:05 Jan 25, 2016
This question was closed without grading. Reason: No acceptable answer

English language (monolingual) [PRO]
Law/Patents - Law: Contract(s)
English term or phrase: hereinafter \"CONTRACTOR\"
In contracts, it is normal to give the parties a kind of nickname that will be used to refer to them throughout the contract. For example: "Second party: ABC Ltda., hereinafter "CONTRACTOR"..."

What I would like to know is whether this nickname in legal documents has a technical name, such as "alias", so that it would make sense to write "The [alias?] for ABC Ltda. in the service contract is CONTRACTOR".

With thanks in advance...
Martin Riordan
Brazil
Local time: 12:09


SUMMARY OF ALL EXPLANATIONS PROVIDED
3 +7hereinafter referred to as
Edith Kelly
3 +3titled/referred to as
B D Finch
3designation
Mikhail Korolev


Discussion entries: 17





  

Answers


23 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +7
hereinafter \\\"contractor\\\"
hereinafter referred to as


Explanation:
this is standard procedure, it's usually not a nickname just to avoid having to repeat the whole name throughout the contract. I've given the longer version as an answer

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Note added at 24 mins (2016-01-25 11:30:31 GMT)
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e.g. ENCYCLOPAEDIA OF INTERNATIONAL AVIATION LAW
https://books.google.de/books?isbn=1466960698 -
PHILIP FORSANG NDIKUM - 2013 - ‎Transportation
... (hereinafter reffered to as “the Parties) shall be hereinafter reffered to as “the Shareholders”). WHEREAS 1. The Shareholdres have agreed to submit a tender ..

Edith Kelly
Switzerland
Local time: 17:09
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 11
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thank you for the contribution, Edith. I know there are several ways of expressing this. American contracts seem to prefer the shorter version that I gave. However, what I asked for is the technical term for this "nickname", if one exists.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Yvonne Gallagher
29 mins

agree  Yasutomo Kanazawa
37 mins

agree  writeaway: hereinafter = from now on (in this document)
1 hr

neutral  BrigitteHilgner: This does not answer the question.
1 hr

agree  acetran
2 hrs

neutral  philgoddard: Agree with Brigitte.
2 hrs

agree  Margarida Martins Costelha
3 hrs

agree  Alok Tiwari
1 day 2 hrs

agree  Phong Le
26 days
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25 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
hereinafter \"contractor\"
titled/referred to as


Explanation:
What you call a "nickname" is actually the title of that party's role under the contract. So, rather than writing "The [alias?] for ABC Ltda. in the service contract is CONTRACTOR," I'd write: ABC Ltda is titled "The Contractor" in the service contract, or ABC Ltda is referred to as "The Contractor" in the service contract.

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Note added at 4 hrs (2016-01-25 15:40:02 GMT)
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To Asker
In response to your Note, I don't think it is correct and I don't think there is a technical generic term. I also don't understand why you need one. Yes it would be necessary if you wanted to say "'CONTRACTOR' is the XXXX of ABC Ltda. in the service contract." But, why not put it the other way round, as I suggested above?

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Note added at 4 hrs (2016-01-25 15:42:23 GMT)
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I didn't include any "hereinbelow", because I assumed you might be using this in a document other than the service contract itself.

B D Finch
France
Local time: 17:09
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 28
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thank you Barbara. So is it correct to say that "'CONTRACTOR' is the title of ABC Ltda. in the service contract."? You see, what I am looking for, if it exists, is the technical generic term for the use of an alias in the contract for the various parties. I have never come across a technical term for this and, if there is one, I would like to know it.

Asker: It's a bit like climbing Mount Everest! I don't have an immediate need for this term, but got curious about whether it exists and, if so, what it is. And where better than KudoZ to find out? By all accounts, there is not a specific term. But I think the suggestion of "designation" (ex. "CONTRACTOR is the designation herein of ABC Ltda.") comes pretty close to what I wanted. And who knows what else may turn up?


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Yvonne Gallagher
27 mins
  -> Thanks Gallagy

agree  Adrian Liszewski: My version: "The ABC Ltda within the service contract is referred to as the CONTRACTOR"
35 mins
  -> Thanks Adrian. That isn't quite right: problem with your word order and use of definite article.

agree  Tina Vonhof: I would prefer 'is referred to as'.
6 hrs
  -> Thanks Tina. Me too.
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
hereinafter \"contractor\"
designation


Explanation:
http://legal-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/Parties

In court proceedings, the parties have common designations. In a civil lawsuit, the person who files the lawsuit is called the plaintiff, and the person being sued is called the defendant.

Mikhail Korolev
Local time: 18:09
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
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