sex-specific denominator estimates

English translation: estimates about the characteristics of the general population, broken down by gender

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English term or phrase:sex-specific denominator estimates
Selected answer:estimates about the characteristics of the general population, broken down by gender
Entered by: Nadia Ayoub

23:13 Apr 25, 2010
English language (monolingual) [PRO]
Social Sciences - International Org/Dev/Coop
English term or phrase: sex-specific denominator estimates
Gender-sensitive programming. Women who inject drugs often face additional stigma and/or barriers to access services. Proposals should address the particular needs of women who inject drugs and the female partners of men who inject drugs. Countries should also collect sex-disaggregated data and use these data, along with sex-specific denominator estimates, to monitor service issues and gaps.
Nadia Ayoub
Egypt
Local time: 17:32
estimates about the characteristics of the general population, broken down by gender
Explanation:
In epidemiological studies, the denominator is the general population under study (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Denominator_data).

For example, if you have statistics on industrial injuries, broken down by age, occupation, etc. (the numerator), these figures are only meaningful as statistics if you also have data on the total working population, also broken down by age, occupation, etc. (the denominator). Then you can determine which age groups, occupations, etc. are most at risk. So what data you use for the denominator will be an important issue (http://atlantic.aspc.gc.ca/publicat/cdic-mcc/17-3/a_e.html).

In your example, the numerator is presumably statistics on women who inject drugs or are partners of men who inject drugs. To make these statistics meaningful, you need parallel information about the general population, broken down by gender. For example, if you know the income distribution of women who inject drugs, you will then need an estimate of the income distribution of women in general to determine whether drug use is more prevalent among women in a given income group.


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Note added at 3 hrs (2010-04-26 02:48:50 GMT)
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Sorry, I see my links don't work because I enclosed them in brackets. Here they are again:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Denominator_data
http://atlantic.aspc.gc.ca/publicat/cdic-mcc/17-3/a_e.html
Selected response from:

John Detre
Canada
Grading comment
Many thanks John!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



SUMMARY OF ALL EXPLANATIONS PROVIDED
4 +4estimates about the characteristics of the general population, broken down by gender
John Detre


  

Answers


2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
estimates about the characteristics of the general population, broken down by gender


Explanation:
In epidemiological studies, the denominator is the general population under study (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Denominator_data).

For example, if you have statistics on industrial injuries, broken down by age, occupation, etc. (the numerator), these figures are only meaningful as statistics if you also have data on the total working population, also broken down by age, occupation, etc. (the denominator). Then you can determine which age groups, occupations, etc. are most at risk. So what data you use for the denominator will be an important issue (http://atlantic.aspc.gc.ca/publicat/cdic-mcc/17-3/a_e.html).

In your example, the numerator is presumably statistics on women who inject drugs or are partners of men who inject drugs. To make these statistics meaningful, you need parallel information about the general population, broken down by gender. For example, if you know the income distribution of women who inject drugs, you will then need an estimate of the income distribution of women in general to determine whether drug use is more prevalent among women in a given income group.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs (2010-04-26 02:48:50 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Sorry, I see my links don't work because I enclosed them in brackets. Here they are again:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Denominator_data
http://atlantic.aspc.gc.ca/publicat/cdic-mcc/17-3/a_e.html

John Detre
Canada
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Many thanks John!
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thank you John, that is very helpful!


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  David Hollywood
31 mins
  -> Thanks David

agree  Goldcoaster
6 hrs
  -> Thanks Goldcoaster

agree  Jenni Lukac (X)
9 hrs
  -> Thanks Jenni

agree  Ildiko Santana
12 hrs
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