attached

English translation: Do I carry a predisposition...

15:03 Apr 11, 2009
English language (monolingual) [PRO]
Medical - Genetics
English term or phrase: attached
Hi

I'm currently working on a paper on genetic counselling which has been written in English and needs careful proofreading.
I came across a question which sounds awkward to me, so I'd really love to know if the word "attached" is the right verb to be used here:

"Am I attached to my family diseases?"

This is an extract of a set of questions patients usually ask during genetic counselling sessions.

Thanks
Daisymiller
Local time: 10:23
Selected answer:Do I carry a predisposition...
Explanation:
It would be good to know the language of the original text. It is most probably:

Do I carry a predisposition to diseases that run in my family?


Provide the original if you can, please
Selected response from:

Lirka
Local time: 11:23
Grading comment
thanks:)
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



SUMMARY OF ALL EXPLANATIONS PROVIDED
5I am susceptible to inherent family diseases.
Gary D
4 +1Do I carry a predisposition...
Lirka
3 +1Am i a carrier?
K. Ganly (X)
4not a good choice
David Russi
4Am I at risk for feveloping a certian disease(s) in light of my family history
Shai Navé
3have I inherited?
B D Finch
4 -1attached
Mirra_


Discussion entries: 7





  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
not a good choice


Explanation:
Attached is not a good choice here, perhaps it is meant to ask whether family diseases can affect the person. I am sure there are many better ways of putting it, here is one:

Can my family's diseases affect me?


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 6 mins (2009-04-11 15:10:22 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

If it refers to the genetic potential to acquire some disease, maybe something along these lines could be appropriate:

Do I carry my family's (genetic) disease?

David Russi
United States
Local time: 03:23
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Lirka: basically, yes, but the term is "predisposition"
13 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

15 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Am I at risk for feveloping a certian disease(s) in light of my family history


Explanation:
I think that this is the meaning of te question. Is a person is in higher risk to develop something according to the disease history in the family - due to genetic heredity.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 15 mins (2009-04-11 15:19:25 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I meant of course developing and not feveloping

Shai Navé
Israel
Local time: 12:23
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in HebrewHebrew, Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Lirka: "of developing"; "given" my family hx; YES, but the medical-genetic term is "predisposition"; Hag sameach!
2 mins

neutral  B D Finch: We are nearly all at risk of developing most diseases - the risk might be tiny but still present. So it is not the presence of a risk, but it's magnitude that is in question.
12 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

16 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Do I carry a predisposition...


Explanation:
It would be good to know the language of the original text. It is most probably:

Do I carry a predisposition to diseases that run in my family?


Provide the original if you can, please


Lirka
Local time: 11:23
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 6
Grading comment
thanks:)

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  B D Finch: That's good, though I'm not sure whether it would be a sufficiently everyday term to be used by the layperson patient.
8 mins
  -> Thanks for your input!

agree  Michal Berski: Am I predisposed to..?
2 hrs
  -> Yes, thanks for your input.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

20 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
have I inherited?


Explanation:
Assuming that we are not talking about developing a fondness for the disease in question.

B D Finch
France
Local time: 11:23
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

58 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Am i a carrier?


Explanation:
Just a suggestion- i have to say it is quite unclear from the language used, but thought i would add my 2 cents...

Are they asking if they are 'carriers' of a particular mutation or gene? One can carry a mutated gene without being affected by the disease itself if the gene is not dominant. This would be different than having a 'predisposition' towards certain illnesses.
Being a carrier only becomes an issue when considering offspring- when the other parent carries the gene as well then the offspring has significantly increased chances of developing the disease/mutation.
Maybe by 'attached' they mean do they carry the gene (i.e. is it attached to them)

Just an idea!

K. Ganly (X)
United Kingdom
Local time: 10:23
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Lirka: the English of the authors is vague enough to allow for this option as well; though one needs to understand that being a carrier of a disease and having a predisposition are two different things!!
1 hr
  -> Thanks. Yes- i was trying to offer a different option as could mean many things from context- indeed carrier and predisposition completely different.

neutral  Michal Berski: not in the context of cancer//Indeed, thet woyld be too sophisticated; moreover, the question refers to the disease, not a mutation
2 hrs
  -> True for most but not all cancers-certain gene mutations that are inherited increase risk of specific cancers(namely FAP and MAP).Parent(s) with the gene are called carriers.Obviously this is quite specific though, so could not be used for broader scope!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

28 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
attached


Explanation:
yes, I think it is OK

anyway I am not a native English speaker
BUT
I can read and understand it... ;)

So, since the context is 'counselling', I guess that 'attach' is exactly the word you should use if you mean that one can develop a sort of *attachment* to family diseases. The poin - I guess - is that these diseases can be felt like a symbol of belonging, a stigma of one's kin.

For instance, I guess that this is possible for some body anomalies like extra fingers (polydactyly).
But I wouldn't be surprised to discover that even hereditary diseases can be viewed as a stigma of belonging and, in a certain way, of affection.
Is it possible that your questionnaire explores this side of the personal attitude towards hereditary diseases?
If you think so, in my opinion 'attach' is perfect :)

see some examples about its use
http://www.google.it/search?hl=it&safe=off&num=30&q="attache...

and please read the answers to this question
http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=974390



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 30 mins (2009-04-11 15:34:06 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

ah no,
sorry, I read your rfc!

It does not seem it has nothing to do with "psychological attachment" :))

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2009-04-11 16:09:54 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

so... if you are sure it is not dealing with growing a fond for the disease, I would say

"am I carrying a hereditary/genetic/familial disease?"

BUT

considering the context it would be far better to say

"am I carrying the same hereditary disease?"
http://www.google.it/search?hl=it&safe=off&num=30&q="carryin...

Mirra_
Italy
Local time: 11:23
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Lirka: Sorry, I do not think so at all!
1 hr
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
I am susceptible to inherent family diseases.


Explanation:
I am susceptible to inherent family diseases.

Gary D
Local time: 19:23
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs (or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.

KudoZ™ translation help

The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.


See also:

Your current localization setting

English

Select a language

Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search