Anglo-Saxon System

English translation: Imperial system/Imperial Units

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:Anglo-Saxon System
Selected answer:Imperial system/Imperial Units
Entered by: humbird

18:27 May 22, 2008
English language (monolingual) [PRO]
Art/Literary - General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters
English term or phrase: Anglo-Saxon System
Now I think I know what it is -- so-called "Imperial System (of measurement)".
I came across this word when translating a text written by a Scandinavian person (I have every reason to believe so).
So here's my question, since I've never heard this before.
1) Is my understanding correct?
2) What area(s) of Europe this expression is used.

TIA
humbird
Imperial system/Imperial Units
Explanation:
To be honest, I'm not sure I understand the question.

However, here's a detailed analysis of the imperial system from Wikipedia:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imperial_unit

mperial units or the Imperial system is a collection of units, first defined in the British Weights and Measures Act of 1824, later refined (until 1959) and reduced. The units were introduced in the United Kingdom and its colonies, including Commonwealth countries (most have since become officially metric, but continue to use both Metric and Imperial), but excluding the then already independent United States. Systems of imperial units are sometimes referred to as foot-pound-second, after the base units of length, mass and time. The Imperial System is becoming more and more obsolete. It is only officially used in three countries.

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Note added at 1 hr (2008-05-22 19:51:39 GMT)
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For further details, please visit http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imperial_unit

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Note added at 12 hrs (2008-05-23 06:49:17 GMT)
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OK, now I understand your question.

As Jack said, there's no "Anglo-Saxon" system of measurements. However, in some countries (such as the country where I come from, i.e. Greece) the Imperial system of measurements would be referred to as "the Anglo-Saxon System." So, I guess that this is what happened here as well, with your Scandinavian.
Selected response from:

d_vachliot (X)
Local time: 10:09
Grading comment
Thank you for your answer and additional note.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



SUMMARY OF ALL EXPLANATIONS PROVIDED
3 +5Imperial system/Imperial Units
d_vachliot (X)


Discussion entries: 7





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +5
anglo-saxon system
Imperial system/Imperial Units


Explanation:
To be honest, I'm not sure I understand the question.

However, here's a detailed analysis of the imperial system from Wikipedia:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imperial_unit

mperial units or the Imperial system is a collection of units, first defined in the British Weights and Measures Act of 1824, later refined (until 1959) and reduced. The units were introduced in the United Kingdom and its colonies, including Commonwealth countries (most have since become officially metric, but continue to use both Metric and Imperial), but excluding the then already independent United States. Systems of imperial units are sometimes referred to as foot-pound-second, after the base units of length, mass and time. The Imperial System is becoming more and more obsolete. It is only officially used in three countries.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2008-05-22 19:51:39 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

For further details, please visit http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imperial_unit

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 12 hrs (2008-05-23 06:49:17 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

OK, now I understand your question.

As Jack said, there's no "Anglo-Saxon" system of measurements. However, in some countries (such as the country where I come from, i.e. Greece) the Imperial system of measurements would be referred to as "the Anglo-Saxon System." So, I guess that this is what happened here as well, with your Scandinavian.

d_vachliot (X)
Local time: 10:09
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in GreekGreek
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thank you for your answer and additional note.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  BrettMN: I'm not sure I understand the question either, but "Anglo-Saxon system" is definitely NOT used to describe a system of measurement. This is it, instead. Where is "imperial system" used? Sometimes in the UK side by side with metric, always in the US.
1 hr
  -> Thank you.

agree  Kim Metzger: Imperial units works for the US, too. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_customary_units
4 hrs
  -> Thank you.

agree  Michael Barnett: But remember that the imperial gallon is bigger (~1.2x) than the US gallon.
5 hrs
  -> Thank you.

agree  Gary D: with more information it is Imperial. funny I thought a imperial gallon was 4.5 ltrs and a US gallon was 4.9ltrs But I haven't checked lately.
6 hrs
  -> Thank you.

agree  Jack Doughty
6 hrs
  -> Thank you.
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