Tinned tongue

English translation: tinned ox tongue

11:24 Apr 17, 2019
English language (monolingual) [Non-PRO]
Food & Drink / Circa 1900
English term or phrase: Tinned tongue
From Hound of the Baskervilles: "It contained a loaf of bread, a tinned tongue, and two tins of preserved peaches."

In England circa 1900, is "tinned tongue" most likely to be ox tongue, or is it simply impossible to determine with any degree of certainty?
Lincoln Hui
Hong Kong
Local time: 12:22
Selected answer:tinned ox tongue
Explanation:
Traditionally, in the UK, ox tongue is the most usual type used in this kind of product; so much so, that the word 'ox' is usually omitted; only if it were some other kind of tongue would it usually be specifically stated.

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Note added at 1 day 3 hrs (2019-04-18 14:53:32 GMT)
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Here in France, calf's tongue is commonly used; sheep's and pig's seem less common.

But as Charles points out, the only type of tongue I've ever seen or heard of being preserved is ox.

Within living memory (1960s), my neighbour was still ploughing with oxen — but referred to them as 'vaches'.
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 06:22
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



SUMMARY OF ALL EXPLANATIONS PROVIDED
4 +6tinned ox tongue
Tony M
4ox tinned tongue
Andrea Pilenso


Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


16 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
tinned tongue
ox tinned tongue


Explanation:
http://www.tommyspackfillers.com/ration-sub.asp?SubCat=1&Pag...

I found this reference about World War One Canned Meat labels, and most of them are ox tinned tongues. The article shows Australian sheep's tongues and New Zealand canned sheep tongues, but in England it appears to be always ox canned / tinned tongues.

Andrea Pilenso
Brazil
Local time: 01:22
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: Thanks for confirming my answer, though your suggested word order would not be correct in EN.
1 min
  -> Thanks for the remark, you are right!

neutral  writeaway: your posting probably overlapped with the other answer. it's not a confirmation in any case because the word order doesn't play in English
1 day 25 mins
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13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +6
tinned tongue
tinned ox tongue


Explanation:
Traditionally, in the UK, ox tongue is the most usual type used in this kind of product; so much so, that the word 'ox' is usually omitted; only if it were some other kind of tongue would it usually be specifically stated.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 day 3 hrs (2019-04-18 14:53:32 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Here in France, calf's tongue is commonly used; sheep's and pig's seem less common.

But as Charles points out, the only type of tongue I've ever seen or heard of being preserved is ox.

Within living memory (1960s), my neighbour was still ploughing with oxen — but referred to them as 'vaches'.

Tony M
France
Local time: 06:22
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 24

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Sina Salehi
4 mins
  -> Thanks, Sina!

agree  philgoddard
13 mins
  -> Thanks, Phil!

agree  kmtext
1 hr
  -> Thanks, KMT!

agree  Charles Davis: Caveat posted in discussion area (just in case). // Absolutely. I just thought that some people might not be aware of that.
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Charles! In culinary terms, ox just means beef, and beef just means 'bovine meat' — there is not the same zoological distinction made.

agree  katsy
23 hrs
  -> Thanks, Katsy!

agree  writeaway: oeuf corse. Asker just wanted reassurance that it was ox tongue.
1 day 1 hr
  -> Thanks, W/A! Yes, I feel sure that's all...
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