difference between countline and table

English translation: Origin of term: countline sold by count/number/unit v tablet sold by weight

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:difference between countline and tablet
Selected answer:Origin of term: countline sold by count/number/unit v tablet sold by weight
Entered by: Peter Simon

10:03 Oct 13, 2017
English language (monolingual) [PRO]
Bus/Financial - Food & Drink / snack, sweets
English term or phrase: difference between countline and table
Dear Colleagues,

I'm not sure I can ask such a question here, but I have nowhere else to ask. I'm stuck on this difference. My text, from a large international snack producer, is a hectic one, not much about one subject before jumping to another, but this is the text in the chocolate production context and starting with a particular brand in perspective for the US market.

"... there is a monthly call with the planning team in the US. They remain confident. The market is very different; it is more a countline than a tablet business. XXX shared that we see what is working and we are starting to adapt our plans. The business is growing and we are now starting to build our plans for 2018 so we will get a better picture on the volumes."

The client the text comes from provided me with a description (through the agency) of what they mean by countline (which I had already known) as follows: "By "countlines" they mean chocolate bars or tablets packed and sold in a pack, as opposed to sold as single items."

I may be a bit slow on the uptake, but I've been struggling for 2 days to understand why they call a difference between selling chocolate bars in a pack "very different" from selling them as single items, when in the case of chocolate bars/tablets, packaging is always there, though not in packs of 10. I haven't ever seen chocolate bars/tablets in packs of, say, 10 on a shop shelf. Before I can understand the huge importance of the difference between two packaging sizes, I can't translate them into my target language, where I'm also placing this question. Hopefully some help can arrive before my deadline expires.

Thank you for any help and have a nice day.
Peter Simon
Netherlands
Local time: 17:04
Origin of term: countline sold by count/number/unit v tablet sold by weight
Explanation:
The market definition of a chocolate countline is a product that is sold by count rather than weight (like moulded bars), — a chocolate product that is bought "for me now."
https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=qCZOAAAAYAAJ&dq="countli...

In the 1980s Cadbury (the predecessor of Cadbury Trebor Bassett) developed a new production process which could extrude chocolate into different shapes and textures without the use of moulds which was used to manufacture a new impulse ‘countline’ snack product. Countline is the name given to chocolate bars originally sold by number in units rather than by weight. In 2006 the overall countline market was worth around £850m (Cadbury promotional literature, 2006). The new product brief was to develop a product that would ‘build on Cadbury’s Dairy Milk heritage in a pure chocolate countline format, exploring all possible textures, configurations and resultant “eats”’ (Cadbury, 1991).
https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=lqN-AgAAQBAJ&pg=PT396&lp...

• Countlines: chocolate-covered bars designed to be eaten as a snack and on the go. This includes bitesize countlines sold in multipacks. This category has an extremely wide range of brands, with many available in different sizes or multipacks to address each of the areas of consumer needs, from hunger satisfaction to indulgence. Manufacturers are constantly developing new varieties. This market segment is dominated by “Kit Kat” and “Mars” bars. Products marketed as biscuits or cookies are not included in this category;
• Tablets: solid chocolate bars, blocks or tablets shaped by pouring melted chocolate into moulds, with or without added ingredients;
http://s3.amazonaws.com/zanran_storage/www.icco.org/ContentP...

26.2 Confectionery types
26.2.1 Moulded chocolate tablets and bars
26.2.2 Chocolate countlines
The “countline” is the core of the large-scale chocolate business in many countries. It is typically an enrobed irregular shaped product in contrast to the uniform shape of a tablet. Flow wrap packaging formats dominate the countline market.
https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=o1A_DgAAQBAJ&pg=PT980&lp...

The three basic categories are:
(i) Chocolate bars (which may or may not be filled). The typical product is a standard bar of say, Cadbury's or Hershey's.
(ii) Countlines (so called because they are normally sold in single units, that is, by "count" as are chocolate bars, but involve a mixture of chocolate with other ingredients). The quintessential countline is the Mars bar, but the category covers a broad range of items including light products such as chocolate-covered wafers of the Kit-Kat type.
(iii) Assortments
https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=HfxcCO5msgwC&pg=PA267&dq...

Selected response from:

Alison MacG
United Kingdom
Local time: 16:04
Grading comment
Thank you and all for your help! I do miss a clear reaction to the definitions I quoted in the debate section though, which is somewhat contradictory to this.
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



SUMMARY OF ALL EXPLANATIONS PROVIDED
3 +5Origin of term: countline sold by count/number/unit v tablet sold by weight
Alison MacG
1 -1Quality vs Quantity
Christine007


Discussion entries: 15





  

Answers


4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +5
Origin of term: countline sold by count/number/unit v tablet sold by weight


Explanation:
The market definition of a chocolate countline is a product that is sold by count rather than weight (like moulded bars), — a chocolate product that is bought "for me now."
https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=qCZOAAAAYAAJ&dq="countli...

In the 1980s Cadbury (the predecessor of Cadbury Trebor Bassett) developed a new production process which could extrude chocolate into different shapes and textures without the use of moulds which was used to manufacture a new impulse ‘countline’ snack product. Countline is the name given to chocolate bars originally sold by number in units rather than by weight. In 2006 the overall countline market was worth around £850m (Cadbury promotional literature, 2006). The new product brief was to develop a product that would ‘build on Cadbury’s Dairy Milk heritage in a pure chocolate countline format, exploring all possible textures, configurations and resultant “eats”’ (Cadbury, 1991).
https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=lqN-AgAAQBAJ&pg=PT396&lp...

• Countlines: chocolate-covered bars designed to be eaten as a snack and on the go. This includes bitesize countlines sold in multipacks. This category has an extremely wide range of brands, with many available in different sizes or multipacks to address each of the areas of consumer needs, from hunger satisfaction to indulgence. Manufacturers are constantly developing new varieties. This market segment is dominated by “Kit Kat” and “Mars” bars. Products marketed as biscuits or cookies are not included in this category;
• Tablets: solid chocolate bars, blocks or tablets shaped by pouring melted chocolate into moulds, with or without added ingredients;
http://s3.amazonaws.com/zanran_storage/www.icco.org/ContentP...

26.2 Confectionery types
26.2.1 Moulded chocolate tablets and bars
26.2.2 Chocolate countlines
The “countline” is the core of the large-scale chocolate business in many countries. It is typically an enrobed irregular shaped product in contrast to the uniform shape of a tablet. Flow wrap packaging formats dominate the countline market.
https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=o1A_DgAAQBAJ&pg=PT980&lp...

The three basic categories are:
(i) Chocolate bars (which may or may not be filled). The typical product is a standard bar of say, Cadbury's or Hershey's.
(ii) Countlines (so called because they are normally sold in single units, that is, by "count" as are chocolate bars, but involve a mixture of chocolate with other ingredients). The quintessential countline is the Mars bar, but the category covers a broad range of items including light products such as chocolate-covered wafers of the Kit-Kat type.
(iii) Assortments
https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=HfxcCO5msgwC&pg=PA267&dq...



Alison MacG
United Kingdom
Local time: 16:04
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 3
Grading comment
Thank you and all for your help! I do miss a clear reaction to the definitions I quoted in the debate section though, which is somewhat contradictory to this.
Notes to answerer
Asker: This is very interesting, thank you.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Christine007: Thanks Alison for helping!
14 mins

agree  Morad Seif
57 mins

agree  Yvonne Gallagher: 100%
1 hr

agree  Ashutosh Mitra
12 hrs

agree  acetran
22 hrs
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5 peer agreement (net): -1
Quality vs Quantity


Explanation:
Quality "healthy" sweets than quantity.

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Note added at 11 hrs (2017-10-13 21:14:56 GMT)
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https://books.google.ro/books?id=GCWsAgAAQBAJ&pg=PA106&lpg=P...

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Note added at 11 hrs (2017-10-13 21:15:30 GMT)
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https://books.google.ro/books?id=GCWsAgAAQBAJ&pg=PA106&lpg=P...

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Note added at 11 hrs (2017-10-13 21:17:59 GMT)
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Apologies for such a big link..

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Note added at 18 hrs (2017-10-14 04:27:40 GMT)
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For Gallagy: She share the link in a few parts. Important thing is that our collegue Peter resolve the problem.

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Note added at 18 hrs (2017-10-14 04:32:25 GMT)
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Google it: Consumer Behavior Analysis: (A) Rational Approach to Consumer Choice
editat de Donald A. Hantula,Victoria K. Wells
Very important to know exactly what are you search for to find an answer..

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Note added at 18 hrs (2017-10-14 04:55:40 GMT)
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If not, Google search for key words: countline and table chocolate


    Reference: http://https://books.google.ro/books?id=HfxcCO5msgwC&pg=PA26...
Christine007
Romania
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thank you, Christine, but your source is unavailable and your solution contradicts all other available solutions and meanings, provide here too, sorry.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Yvonne Gallagher: not at all//sorry but it's nothing to do with quantity vs quality or "healthy" sweets. And your link doesn't work whereas Alison gives several relevent ones to prove her point.
1 hr
  -> The link I posted is already taken by Alison my dear.. Anyway, good luck!
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